22 Works

Data from: Pollution-tolerant invertebrates enhance greenhouse gas flux in urban wetlands

Andrew S. Mehring, Perran L.M. Cook, Victor Evrard, Stanley B. Grant, Lisa A. Levin & Perran L. M. Cook
One of the goals of urban ecology is to link community structure to ecosystem function in urban habitats. Pollution-tolerant wetland invertebrates have been shown to enhance greenhouse gas (GHG) flux in controlled laboratory experiments, suggesting that they may influence urban wetland roles as sources or sinks of GHG. However, it is unclear if their effects can be detected in highly variable conditions in a field setting. Here we use an extensive dataset on carbon dioxide...

Data from: Monarch butterfly population decline in North America: identifying the threatening processes

Wayne E. Thogmartin, Ruscena Wiederholt, Karen Oberhauser, Ryan G. Drum, Jay E. Diffendorfer, Sonia Altizer, Orley R. Taylor, John Pleasants, Darius Semmens, Brice Semmens, Richard Erickson, Kaitlin Libby & Laura Lopez-Hoffman
The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) population in North America has sharply declined over the last two decades. Despite rising concern over the monarch butterfly's status, no comprehensive study of the factors driving this decline has been conducted. Using partial least-squares regressions and time-series analysis, we investigated climatic and habitat-related factors influencing monarch population size from 1993 to 2014. Potential threats included climatic factors, habitat loss (milkweed and overwinter forest), disease and agricultural insecticide use (neonicotinoids)....

Data from: Crossing the line: tunas actively exploit submesoscale fronts to enhance foraging success

Stephanie Snyder, Peter J. S. Franks, Lynne D. Talley, Yi Xu & Suzanne Kohin
Fronts – i.e., the boundaries between water masses – are ubiquitous in the world oceans and have been shown to significantly influence pelagic ecosystems with enhanced local productivity and increased abundances of forage fish and top predators. Here we use data from archival tags to document how four juvenile albacore tunas foraged at and exploited a thermal front. Of the 3,098 observed trips, the albacore mainly swam across the front between the warm side above...

Data from: The role of feeding morphology and competition in governing the diet breadth of sympatric stomatopod crustaceans

Maya S. DeVries
Competition for food drives divergence and specialization in feeding morphology. Stomatopod crustaceans have two kinds of highly specialized feeding appendages: either elongate spear-like appendages (spearers) used to ambush soft-bodied evasive prey or hammer-like appendages (smashers) that produce extremely high forces used both to break hard-shelled prey and to capture evasive prey. To evaluate associations between appendage type and feeding ecology, the diet of two small smasher and spearer species (size range: 21–27 mm) that co-occur...

Data from: Evolution of organismal stoichiometry in a long-term experiment with Escherichia coli

Caroline B. Turner, Brian D. Wade, Justin R. Meyer, Brooke A. Sommerfeld & Richard E. Lenski
Organismal stoichiometry refers to the relative proportion of chemical elements in the biomass of organisms, and it can have important effects on ecological interactions from population to ecosystem scales. Although stoichiometry has been studied extensively from an ecological perspective, much less is known about the rates and directions of evolutionary changes in elemental composition. We measured carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus content of 12 Escherichia coli populations that evolved under controlled carbon-limited, serial-transfer conditions for 50...

Data from: Gradual loading ameliorates maladaptation in computational simulations of vein graft growth and remodelling

Abhay Bangalore Ramachandra, Jay D. Humphrey & Alison L. Marsden
Vein graft failure is a prevalent problem in vascular surgeries, including bypass grafting and arteriovenous fistula procedures in which veins are subjected to severe changes in pressure and flow. Animal and clinical studies provide significant insight, but understanding the complex underlying coupled mechanisms can be advanced using computational models. Towards this end, we propose a new model of venous growth and remodelling (G&R) based on a constrained mixture theory. First, we identify constitutive relations and...

Data from: Limited trophic partitioning among sympatric delphinids off a tropical oceanic atoll

Hillary Young, Katherine Nigro, Douglas J. McCauley, Lisa T. Ballance, Erin M. Oleson & Simone Baumann-Pickering
Understanding trophic relationships among marine predators in remote environments is challenging, but it is critical to understand community structure and dynamics. In this study, we used stable isotope analysis of skin biopsies to compare the isotopic, and thus, trophic niches of three sympatric delphinids in the waters surrounding Palmyra Atoll, in the Central Tropical Pacific: the melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), Gray’s spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris longirostris), and the common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). δ15N values...

Data from: Evaluating the impact of domestication and captivity on the horse gut microbiome

Jessica L. Metcalf, Se Jin Song, James T. Morton, Sophie Weiss, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Frédéric Joly, Claudia Feh, Pierre Taberlet, Eric Coissac, Amnon Amir, Eske Willerslev, Rob Knight, Valerie McKenzie & Ludovic Orlando
The mammal gut microbiome, which includes host microbes and their respective genes, is now recognized as an essential second genome that provides critical functions to the host. In humans, studies have revealed that lifestyle strongly influences the composition and diversity of the gastrointestinal microbiome. We hypothesized that these trends in humans may be paralleled in mammals subjected to anthropogenic forces such as domestication and captivity, in which diets and natural life histories are often greatly...

Data from: Age, gender, neck circumference, and Epworth sleepiness scale do not predict obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): the challenge to predict OSA in advanced COPD

Xavier Soler, S.Y. Liao, J.M. Marin, G. Lorenzi-Filho, R. Jen, P. DeYoung, R.L. Owens, A.L. Ries & A. Malhotra
The combination of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that predictors of OSA among patients with COPD may be distinct from OSA in the general population. Therefore, we investigated associations between traditional OSA risk factors (e.g. age), and sleep questionnaires [e.g. Epworth Sleepiness Scale] in 44 patients with advanced COPD. As a second aim we proposed a pilot, simplified screening test for...

Data from: Probiotic treatment restores protection against lethal fungal infection lost during amphibian captivity

Jordan G. Kueneman, Douglas C. Woodhams, Reid Harris, Holly M. Archer, Rob Knight & Valerie J. McKenzie
Host-associated microbiomes perform many beneficial functions including resisting pathogens and training the immune system. Here, we show that amphibians developing in captivity lose substantial skin bacterial diversity, primarily due to reduced ongoing input from environmental sources. We combined studies of wild and captive amphibians with a database of over 1 000 strains that allows us to examine antifungal function of the skin microbiome. We tracked skin bacterial communities of 62 endangered boreal toads, Anaxyrus boreas,...

Data from: A 3,000 year record of Caribbean reef urchin communities reveals causes and consequences of long-term decline in Diadema antillarum

Katie L. Cramer, Aaron O'Dea, Carolina Carpenter & Richard D. Norris
Urchins are the last abundant grazers of macroalgae on most Caribbean reefs following the historical overexploitation of herbivorous fishes. The long-spined urchin Diadema antillarum was particularly effective at controlling macroalgae and facilitating coral dominance on Caribbean reefs until its ecological extinction from a catastrophic disease epidemic in the early 1980s. Despite their important role in the structure and functioning of Caribbean reef ecosystems, the natural dynamics of Caribbean reef urchin communities are poorly known due...

Data from: Geographic signatures in species turnover: decoupling colonization and extinction across a latitudinal gradient

Natalie T. Jones & Benjamin Gilbert
High latitude communities have low species richness and are rapidly warming with climate change. Thus, temporal changes in community composition are expected to be greatest at high latitudes. However, at the same time traits such as body size can also change with latitude, potentially offsetting or increasing changes to community composition over time. We tested how zooplankton communities (copepods and cladocerans) have changed over a 25-75 year time span by assessing colonization and extinction rates...

Data from: Neonicotinoid pesticides and nutritional stress synergistically reduce survival in honey bees

Simone Tosi, James C. Nieh, Fabio Sgolastra, Riccardo Cabbri & Piotr Medrzycki
The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is a major pollinator whose health is of global concern. Declines in honey bee health are related to multiple factors, including resource quality and pesticide contamination. Intensive agricultural areas with crop monocultures potentially reduce the quality and quantity of available nutrients and expose bee foragers to pesticides. However, there is, to date, no evidence for synergistic effects between pesticides and nutritional stress in animals. The neonicotinoids clothianidin (CLO) and...

Data from: Fragility of foot process morphology in kidney podocytes arises from chaotic spatial propagation of cytoskeletal instability

Cibele V. Falkenberg, Evren U. Azeloglu, Mark Stothers, Thomas J. Deerinck, Yibang Chen, John C. He, Mark H. Ellisman, James C. Hone, Ravi Iyenger & Leslie M. Loew
The kidney podocyte's function depends on finger-like projections (foot processes) that interdigitate with those from neighboring cells to form the glomerular filtration barrier. The integrity of the barrier depends on spatial control of dynamics of actin cytoskeleton in the foot processes. We determined how imbalances in regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics can result in pathological morphology. We obtained 3-D electron microscopy images of podocytes and used quantitative features to build dynamical models to investigate how...

Data from: Top predators determine how biodiversity is partitioned across time and space

Benjamin G. Van Allen, Nick L. Rasmussen, Christopher J. Dibble, Patrick A. Clay, Volker H.W. Rudolf & Volker H. W. Rudolf
Natural ecosystems are shaped along two fundamental axes, space and time, but how biodiversity is partitioned along both axes is not well understood. Here, we show that the relationship between temporal and spatial biodiversity patterns can vary predictably according to habitat characteristics. By quantifying seasonal and annual changes in larval dragonfly communities across a natural predation gradient we demonstrate that variation in the identity of top predator species is associated with systematic differences in spatio-temporal...

Data from: Early stages of sea-level rise lead to decreased salt marsh plant diversity through stronger competition in Mediterranean-climate marshes

Akana E. Noto & Jonathan B. Shurin
Climate change shuffles species ranges and creates novel interactions that may either buffer communities against climate change or exacerbate its effect. For instance, facilitation can become more prevalent in salt marshes under stressful conditions while competition is stronger in benign environments. Sea-level rise (SLR) is a consequence of climate change that affects the distribution of stress from inundation and salinity. To determine how interactions early in SLR are affected by changes in these two stressors...

Data from: Low-dose proton radiation effects in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease - implications for space travel

Emil Rudobeck, John A. Bellone, Attila Szücs, Kristine Bonnick, Shalini Mehrotra-Carter, Jerome Badaut, Gregory A. Nelson, Richard E. Hartman & Roman Vlkolinsky
Space radiation represents a significant health risk for astronauts. Ground-based animal studies indicate that space radiation affects neuronal functions such as excitability, synaptic transmission, and plasticity, and it may accelerate the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although protons represent the main constituent in the space radiation spectrum, their effects on AD-related pathology have not been tested. We irradiated 3 month-old APP/PSEN1 transgenic (TG) and wild type (WT) mice with protons (150 MeV; 0.1-1.0 Gy; whole...

Data from: A two-state model of tree evolution and its applications to alu retrotransposition

Niema Moshiri & Siavash Mirarab
Models of tree evolution have mostly focused on capturing the cladogenesis processes behind speciation. Processes that derive the evolution of genomic elements, such as repeats, are not necessarily captured by these existing models. In this paper, we design a model of tree evolution that we call the dual-birth model, and we show how it can be useful in studying the evolution of short Alu repeats found in the human genome in abundance. The dual-birth model...

Data from: DNA sequencing of fish eggs and larvae reveals high species diversity and seasonal changes in spawning activity in the southeastern Gulf of California

Ana L.M. Ahern, Jaime Gómez-Gutiérrez, Octavio J. Aburto-Oropeza, Ricardo J. Saldierna-Martínez, Andrew F. Johnson, Alice E. Harada, Arturo R. Sánchez-Uvera, Brad Erisman, David I. Castro Arvizú & Ronald S. Burton
Ichthyoplankton studies can provide valuable information on the species richness and spawning activity of fishes, complementing estimations done using trawls and diver surveys. Zooplankton samples were collected weekly between January and December 2014 in Cabo Pulmo National Park, Gulf of California, Mexico (n=48). Fish larvae and particularly eggs are difficult to identify morphologically, therefore the DNA barcoding method was employed to identify 4,388 specimens, resulting in 158 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) corresponding to species. Scarus...

Data from: Advancing Precambrian palaeomagnetism with the PALEOMAGIA and PINT(QPI) databases

Toni H. Veikkolainen, Andrew J. Biggin, Lauri J. Pesonen, David A. Evans & Nicholas A. Jarboe
State-of-the-art measurements of the direction and intensity of Earth’s ancient magnetic field have made important contributions to our understanding of the geology and palaeogeography of Precambrian Earth. The PALEOMAGIA and PINT(QPI) databases provide thorough public collections of important palaeomagnetic data of this kind. They comprise more than 4,100 observations in total and have been essential in supporting our international collaborative efforts to understand Earth's magnetic history on a timescale far longer than that of the...

Data from: CO2-induced ocean acidification does not affect individual or group behaviour in a temperate damselfish

Garfield Tsz Kwan, Trevor James Hamilton & Martin Tresguerres
Open ocean surface CO2 levels are projected to reach approximately 800 µatm, and ocean pH to decrease by approximately 0.3 units by the year 2100 due to anthropogenic CO2 emissions and the subsequent process of ocean acidification (OA). When exposed to these CO2/pH values, several fish species display abnormal behaviour in laboratory tests, an effect proposed to be linked to altered neuronal GABAA­ receptor function. Juvenile blacksmith (Chromis punctipinnis) are social fish that regularly experience...

Data from: Physiological, morphological, and ecological tradeoffs influence vertical habitat use of deep-diving toothed-whales in the Bahamas

Trevor W. Joyce, John W. Durban, Diane E. Claridge, Charlotte A. Dunn, Holly Fearnbach, Kim M. Parsons, Russel D. Andrews & Lisa T. Ballance
Dive capacity among toothed whales (suborder: Odontoceti) has been shown to generally increase with body mass in a relationship closely linked to the allometric scaling of metabolic rates. However, two odontocete species tagged in this study, the Blainville’s beaked whale Mesoplodon densirostris and the Cuvier’s beaked whale Ziphius cavirostris, confounded expectations of a simple allometric relationship, with exceptionally long (mean: 46.1 min & 65.4 min) and deep dives (mean: 1129 m & 1179 m), and...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    22

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    22

Affiliations

  • University of California, San Diego
    22
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    3
  • University of Colorado Boulder
    2
  • Yale University
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • MacEwan University
    1
  • Rice University
    1
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1
  • Columbia University
    1
  • University of California System
    1