68 Works

Data from: The demographic history of populations experiencing asymmetric gene flow: combining simulated and empirical data.

Ivan Paz Viñas, Erwan Quéméré, Lounès Chikhi, Géraldine Loot & Simon Blanchet
Population structure can significantly affect genetic-based demographic inferences, generating spurious bottleneck-like signals. Previous studies have typically assumed island or stepping-stone models, which are characterized by symmetric gene flow. However, many organisms are characterized by asymmetric gene flow. Here, we combined simulated and empirical data to test whether asymmetric gene flow affects the inference of past demographic changes. Through the analysis of simulated genetic data with three methods (i.e. bottleneck, M-ratio and msvar), we demonstrated that...

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Migration and dispersal may drive to high genetic variation and significant genetic mixing: the case of two agriculturally important, continental hoverflies (Episyrphus balteatus and Sphaerophoria scripta)

Lucie Raymond, Manuel Plantegenest & Aude Vialatte
Population structure of pests and beneficial species is an important issue when designing management strategies to optimize ecosystem services. In this study, we investigated for the first time the population structure at a continental scale of two migratory species of hoverflies providing both pest regulation and pollination services [Episyrphus balteatus and Sphaerophoria scripta (Diptera: Syrphidae)]. To achieve this objective, we used two sets of 12 species-specific microsatellite markers on a large-scale sampling from all over...

Data from: Nutrition in extreme food specialists: an illustration using termites

Laure-Anne Poissonnier, Sara Arganda, Stephen J. Simpson, Audrey Dussutour & Jerome Buhl
1. Recent nutritional ecology theories predict that an organism feeding on a single, highly predictable food should lack the typical active regulation of nutrient balance observed in all other organisms studied so far. It could instead limit itself to controlling the amount of food eaten alone. Such an animal would however be strongly affected by nutrient imbalances. 2. Termites are an ideal model animal to test those predictions. 3. We investigated how the nutritional content...

Data from: Unlocking biodiversity and conservation studies in high‐diversity environments using environmental DNA (eDNA): a test with Guianese freshwater fishes

Kévin Cilleros, Alice Valentini, Luc Allard, Tony Dejean, Roselyne Etienne, Gaël Grenouillet, Amaia Iribar, Pierre Taberlet, Régis Vigouroux & Sébastien Brosse
Determining the species compositions of local assemblages is a prerequisite to understanding how anthropogenic disturbances affect biodiversity. However, biodiversity measurements often remain incomplete due to the limited efficiency of sampling methods. This is particularly true in freshwater tropical environments that host rich fish assemblages, for which assessments are uncertain and often rely on destructive methods. Developing an efficient and non-destructive method to assess biodiversity in tropical freshwaters is highly important. In this study, we tested...

Data from: Climate change and human colonization triggered habitat loss and fragmentation in Madagascar.

Jordi Salmona, Rasmus Heller, Erwan Quéméré & Lounès Chikhi
The relative effect of past climate fluctuations and anthropogenic activities on current biome distribution is subject to increasing attention, notably in biodiversity hot spots. In Madagascar, where humans arrived in the last ~4 to 5,000 years, the exact causes of the demise of large vertebrates that cohabited with humans are yet unclear. The prevailing narrative holds that Madagascar was covered with forest before human arrival and that the expansion of grasslands was the result of...

Data from: Ecological mechanisms and phylogeny shape invertebrate stoichiometry: a test using detritus-based communities across Central and South America

Angélica L. González, Régis Céréghino, Olivier Dézerald, Vinicius F. Farjalla, Céline Leroy, Barbara A. Richardson, Michael J. Richardson, Gustavo Q. Romero & Diane S. Srivastava
1. Stoichiometric differences among organisms can affect trophic interactions and rates of nutrient cycling within ecosystems. However, we still know little about either the underlying causes of these stoichiometric differences, or the consistency of these differences across large geographic extents. 2. Here we analyze elemental (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus) composition of 872 aquatic macroinvertebrates (71 species) inhabiting tank bromeliads (n = 140) from five distantly located sites across Central and South America to (1) test phylogenetic,...

Data from: Vegetation response to control of invasive Tamarix in southwestern US rivers: a collaborative study including 416 sites

Eduardo González, Anna A. Sher, Robert M. Anderson, Robin F. Bay, Daniel W. Bean, Gabriel J. Bissonnete, Bérenger Bourgeois, David J. Cooper, Kara Dohrenwend, Kim D. Eichhorst, Hisham El Waer, Deborah K. Kennard, Rebecca Harms-Weissinger, Annie L. Henry, Lori J. Makarick, Steven M. Ostoja, Lindsay V. Reynolds, W. Wright Robinson & Patrick B. Shafroth
Most studies assessing vegetation response following control of invasive Tamarix trees along southwestern U.S. rivers have been small in scale (e.g., river reach), or at a regional scale but with poor spatial-temporal replication, and most have not included testing the effects of a now widely-used biological control. We monitored plant composition following Tamarix control along hydrologic, soil and climatic gradients in 244 treated and 172 reference sites across six U.S. States. This represents the largest...

Data from: Arthropod diversity in a tropical forest

Yves Basset, Lukas Cizek, Philippe Cuénoud, Raphael K. Didham, François Guilhaumon, Olivier Missa, Vojtech Novotny, Frode Ødegaard, Tomas Roslin, Jürgen Schmidl, Alexey K. Tishechkin, Neville N. Winchester, David W. Roubik, Henri-Pierre Aberlenc, Johannes Bail, Héctor Barrios, Jon R. Bridle, Gabriela Castaño-Meneses, Bruno Corbara, Gianfranco Curletti, Wesley Duarte Da Rocha, Domir De Bakker, Jacques H. C. Delabie, Alain Dejean, Laura L. Fagan … & Maurice Leponce
Most eukaryotic organisms are arthropods. Yet, their diversity in rich terrestrial ecosystems is still unknown. Here we produce tangible estimates of the total species richness of arthropods in a tropical rainforest. Using a comprehensive range of structured protocols, we sampled the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa from the soil to the forest canopy in the San Lorenzo forest, Panama. We collected 6,144 arthropod species from 0.48 ha and extrapolated total species richness to larger areas...

Data from: Differential chromosome conformations as hallmarks of cellular identity revealed by mathematical polymer modeling

Imene Lassadi, Alain Kamgoué, Isabelle Goiffon, Nicolas Tanguy-Le-Gac, Kerstin Bystricky & Imen Lassadi
Inherently dynamic, chromosomes adopt many different conformations in response to DNA metabolism. Models of chromosome organization in the yeast nucleus obtained from genome-wide chromosome conformation data or biophysical simulations provide important insights into the average behavior but fail to reveal features from dynamic or transient events that are only visible in a fraction of cells at any given moment. We developed a method to determine chromosome conformation from relative positions of three fluorescently tagged DNA...

Data from: Division of labor as a bipartite network

Cristian Pasquaretta & Raphael Jeanson
Bipartite ecological networks are increasingly used to described and model relationships between interacting species (e.g. plant-pollinator or host parasite). Here, we apply network methods developed in community ecology to quantify division of labor in insect societies. We consider two quantitative indices (H2' and d') derived from information theory that inform on how much the actual patterns of task performance deviates from the null expectation that workers perform tasks randomly. In addition, we computed network modularity...

Data from: Initiation of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection in the absence of physical contact with infected hosts – a field study in a high altitude lake

Elodie A. Courtois, Adeline Loyau, Mégane Bourgoin & Dirk S. Schmeller
Understanding transmission is a critical prerequisite for predicting disease dynamics and impacts on host populations. It is well established that Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the amphibian fungal pathogen responsible for chytridiomycosis, can be transmitted directly, through physical contact with an infected host. However, indirect pathways of transmission remain poorly investigated. We conducted a five-week long field infection experiment at a high altitude mountain lake in the French Pyrenees to investigate Bd transmission pathways in larval midwife...

Data from: Stable epigenetic effects impact adaptation in allopolyploid orchids (Dactylorhiza: Orchidaceae)

Ovidiu Paun, Richard M. Bateman, Michael F. Fay, Mikael Hedrén, Laure Civeyrel & Mark W. Chase
Epigenetic information includes heritable signals that modulate gene expression but are not encoded in the primary nucleotide sequence. We have studied natural epigenetic variation in three allotetraploid sibling orchid species that differ radically in geography/ecology. The epigenetic variation released by genome doubling has been restructured in species-specific patterns that reflect their recent evolutionary history, and have an impact on their ecology and evolution, hundreds of generations after their formation. Epigenome scans pinpointed epiloci under divergent...

Data from: Cross-cultural variation in men’s preference for sexual dimorphism in women’s faces

Mikhail V. Kozlov, Huajian Cai, Jorge Contreras-Garduño, Barnaby J. Dixson, Gavita A. Oana, Gwenaël Kaminski, Norman P. Li, Minna T. Lyons, Ike E. Onyishi, Keshav Prasai, Farid Pazhoohi, Pavol Prokop, Sandra L. Rosales Cardozo, Nicolle Sydney, Jose C. Yong, Markus J. Rantala, U. M. Marcinkowska & J. Contreras-Garduno
Both attractiveness judgements and mate preferences vary considerably cross-culturally. We investigated whether men's preference for femininity in women's faces varies between 28 countries with diverse health conditions by analysing responses of 1972 heterosexual participants. Although men in all countries preferred feminized over masculinized female faces, we found substantial differences between countries in the magnitude of men's preferences. Using an average femininity preference for each country, we found men's facial femininity preferences correlated positively with the...

Data from: Symmetry breaking and inter-clonal behavioural variability in slime molds

David Vogel, Audrey Dussutour & Jean-Louis Deneubourg
Cells are dynamic systems capable of switching from an isotropic growth to a polarized growth even in the absence of any pre-existing external asymmetry. Here, we study this process of symmetry breaking in the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum. In the experiments slime molds could grow on two identical opposed sources of calcium. We highlighted a positive correlation between growth dynamic, level of symmetry breaking and calcium concentration. We identified three populations of slime molds...

Data from: A new genus of horse from Pleistocene North America

Peter D. Heintzman, Grant D. Zazula, Ross D.E. MacPhee, Eric Scott, James A. Cahill, Brianna K. McHorse, Joshua D. Kapp, Mathias Stiller, Matthew J. Wooller, Ludovic Orlando, John R. Southon, Duane G. Froese, Beth Shapiro & John Southon
The extinct “New World stilt-legged”, or NWSL, equids constitute a perplexing group of Pleistocene horses endemic to North America. Their slender distal limb bones resemble those of Asiatic asses, such as the Persian onager. Previous palaeogenetic studies, however, have suggested a closer relationship to caballine horses than to Asiatic asses. Here, we report complete mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomes from NWSL equids from across their geographic range. Although multiple NWSL equid species have been named,...

Data from: Symbolic representation of numerosity by honeybees (Apis mellifera): matching characters to small quantities

Scarlett Howard, Aurore Avarguès-Weber, Jair Garcia, Andrew Greentree & Adrian Dyer
The assignment of a symbolic representation to a specific numerosity is a fundamental requirement for humans solving complex mathematical calculations used in diverse applications such as algebra, accounting, physics, and everyday commerce. Here we show that honeybees are able to learn to match a sign to a numerosity, or a numerosity to a sign and subsequently transfer this knowledge to novel numerosity stimuli changed in colour properties, shape, and configuration. While honeybees learnt the associations...

Data from: Differential divergence in autosomes and sex chromosomes is associated with intra-island diversification at a very small spatial scale in a songbird lineage

Yann Bourgeois, Joris Bertrand, Boris Delahaie, Helene Holota, Christophe Thebaud & Borja Mila
Recently diverged taxa showing marked phenotypic and ecological diversity are optimal systems to understand the genetic processes underlying speciation. We used genome-wide markers to investigate the diversification of the Reunion grey white eye (Zosterops borbonicus) on the small volcanic island of Reunion (Mascarene archipelago), where this species complex exhibits four geographic forms that are parapatrically distributed across the island and differ strikingly in plumage colour. One form restricted to the highlands is separated by a...

Multiscale drivers of carabid beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in small European woodlands

Ronan Marrec, Vincent Le Roux, Ludmilla Martin, Jonathan Lenoir, Jörg Brunet, Sara Cousins, Pallieter De Smedt, Marc Deconchat, Martin Diekmann, Steffen Ehrmann, Emilie Gallet-Moron, Brice Giffard, Jaan Liira, Jessica Lindgren, Alicia Valdés, Kris Verheyen, Monika Wulf & Guillaume Decocq
Aim The spatiotemporal connectivity of forest patches in lowland agricultural landscapes and their age matter to explain current biodiversity patterns across regional as well as biogeographical extents, to the point that it exceeds the contribution of macroclimate for plant diversity in the understory of temperate forests. Whether this holds true for other taxonomic groups remains largely unknown. Yet, it has important consequences for ecosystem functioning and the delivery of ecosystem services. Focusing on carabid beetle...

Data from: Habitat effects on intra-species variation in functional morphology: evidence from freshwater fish

Fangmin Shuai, Shixiao Yu, Sovan Lek & Xinhui Li
Biotic-environment interactions have long been considered an important factor in functional phenotype differentiation in organisms. The differentiation processes determining functional phenotypes can reveal important mechanisms yielding differences in specific functions of animal traits in the ecosystem. In the present study we examined functional morphological variations in relation to increasing geographic altitude. Six fish species were examined for how environment factors affect intra-specific functional morphology in the subtropical Pearl River in southern China. Functional morphology traits...

Data from: The roots of the drought: hydrology and water uptake strategies mediate forest-wide demographic response to precipitation

Rutuja Chitra-Tarak, Laurent Ruiz, H. S. Dattaraja, M. S. Mohan Kumar, Jean Riotte, H. S. Suresh, Sean M. McMahon & Raman Sukumar
Drought-induced tree mortality is expected to increase globally due to climate change, with profound implications for forest composition, function and global climate feedbacks. How drought is experienced by different species is thought to depend fundamentally on where they access water vertically below ground, but this remains untracked so far due to the difficulty of measuring water availability at depths at which plants access water (few to several tens of meters), the broad temporal scales at...

Data from: Tropical shift in decomposers’ relative contribution to leaf litter breakdown in two Guinean streams

Nathalie Sia Doumbou Tenkiano & Eric Chauvet
The hypothesis that leaf litter breakdown in Guinean streams is governed by microorganisms was confirmed, supporting the reported latitudinal shift in decomposers’ contribution to this process. The large body size of dominant macroinvertebrate decomposers (shrimps) only partially compensated for their very low densities. In contrast with other tropical regions mostly dominated by insect larvae, the functional consequences of global warming on these stream ecosystems may be less severe due to the lower sensitivity of crustaceans...

Data from: On the accuracy of genomic selection

Charles-Elie Rabier, Philippe P. Barre, Torben T. Asp, Gilles G. Charmet & Brigitte B. Mangin
Genomic selection is focused on prediction of breeding values of selection candidates by means of high density of markers. It relies on the assumption that all quantitative trait loci (QTLs) tend to be in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with at least one marker. In this context, we present theoretical results regarding the accuracy of genomic selection, i.e., the correlation between predicted and true breeding values. Typically, for individuals (so-called test individuals), breeding values are predicted...

Data from: Adaptation to climate through flowering phenology: a case study in Medicago truncatula

Concetta Burgarella, Nathalie Chantret, Laurène Gay, Jean-Marie Prosperi, Maxime Bonhomme, Peter Tiffin, Nevin D. Young & Joelle Ronfort
Local climatic conditions likely constitute an important selective pressure on genes underlying important fitness-related traits such as flowering time and in many species flowering phenology and climatic gradients strongly covary. To test whether climate shapes genetic variation on flowering time genes and to identify candidate flowering genes involved in the adaptation to environmental heterogeneity, we used a large M. truncatula core collection to examine the association between nucleotide polymorphisms at 224 candidate genes and both...

Data from: Evolutionary processes driving spatial patterns of intra-specific genetic diversity in river ecosystems

Ivan Paz-Viñas, Géraldine Loot, Virginie M. Stevens, Simon Blanchet & I. Paz-Vinas
Describing, understanding and predicting the spatial distribution of genetic diversity is a central issue in biological sciences. In river landscapes, it is generally predicted that neutral genetic diversity should increase downstream, but there have been few attempts to test and validate this assumption across taxonomic groups. Moreover, it is still unclear what are the evolutionary processes that may generate this apparent spatial pattern of diversity. Here, we quantitatively synthesized published results from diverse taxa living...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    6
  • 2019
    6
  • 2018
    19
  • 2017
    11
  • 2016
    11
  • 2015
    9
  • 2014
    1
  • 2013
    3
  • 2012
    1
  • 2010
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    67
  • Text
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Toulouse
    68
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    19
  • Paul Sabatier University
    4
  • University of British Columbia
    4
  • University of Adelaide
    3
  • Ghent University
    3
  • Research Institute for Nature and Forest
    3
  • University of Toronto
    3
  • University of Padua
    2
  • Centre national de la recherche scientifique
    2