15 Works

Data from: The adaptive potential of Populus balsamifera L. to phenology requirements in a warmer global climate

Matthew S. Olson, Nicholas Levsen, Raju Y. Soolanayakanahally, Robert D. Guy, William R. Schroeder, Stephen R. Keller & Peter Tiffin
The manner in which organisms adapt to climate change informs both a broader understanding of the evolution of biodiversity as well as plans for future conservation and mitigation. We apply common garden and association mapping approaches to quantify genetic variance and identify loci affecting bud flush and bud set, traits that define a tree’s season for height growth, in the boreal forest tree Populus balsamifera L. (balsam poplar). Using data from 478 genotypes grown in...

Data from: High diversity and widespread occurrence of mitotic spore mats in ectomycorrhizal Pezizales

Rosanne A. Healy, Matthew E. Smith, Gregory M. Bonito, Donald H. Pfister, Gonzalo G. Guevara, Caroline Hobart, Leticia Kumar, Thai Lee, Katherine Stafford, Zai-Wei Ge, Rytas Vilgalys, Gwendolyn Williams, James Trappe, David J. McLaughlin &
Fungal mitospores may function as dispersal units and/ or spermatia and thus play a role in distribution and/or mating of species that produce them. Mitospore production in ectomycorrhizal (EcM) Pezizales is rarely reported, but here we document mitospore production by a high diversity of EcM Pezizales on three continents, in both hemispheres. We sequenced the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and partial large subunit (LSU) nuclear rDNA from 292 spore mats (visible mitospore clumps) collected in...

Data from: Interactions between soil habitat and geographic range location affect plant fitness

John Stanton-Geddes, Ruth G. Shaw & Peter Tiffin
Populations are often found on different habitats at different geographic locations. This habitat shift may be due to biased dispersal, physiological tolerances or biotic interactions. To explore how fitness of the native plant Chamaecrista fasciculata depends on habitat within, at and beyond its range edge, we planted seeds from five populations in two soil substrates at these geographic locations. We found that with reduced competition, lifetime fitness was always greater or equivalent in one habitat...

Data from: Role of climate and competitors in limiting fitness across range edges of an annual plant

John Stanton-Geddes, Peter Tiffin & Ruth G. Shaw
It is often assumed that the geographic distributions of species match their climatic tolerances, but this assumption is not frequently tested. Moreover, few studies examine the relative importance of abiotic and biotic factors for limiting species ranges. We combined multiple approaches to assess the extent to which fitness of a widespread native annual legume, Chamaecrista fasciculata decreases at and beyond its northern and western range edges, and how this is influenced by the presence of...

Data from: Deep sequencing of amplicons reveals widespread intraspecific hybridization and multiple origins of polyploidy in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)

Bryce A. Richardson, Justin T. Page, Prabin Bajgain, Stewart C. Sanderson & Joshua A. Udall
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Hybridization has played an important role in the evolution and ecological adaptation in diploid and polyploid plants. Artemisia tridentata (Asteraceae) tetraploids are extremely widespread and of great ecological importance. These tetraploids are often taxonomically identified as A. tridentata ssp. wyomingensis, or as autotetraploids of diploid subspecies tridentata and vaseyana. Few details are available as to how these tetraploids are formed or how they are related to diploid subspecies. METHODS: We used...

Data from: Measuring ectomycorrhizal fungal dispersal: macroecological patterns driven by microscopic propagules

Kabir G. Peay, Max G. Schubert, Nhu H. Nguyen & Thomas D. Bruns
Dispersal plays a prominent role in most conceptual models of community assembly. However, direct measurement of dispersal across a whole community is difficult at ecologically relevant spatial scales. For cryptic organisms, such as fungi and bacteria, the scale and importance of dispersal limitation has become a major point of debate. We use an experimental island biogeographic approach to measure the effects of dispersal limitation on the ecological dynamics of an important group of plant symbionts,...

Data from: Molecular phylogeny of the cyprinid tribe Labeonini (Teleostei: Cypriniformes)

Lei Yang, M. Arunachalam, Tetsuya Sado, Boris A. Levin, Alexander S. Golubtsov, Jörg Freyhof, John P. Friel, Wei-Jen Chen, M. Vincent Hirt, Raja Manickam, Mary K. Agnew, Andrew M. Simons, Kenji Saitoh, Masaki Miya, Richard L. Mayden & Shunping He
The cyprinid tribe Labeonini (sensu Rainboth, 1991) is a large group of freshwater fishes containing around 40 genera and 400 species. They are characterized by an amazing diversity of modifications to their lips and associated structures. In this study, a total of 34 genera and 142 species of putative members of this tribe, which represent most of the generic diversity and more than one third of the species diversity of the group, were sampled and...

Data from: Sex determination meltdown upon biological control introduction of the parasitoid Cotesia rubecula?

Jetske G. De Boer, Bram Kuijper, George E. Heimpel & Leo W. Beukeboom
Natural enemies may go through genetic bottlenecks during the process of biological control introductions. Such bottlenecks are expected to be particularly detrimental in parasitoid Hymenoptera that exhibit complementary sex determination (CSD). CSD is associated with a severe form of inbreeding depression because homozygosity at one or multiple sex loci leads to the production of diploid males that are typically unviable or sterile. We observed that diploid males occur at a relatively high rate (8-13% of...

Data from: The Paleozoic origin of enzymatic lignin decomposition reconstructed from 31 fungal genomes

Dimitrios Floudas, Manfred Binder, Robert Riley, Kerrie Barry, Robert A. Blanchette, Bernard Henrissat, Angel T. Martínez, Robert Ortillar, Joseph W. Spatafora, Jagjit S. Yadav, Andrea Aerts, Isabelle Benoit, Alex Boyd, Alexis Carlson, Alex Copeland, Pedro M. Coutinho, Ronald P. De Vries, Patricia Ferreira, Keisha Findley, Brian Foster, Jill Gaskell, Dylan Glotzer, Paweł Górecki, Joseph Heitman, Cedar Hesse … & David S. Hibbett
Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non–lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstructed as...

Data from: Migration strategy affects avian influenza dynamics in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

Nichola J. Hill, John Y. Takekawa, Joshua T. Ackerman, Keith A. Hobson, Garth Herring, Carol J. Cardona, Jonathan A. Runstadler & Walter M. Boyce
Studies of pathogen transmission typically overlook that wildlife hosts can include both migrant and resident populations when attempting to model circulation. Through the application of stable isotopes in flight feathers, we estimated the migration strategy of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) - resident, intermediate-distance migrant or long-distance migrant, occurring on California wintering grounds. Our study demonstrates that mallards, a principal host of avian influenza virus (AIV) in nature, contribute differently to virus gene flow depending on migration...

Data from: Fitness of Arabidopsis thaliana mutation accumulation lines whose spontaneous mutations are known

Charles B. Fenster, Matthew Thomas Rutter, Angela J. Roles, Jeffrey K. Conner, Ruth G. Shaw, Frank Holcomb Shaw, Korbinian Schneeberger, Stephan Ossowski & Detlef Weigel
Despite the fundamental importance of mutation to the evolutionary process, we have little knowledge of the direct consequences of specific spontaneous mutations to the fitness of the organism. Combining results of whole-genome sequencing with repeated field assays of survival and reproduction, we quantify the combined effects on fitness of spontaneous mutations identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that the effects are beneficial, deleterious or neutral depending on the environmental context. Some lines, bearing mutations disrupting...

Data from: Pollinator-mediated reproductive isolation among dioecious fig species (Ficus, Moraceae)

Annika M. Moe & George D. Weiblen
The extent of isolation among closely related sympatric plant species engaged in obligate pollination mutualisms depends on the fitness consequences of interspecies floral visitation. In figs (Ficus), interspecific gene flow may occur when pollinating wasps (Agaonidae) visit species other than their natal fig species. We studied reproductive isolation in a clade of six sympatric dioecious fig species in New Guinea. Microsatellite genotyping and Bayesian clustering analysis of the fig community indicated strong reproductive barriers among...

Data from: Multilocus coalescence analyses support a mtDNA-based phylogeographic history for a widespread Palearctic passerine bird, Sitta europaea

Chih-Ming Hung, Sergei V. Drovetski & Robert M. Zink
Our understanding of species phylogeography in much of the Palearctic is incomplete. In addition, many existing studies based solely on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can provide a biased view of phylogeographic history because of the effects of lineage sorting, natural selection or hybridization. We analyzed 13 introns to assess a mtDNA study of the Eurasian nuthatch (Sitta europaea) that suggested a seemingly contemporaneous origin of distinct taxa in the Caucasus, Europe, and Asia. Neutrality tests showed...

Data from: How does pollen versus seed dispersal affect niche evolution?

Robin Aguilée, Frank H. Shaw, François Rousset, Ruth G. Shaw & Ophélie Ronce
In heterogeneous landscapes, the genetic and demographic consequences of dispersal influence the evolution of niche width. Unless pollen is limiting, pollen dispersal does not contribute directly to population growth. However, by disrupting local adaptation, it indirectly affects population dynamics. We compare the effect of pollen versus seed dispersal on the evolution of niche width in heterogeneous habitats, explicitly considering the feedback between maladaptation and demography. We consider two scenarios: the secondary contact of two subpopulations,...

Data from: Discordant introgression in a rapidly expanding hybrid swarm

Jessica L. Ward, Mike J. Blum, David M. Walters, Brady A. Porter, Noel Burkhead & Byron Freeman
The erosion of species boundaries can involve rapid evolutionary change. Consequently, many aspects of the process remain poorly understood, including the formation, expansion and evolution of hybrid swarms. Biological invasions involving hybridization present exceptional opportunities to study the erosion of species boundaries because timelines of interactions and outcomes are frequently well known. Here, we examined clinal variation across codominant and maternally inherited genetic markers as well as phenotypic traits to characterize the expansion and evolution...

Registration Year

  • 2012
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Minnesota
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  • Oregon State University
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  • United States Geological Survey
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  • University of Maryland, College Park
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  • Duke University
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  • Department of Plant Biology
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • University of Zaragoza
    1
  • University of Groningen
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  • University of California, Berkeley
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