72 Works

An exotic herbivore reinforces competition between exotic and native plants

Yuzu Sakata & Timothy Craig
Despite increasing evidence that herbivore-mediated indirect effects play a major role in plant competition, it is unclear how and when they contribute to plant invasiveness. The outcomes of herbivore-mediated indirect effects are primarily dependent on the environment and have complex interactions with the direct interactions between plants. We evaluated the herbivore-mediated indirect effects of Solidago altissima (Asteraceae) on other co-occurring native Asteraceae species at multiple sites in a native range [the United States (US)] and...

Pedigree-based and phylogenetic methods support surprising patterns of mutation rate and spectrum in the gray mouse lemur

Ryan Campbell, George Tiley, Jelmer Poelstra, Kelsie Hunnicutt, Peter Larsen, Hui-Jie Lee, Jeffrey Thorne, Mario Dos Reis & Anne Yoder
Mutations are the raw material on which evolution acts, and knowledge of their frequency and genomic distribution is crucial for understanding how evolution operates at both long and short timescales. At present, the rate and spectrum of de novo mutations have been directly characterized in relatively few lineages. Our study provides the first direct mutation rate estimate for a strepsirrhine (i.e., the lemurs and lorises), which comprise nearly half of the primate clade. Using high-coverage...

Wavenumber-space band clipping in nonlinear periodic structures

Weijian Jiao & Stefano Gonella
In weakly nonlinear systems, the main effect of cubic nonlinearity on wave propagation is an amplitude-dependent correction of the dispersion relation. This phenomenon can manifest either as a frequency shift or as a wavenumber shift depending on whether the excitation is prescribed as a initial condition or as a boundary condition, respectively. Several models have been proposed to capture the frequency shifts observed when the system is subjected to harmonic initial excitations. However, these models...

Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy: A Personalized Prediction Tool

Ashwani Jha, Cheongeun Oh, Dale Hesdorffer, Beate Diehl, Sasha Devore, Martin Brodie, Torbjörn Tomson, Josemir W. Sander, Thaddeus S. Walczak & Orrin Devinsky
Objective: To develop and validate a tool for individualised prediction of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) risk, we re-analysed data from one cohort and three case-control studies undertaken 1980-2005. Methods: We entered 1273 epilepsy cases (287 SUDEP, 986 controls) and 22 clinical predictor variables into a Bayesian logistic regression model. Results: Cross-validated individualized model predictions were superior to baseline models developed from only average population risk or from generalised tonic-clonic seizure frequency (pairwise difference...

Exotics are more complementary over time in tree biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiments

Michael Belluau, Alain Paquette, Dominique Gravel, Peter Reich, Artur Stefanski & Christian Messier
Background and aims The Biodiversity – Ecosystem Functioning (BEF) literature proposes that ecosystem functioning increases with biodiversity because of complementarity in resource use among species, associated with functional diversity. In this study, we challenge the trait-based ecology framework by comparing congeneric exotic (European) and native (North American) tree species showing similar resource-use functional trait values. The trait-based framework suggests that two functionally equivalent species should play similar roles in a community, resulting in similar interactions...

Performance and refinement of nitrogen fertilization tools

Curtis Ransom, Jason Clark, Gregory Bean, Christopher Bandura, Matthew Shafer, Newell Kitchen, James Camberato, Paul Carter, Richard Ferguson, Fabián Fernández, David Franzen, Carrie Laboski, David Myers, Emerson Nafziger & John Sawyer
Improving corn (Zea mays L.) N management is pertinent to economic and environmental objectives. However, there are limited comprehensive data sources to develop and test N fertilizer decision aid tools across a wide geographic range of soil and weather scenarios. Therefore, a public-industry partnership was formed to conduct standardized corn N rate response field studies throughout the U.S. Midwest. This research was conducted using a standardized protocol at 49 site-years across eight states over the...

Data from: Consequences of aboveground invasion by non-native plants into restored vernal pools do not prompt changes in belowground processes

Amber Churchill & Akasha Faist
Given the frequent overlap between biological plant invasion and ecological restoration efforts it is important to investigate their interactions to sustain desirable plant communities and modify long-term legacies both above and belowground. To address this relationship, we used natural reference, invaded, and constructed vernal pools in the Central Valley of California to examine potential changes in direct and indirect plant effects on soils associated with biological invasion and active restoration ecosystem disturbances. Our results showed...

Aboveground carbon stocks and dynamics in Andean forests

Alvaro Duque, Miguel Peña, Francisco Cuesta, Sebastián González-Caro, Peter Kennedy, Oliver Phillips, Marco Calderón, Cecilia Blundo, Julieta Carilla, Leslie Cayola, William Farfán-Ríos, Alfredo Fuentes, Ricardo Grau, Jürgen Homeier, María I. Loza-Rivera, Jonathan A. Myers, Oriana Osinaga-Acosta, Manuel Peralvo, Esteban Pinto, Sassan Saatchi, Miles Silman, J. Sebastián Tello, Andrea Terán-Valdez & Kenneth J. Feeley
This dataset (Andean_AGB.xlsx) has the data employed in the paper entitled Old-growth Andean forests as globally important carbon sinks and future carbon refuges. The data was compiled as the results of the work of several research teams spread out across the Andean region. The information available here has data about aboveground carbon stocks and dynamics and the main explanatory variables, such as climate and symbiotic root associations.

Differences in bee community composition between restored and remnant prairies are more strongly linked to forb community differences than landscape differences

Ian Lane, Zachary Portman, Christina Herron-Sweet, Gabriella Pardee & Daniel Cariveau
1. Grassland restoration is an important tool for conserving bee biodiversity within agricultural landscapes. Restorations foster increases in local bee abundance and α-diversity, however, these measures are insufficient for understanding if remnant communities are being conserved. We compared native bee α-diversity, β-diversity, and community composition between restored and remnant prairies in Minnesota, USA. We then investigated two potential drivers of bee community dissimilarity between restored and remnant prairies: proportion of agricultural land surrounding a restoration...

PacBio sequencing output increased through uniform and directional 5-fold concatenation

Celia Blanco, Nisha Kanwar, Irene A. Chen & Burckhard Seelig
Advances in sequencing technology have allowed researchers to sequence DNA with greater ease and at decreasing costs. Main developments have focused on either sequencing many short sequences or fewer large sequences. Methods for sequencing mid-sized sequences of 600-5,000 bp are currently less efficient. For example, the PacBio Sequel I system yields ~100,000-300,000 reads with an accuracy per base pair of 90-99%. We sought to sequence several DNA populations of ~870 bp in length with a...

Biodiversity-productivity relationships are key to nature-based climate solutions

Akira Mori, Laura Dee, Andrew Gonzalez, Haruka Ohashi, Jane Cowles, Alexandra Wright, Michel Loreau, Yann Hautier, Tim Newbold, Peter Reich, Tetsuya Matsui, Wataru Takeuchi, Kei-Ichi Okada, Rupert Seidl & Forest Isbell
The global impacts of biodiversity loss and climate change are interlinked but the feedbacks between them are rarely assessed. Areas with greater tree diversity tend to be more productive, providing a greater carbon sink, and biodiversity loss could reduce these natural C sinks. Here, we quantify how tree and shrub species richness could affect biomass production at biome, national and regional scales. We find that greenhouse gas mitigation could help maintain tree diversity and thereby...

Data from: Sex-specific associations between life history traits and a novel reproductive polymorphism in the Pacific field cricket

Jon Richardson, Justa Heinen-Kay & Marlene Zuk
Associations between heritable polymorphisms and life-history traits, such as development time or reproductive investment, may play an underappreciated role in maintaining polymorphic systems. This is because selection acting on a particular morph could be bolstered or disrupted by correlated changes in life-history or vice versa. In a Hawaiian population of the Pacific field cricket (Teleogryllus oceanicus), a novel mutation (flatwing) on the X-chromosome is responsible for a heritable polymorphism in male wing structure. We used...

Conspecific leaf litter induces negative feedbacks in Asteraceae seedlings

Max Zaret & Briana Whitaker
The plant soil feedback (PSF) framework has been instrumental in quantifying soil microbial impacts on plant fitness and mechanisms for species coexistence. The recent extension of the PSF framework to microbes associated with aboveground tissues of plants, termed here as plant phyllosphere feedbacks (PPFs), can also help determine the role of aboveground microbes as drivers of plant-plant interactions. However, experimental tests of PPFs in wild hosts is nascent and their prevalence across diverse hosts remains...

When text simplification is not enough: Could a graph-based visualization facilitate consumers’ comprehension of dietary supplement information?

Xing He, Rui Zhang, Jordan Alpert, Sicheng Zhou, Terrence Adam, Aantaki Raisa, Yifan Peng, Hansi Zhang, Yi Guo & Jiang Bian
Background: Dietary supplements are widely used. However, dietary supplements are not always safe. For example, an estimated 23,000 emergency room visits every year in the United States were attributed to adverse events related to dietary supplement use. With the rapid development of the Internet, consumers usually seek health information including dietary supplement information online. To help consumers access quality online dietary supplement information, we have identified trustworthy dietary supplement information sources and built an evidence-based...

Data from: Gravity and active acceleration limit the ability of killer flies (Coenosia attenuata) to steer towards prey when attacking from above

Sergio Rossoni, Samuel Fabian, Gregory Sutton & Paloma Gonzalez-Bellido
Insects that predate aerially usually contrast prey against the sky and attack upwards. However, killer flies (Coenosia attenuata) can attack prey flying below them, performing what we term 'aerial dives'. During these dives, killer flies accelerate up to 36 m/s2. Although the trajectories of the killer fly's dives appear highly variable, proportional navigation explains them, as long as the model has the lateral acceleration limit of a real killer fly. The trajectory's steepness is explained...

Migration and tolerance shape host behavior and response to parasites infection

Dongmin Kim & Allison Shaw
Numerous theoretical models have demonstrated that migration, a seasonal animal movement behavior, can minimize the risks and costs of parasite infection. Past work on migration-infection interactions assumes migration is the only strategy available to organisms for dealing with the parasite infection, that is they migrate to a different environment to recover or escape from infection. Thus, migration is similar to the non-spatial strategy of resistance, where hosts prevent infection or kill parasites once infected. However,...

Model data for: Drawdown of atmospheric pCO2 via dynamic particle export stoichiometry in the ocean twilight zone

Tatsuro Tanioka & Katsumi Matsumoto
Understanding the global carbon cycle is key to understanding the climate system. One of the large unknowns is the processes happening in the twilight zone of the ocean. Here, we focus on how elemental stoichiometry of particulate organic matter in the twilight zone affects the strength of the biological pump and atmospheric CO2. We show through modeling that atmospheric CO2 is very sensitive to the change in C:P ratio in the twilight zone. Numerous model...

Integrating socio-ecological suitability with human-wildlife conflict risk: Case study for translocation of a large ungulate

Nicholas McCann, Eric Walberg, James Forester, Michael Schrage, David Fulton & Mark Ditmer
1. Translocations are essential for reestablishing wildlife populations. As they sometimes fail, it is critical to assess factors that influence their success pre-translocation. 2. Socio-ecological suitability models (SESMs) integrate social acceptance and ecological suitability to enable identification of areas where wildlife populations will expand, which makes it likely that SESMs will also be useful for predicting translocation success. 3. To inform site-selection for potential elk (Cervus canadensis) reintroduction to northeastern Minnesota, USA, we developed broad-scale...

Data From: Diversifying bioenergy crops increases yield and yield stability by reducing weed abundance

Jacob Jungers, Yi Yang, Christopher Fernandez, Forest Isbell, Clarence Lehman, Don Wyse & Craig Sheaffer
Relationships between species diversity, productivity, temporal stability of productivity, and plant invasion have been well documented in grasslands, and these relationships could translate to improved agricultural sustainability. However, few studies have explored these relationships in agricultural contexts where fertility and weeds are managed. Using seven years of biomass yield and species composition data from twelve species mixture treatments varying in native species diversity, we found that species richness increased yield and inter-annual yield stability by...

Valuing Cooperation and Constructive Controversy: A Tribute to David W. Johnson

Dean Tjosvold, Daniel Druckman, Roger Johnson, Karl Smith & Cary Roseth

Parole Rules in the United States: Conditions of Parole in Historical Perspective, 1956-2020

Benjamin Wiggins, Edward Rhine, Kelly Mitchell, Bree Crye & Robin Tu
Data set of six censuses of standard conditions of parole that have been conducted between 1956 and 2020

Data from: A test for rate-coupling of trophic and cranial evolutionary dynamics in New World bats

Jeff Shi, Erin Westeen & Daniel Rabosky
Data supporting article Shi et al. 2021, Evolution: https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.14188 Morphological evolution is often assumed to be causally related to underlying patterns of ecological trait evolution. However, few studies have directly tested whether evolutionary dynamics of and major shifts in ecological resource use are coupled with morphological shifts that may facilitate trophic innovation. Using diet and multivariate cranial (microCT) data, we tested whether rates of trophic and cranial evolution are coupled in the radiation of New...

Environmental robustness of the global yeast genetic interaction network

Michael Costanzo, Jing Hou, Vincent Messier, Justin Nelson, Mahfuzur Rahman, Benjamin VanderSluis, Wen Wang, Carles Pons, Catherine Ross, Matej Ušaj, Bryan-Joseph San Luis, Emira Shuteriqi, Elizabeth N. Koch, Patrick Aloy, Chad L. Myers, Charles Boone & Brenda Andrews
Phenotypes associated with genetic variants can be altered by interactions with other genetic variants (GxG), with the environment (GxE), or both (GxGxE). Yeast genetic interactions have been mapped on a global scale, but the environmental influence on the plasticity of genetic networks has not been examined systematically. To assess environmental rewiring of genetic networks, we examined 14 diverse conditions and scored 30,000 functionally representative yeast gene pairs for dynamic, differential interactions. Different conditions revealed novel...

Data from: Enhanced light interception and light use efficiency explain overyielding in young tree communities

Laura Williams, Ethan Butler, Jeannine Cavender-Bares, Artur Stefanski, Karen Rice, Christian Messier, Alain Paquette & Peter Reich
Diverse plant communities are often more productive than mono-specific ones. Several possible mechanisms underlie this phenomenon but their relative importance is unknown. Here we investigated whether light interception alone or in combination with light use efficiency (LUE) of dominant and subordinate species explained greater productivity of mixtures relative to monocultures (i.e. overyielding) in 108 young experimental tree communities. We found mixed-species communities that intercepted more light than their corresponding monocultures had 84% probability of overyielding....

Faculty Engaged Scholarship: Setting Standards and Building Conceptual Clarity

Lynn Blanchard & Andrew Furco

Registration Year

  • 2021
    72

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    68
  • Text
    2
  • Journal Article
    1
  • Report
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Minnesota
    72
  • Duke University
    4
  • University of Notre Dame
    3
  • Virginia Commonwealth University
    3
  • University of Toronto
    3
  • University of British Columbia
    3
  • University of Quebec at Montreal
    2
  • University of Michigan–Ann Arbor
    2
  • Université du Québec en Outaouais
    2
  • University of California, Berkeley
    2