19 Works

Data from: Ecological mechanisms and phylogeny shape invertebrate stoichiometry: a test using detritus-based communities across Central and South America

Angélica L. González, Régis Céréghino, Olivier Dézerald, Vinicius F. Farjalla, Céline Leroy, Barbara A. Richardson, Michael J. Richardson, Gustavo Q. Romero & Diane S. Srivastava
1. Stoichiometric differences among organisms can affect trophic interactions and rates of nutrient cycling within ecosystems. However, we still know little about either the underlying causes of these stoichiometric differences, or the consistency of these differences across large geographic extents. 2. Here we analyze elemental (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus) composition of 872 aquatic macroinvertebrates (71 species) inhabiting tank bromeliads (n = 140) from five distantly located sites across Central and South America to (1) test phylogenetic,...

Data from: Unlocking biodiversity and conservation studies in high‐diversity environments using environmental DNA (eDNA): a test with Guianese freshwater fishes

Kévin Cilleros, Alice Valentini, Luc Allard, Tony Dejean, Roselyne Etienne, Gaël Grenouillet, Amaia Iribar, Pierre Taberlet, Régis Vigouroux & Sébastien Brosse
Determining the species compositions of local assemblages is a prerequisite to understanding how anthropogenic disturbances affect biodiversity. However, biodiversity measurements often remain incomplete due to the limited efficiency of sampling methods. This is particularly true in freshwater tropical environments that host rich fish assemblages, for which assessments are uncertain and often rely on destructive methods. Developing an efficient and non-destructive method to assess biodiversity in tropical freshwaters is highly important. In this study, we tested...

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Nutrition in extreme food specialists: an illustration using termites

Laure-Anne Poissonnier, Sara Arganda, Stephen J. Simpson, Audrey Dussutour & Jerome Buhl
1. Recent nutritional ecology theories predict that an organism feeding on a single, highly predictable food should lack the typical active regulation of nutrient balance observed in all other organisms studied so far. It could instead limit itself to controlling the amount of food eaten alone. Such an animal would however be strongly affected by nutrient imbalances. 2. Termites are an ideal model animal to test those predictions. 3. We investigated how the nutritional content...

Data from: Symmetry breaking and inter-clonal behavioural variability in slime molds

David Vogel, Audrey Dussutour & Jean-Louis Deneubourg
Cells are dynamic systems capable of switching from an isotropic growth to a polarized growth even in the absence of any pre-existing external asymmetry. Here, we study this process of symmetry breaking in the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum. In the experiments slime molds could grow on two identical opposed sources of calcium. We highlighted a positive correlation between growth dynamic, level of symmetry breaking and calcium concentration. We identified three populations of slime molds...

Data from: Shifts in diversification rates and host jump frequencies shaped the diversity of host range among Sclerotiniaceae fungal plant pathogens

Olivier Navaud, Adelin Barbacci, Andrew Taylor, John P. Clarkson & Sylvain Raffaele
The range of hosts that a parasite can infect in nature is a trait determined by its own evolutionary history and that of its potential hosts. However, knowledge on host range diversity and evolution at the family level is often lacking. Here, we investigate host range variation and diversification trends within the Sclerotiniaceae, a family of Ascomycete fungi. Using a phylogenetic framework, we associate diversification rates, the frequency of host jump events, and host range...

Data from: Functional traits and environmental conditions predict community isotopic niches and energy pathways across spatial scales

Olivier Dézerald, Diane S. Srivastava, Régis Céréghino, Jean-François Carrias, Bruno Corbara, Vinicius F. Farjalla, Céline Leroy, Nicholas A. C. Marino, Gustavo C. O. Piccoli, Barbara A. Richardson, Michael J. Richardson, Gustavo Q. Romero & Angélica L. González
1. Despite ongoing research in food web ecology and functional biogeography, the links between food-web structure, functional traits and environmental conditions across spatial scales remain poorly understood. Trophic niches, defined as the amount of energy and elemental space occupied by species and food webs, may help bridge this divide. 2. Here, we ask how the functional traits of species, the environmental conditions of habitats and the spatial scale of analysis jointly determine the characteristics of...

Data from: Pheromone-induced accuracy of nestmate recognition in carpenter ants: simultaneous decrease of Type I and Type II errors

Natacha Rossi, David Baracchi, Martin Giurfa & Patrizia D'Ettorre
The ecological and evolutionary success of social insects relies on their ability to efficiently discriminate between group members and aliens. Nestmate recognition occurs by phenotype matching, the comparison of the referent (colony) phenotype to the one of an encountered individual. Based on the level of dissimilarity between the two, the discriminator accepts or rejects the target. The tolerated degree of mismatch is predicted by the acceptance threshold model, which assumes adaptive threshold shifts depending on...

Data from: Biotic predictors complement models of bat and bird responses to climate and tree diversity in European forests

Luc Barbaro, Eric Allan, Evy Ampoorter, Bastien Castagneyrol, Yohan Charbonnier, Hans De Wandeler, Christian Kerbiriou, Harriet Milligan, Aude Vialatte, Monique Carnol, Marc Deconchat, Pallieter De Smedt, Herve Jactel, Julia Koricheva, Isabelle Le Viol, Bart Muys, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen, Kris Verheyen & Fons Van Der Plas
Bats and birds are key providers of ecosystem services in forests. How climate and habitat jointly shape their communities is well studied, but whether biotic predictors from other trophic levels may improve bird and bat diversity models is less known, especially across large bioclimatic gradients. Here, we achieved multi-taxa surveys in 209 mature forests replicated in six European countries from Spain to Finland, to investigate the importance of biotic predictors (i.e., the abundance or activity...

Data from: Signatures of selection and environmental adaptation across the goat genome post-domestication

Licia Colli, Marco Milanesi, Andrea Talenti, Francesca Bertolini, Minhui Chen, Alessandra Crisà, Kevin Daly, Marcello Del Corvo, Bernt Guldbrandtsen, Johannes A. Lenstra, Ben D. Rosen, Elia Vajana, Gennaro Catillo, Stéphane Joost, Ezequiel Luis Nicolazzi, Estelle Rochat, Max F. Rothschild, Bertrand Servin, Tad S. Sonstegard, Roberto Steri, Curtis P. Van Tassel, Paolo Ajmone-Marsan, Paola Crepaldi, Alessandra Stella & AdaptMap Consortium
Background: Since goat was domesticated 10,000 years ago, many factors have contributed to the differentiation of goat breeds and these are classified mainly into two types: (i) adaptation to different breeding systems and/or purposes and (ii) adaptation to different environments. As a result, approximately 600 goat breeds have developed worldwide; they differ considerably from one another in terms of phenotypic characteristics and are adapted to a wide range of climatic conditions. In this work, we...

Data from: C4 anatomy can evolve via a single developmental change

Marjorie R. Lundgren, Luke T. Dunning, Jill K. Olofsson, Jose J. Moreno Villena, Jacques W. Bouvier, Tammy L. Sage, Roxana Khosravesh, Stefanie Sultmanis, Matt Stata, Brad S. Ripley, Maria S. Vorontsova, Guillaume Besnard, Claire Adams, Nicholas Cuff, Anthony Mapaura, Matheus E. Bianconi, Christine M. Long, Pascal-Antoine Christin, Colin P. Osborne, Roxana Khoshravesh & Jose J. Moreno-Villena
C4 photosynthesis boosts productivity in warm environments. Paradoxically, this complex physiological process evolved independently in numerous plant lineages, despite requiring specialized leaf anatomy. The anatomical modifications underlying C4 evolution have previously been evaluated through interspecific comparisons, which capture numerous changes besides those needed for C4 functionality. Here, we quantify the anatomical changes accompanying the transition between non-C4 and C4 phenotypes by sampling widely across the continuum of leaf anatomical traits in the grass Alloteropsis semialata....

Data from: Longitudinal analysis of impulse control disorders in Parkinson’s disease

Jean-Christophe Corvol, Fanny Artaud, Florence Cormier-Dequaire, Olivier Rascol, Franck Durif, Pascal Derckinderen, Ana-Raquel Marques, Frédéric Bourdain, Jean-Philippe Brandel, Fernando Pico, Lucette Lacomblez, Cecilia Bonnet, Christine Brefel-Courbon, Fabienne Ory-Magne, David Grabli, Stephan Klebe, Graziella Mangone, Hana You, Valérie Mesnages, Pei-Chen Lee, Alexis Brice, Marie Vidailhet & Alexis Elbaz
Objective: To investigate the longitudinal dose-effect relationship between dopamine replacement therapy and impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods: We used data from a multicentre longitudinal cohort of consecutive PD patients with ≤5y disease duration at baseline followed annually up to 5y. ICDs were evaluated during face-to-face semi-structured interviews with movement disorder specialists. Generalized estimating equations Poisson models with robust variance were used to study the association between several time-dependent definitions of dopamine...

Data from: Phenotypic determinants of inter-individual variability of litter consumption rate in a detritivore population

Thibaut Rota, Jérémy Jabiol, Éric Chauvet & Antoine Lecerf
Rota_et_al_2018_Oikos_Data_sets

Data from: Mate-copying for a costly variant in Drosophila melanogaster females

Sabine Nöbel, Etienne Danchin & Guillaume Isabel
Mate-copying is a form of social learning in which witnessing sexual interactions between conspecifics biases an observer individuals’ future mate-choice. Mate-copying exists in many vertebrates, as well as in Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we show that female fruit flies can copy the choice for mutant males [curly wings (Cy) mutants versus wild types (WT)] despite the fact that mating with Cy males induce a significant fitness cost for the observer female. When facing WT and Cy...

Data from: Habitat effects on intra-species variation in functional morphology: evidence from freshwater fish

Fangmin Shuai, Shixiao Yu, Sovan Lek & Xinhui Li
Biotic-environment interactions have long been considered an important factor in functional phenotype differentiation in organisms. The differentiation processes determining functional phenotypes can reveal important mechanisms yielding differences in specific functions of animal traits in the ecosystem. In the present study we examined functional morphological variations in relation to increasing geographic altitude. Six fish species were examined for how environment factors affect intra-specific functional morphology in the subtropical Pearl River in southern China. Functional morphology traits...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Data from: Circadian periodicity in space use by ungulates of temperate regions: how much, when, and why?

Guillaume Peron, Antoine Duparc, Mathieu Garel, Pascal Marchand, Nicolas Morellet, Sonia Said & Anne Loison
1. When they visit and revisit specific areas, animals may reveal what they need from their home range and how they acquire information. The temporal dimension of such movement recursions, i.e., periodicity, is however rarely studied, yet potentially bears a species, population, or individual-specific signature. 2. A recent method allows estimating the contribution of periodic patterns to the variance in a movement path. We applied it to 709 individuals from 5 ungulate species, looking for...

Data from: Developing reduced SNP assays from whole-genome sequence data to estimate introgression in an organism with complex genetic patterns, the Iberian honeybee (Apis mellifera iberiensis)

Dora Henriques, Melanie Parejo, Alain Vignal, David Wragg, Andreas Wallberg, Matthew Webster, M. Alice Pinto & Matthew T. Webster
The most important managed pollinator, the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.), has been subject to a growing number of threats. In Western Europe one such threat is large-scale introductions of commercial strains (C-lineage ancestry), which is leading to introgressive hybridization and even the local extinction of native honeybee populations (M-lineage ancestry). Here, we developed reduced assays of highly informative SNPs from 176 whole genomes to estimate C-lineage introgression in the most diverse and evolutionarily complex subspecies...

Data from: The influence of early-life allocation to antlers on male performance during adulthood: evidence from contrasted populations of a large herbivore

Jean-François Lemaître, Louise Cheynel, Frederic Douhard, Gilles Bourgoin, François Débias, Hubert Ferté, Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont, Sylvia Pardonnet, Maryline Pellerin, Benjamin Rey, Cécile Vanpé, A.J. Mark Hewison, Jean-Michel Gaillard & A. J. Mark Hewison
1. To secure mating opportunities, males often develop and maintain conspicuous traits that are involved in intra-sexual and/or inter-sexual competition. While current models of sexual selection rely on the assumption that producing such traits is costly, quantifying the cost of allocating to secondary sexual traits remains challenging. 2. According to the principle of allocation, high energy allocation to growth or sexual traits in males should lead to reduced energy allocation to the maintenance of cellular...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    19

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    19

Affiliations

  • University of Toulouse
    19
  • University of Adelaide
    3
  • University of British Columbia
    3
  • The Ohio State University
    2
  • Aarhus University
    2
  • University of Lyon System
    2
  • Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • University of Bern
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1