6 Works

Data from: Mesoscale activity facilitates energy gain in a top predator

Briana Abrahms, Kylie L. Scales, Elliott L. Hazen, Steven J. Bograd, Robert S. Schick, Patrick W. Robinson & Daniel P. Costa
How animal movement decisions interact with the distribution of resources to shape individual performance is a key question in ecology. However, links between spatial and behavioural ecology and fitness consequences are poorly understood because the outcomes of individual resource selection decisions, such as energy intake, are rarely measured. In the open ocean, mesoscale features (~10-100 km) such as fronts and eddies can aggregate prey and thereby drive the distribution of foraging vertebrates through bottom-up biophysical...

Data from: Mitochondrial genome fragmentation unites the parasitic lice of eutherian mammals

Fan Song, Hu Li, Guo-Hua Liu, Wei Wang, Peter James, Douglas D. Colwell, Anette Tran, Siyu Gong, Wanzhi Cai & Renfu Shao
Organelle genome fragmentation has been found in a wide range of eukaryotic lineages; however, its use in phylogenetic reconstruction has not been demonstrated. We explored the use of mitochondrial (mt) genome fragmentation in resolving the controversial suborder-level phylogeny of parasitic lice (order Phthiraptera). There are ~5,000 species of parasitic lice in four suborders (Amblycera, Ischnocera, Rhyncophthirina and Anoplura), which infest mammals and birds. The phylogenetic relationships among these suborders are unresolved despite decades of studies....

Data from: Biochemical evolution in response to intensive harvesting in algae: evolution of quality and quantity

Dustin J. Marshall, Rebecca J. Lawton, Keyne Monro & Nicholas A. Paul
Evolutionary responses to indirect selection pressures imposed by intensive harvesting are increasingly common. While artificial selection has shown that biochemical components can show rapid and dramatic evolution, it remains unclear as to whether intensive harvesting can inadvertently induce changes in the biochemistry of harvested populations. For applications such as algal culture, many of the desirable bioproducts could evolve in response to harvesting, reducing cost-effectiveness, but experimental tests are lacking. We used an experimental evolution approach...

Data from: Multidimensional analyses of physical performance reveal a size dependent trade-off between suites of traits

Jordan E. Charters, Jaime Heiniger, Christofer J. Clemente, Skye F. Cameron, Ami F. Amir Abdul Nasir, Amanda C. Niehaus & Robbie S. Wilson
1. Animal movement is multidimensional and complex, and to understand the motor system of wild animals in the context of their natural ecology, we must analyze how suites of performance traits both mutualistically and antagonistically affect function —a necessity highlighted by previous work on performance trade-offs. 2. Evidence from some studies of human athletes using multidimensional analyses of performance suggests that overall quality among individuals can mask functional trade-offs within them, yet no studies have...

Data from: The cascading pathogenic consequences of Sarcoptes scabiei infection that manifest in host disease

Alynn M. Martin, Tamieka A. Fraser, John A. Lesku, Kellie Simpson, Georgia L. Roberts, Jillian Garvey, Adam Polkinghorne, Christopher P. Burridge & Scott Carver
Sarcoptic mange, caused by the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei, causes a substantive burden of disease to humans, domestic animals, and wildlife, globally. There are many effects of S. scabiei infection, culminating in the disease which hosts suffer. However, major knowledge gaps remain on the pathogenic impacts of this infection. Here, we focus on the bare-nosed wombat host (Vombatus ursinus) to investigate the effects of mange on: (i) host heat loss and thermoregulation, (ii) field metabolic...

Data from: Without management interventions, endemic wet-sclerophyll forest is transitioning to rainforest in World Heritage listed K’gari (Fraser Island), Australia

Vithya Krishnan, Nicole Robinson, Jennifer Firn, Grahame Applegate, John Herbohn & Susanne Schmidt
Wet-sclerophyll forests are unique ecosystems that can transition to dry-sclerophyll forests or to rainforests. Understanding of the dynamics of these forests for conservation is limited. We evaluated the long-term succession of wet-sclerophyll forest on World Heritage listed K’gari (Fraser Island)the world’s largest sand island. We recorded the presence and growth of tree species in three 0.4 hectare plots that had been subjected to selective logging, fire, and cyclone disturbance over 65 years, from 1952 to...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • University of the Sunshine Coast
    6
  • University of Queensland
    3
  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • Hunan Agricultural University
    1
  • University of Tasmania
    1
  • La Trobe University
    1
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    1
  • Monash University
    1
  • Queensland University of Technology
    1