4 Works

Data from: Prioritizing management actions for invasive populations using cost, efficacy, demography, and expert opinion for 14 plant species worldwide

Natalie Z. Kerr, Peter W. J. Baxter, Roberto Salguero-Gomez, Glenda M. Wardle, Yvonne M. Buckley & Peter W.J. Baxter
Management of invasive populations is typically investigated case-by-case. Comparative approaches have been applied to single aspects of management, such as demography, with cost or efficacy rarely incorporated. We present an analysis of the ranks of management actions for 14 species in five countries that extends beyond the use of demography alone to include multiple metrics for ranking management actions, which integrate cost, efficacy and demography (cost-effectiveness) and managers’ expert opinion of ranks. We use content...

Data from: Reproductive biology including evidence for superfetation in the European badger Meles meles (Carnivora: Mustelidae)

Leigh A. L. Corner, Lynsey J. Stuart, David J. Kelly & Nicola M. Marples
The reproductive biology of the European badger (Meles meles) is of wide interest because it is one of the few mammal species that show delayed implantation and one of only five which are suggested to show superfetation as a reproductive strategy. This study aimed to describe the reproductive biology of female Irish badgers with a view to increasing our understanding of the process of delayed implantation and superfetation. We carried out a detailed histological examination...

Data from: Temporal variability of a single population can determine the vulnerability of communities to perturbations

Robert J. Mrowicki, Nessa E. O'Connor & Ian Donohue
Many aspects of global change affect the variability of species population densities, in terms of both the magnitude and pattern of density fluctuations. However, we have limited empirical understanding of the consequences of altered temporal variability of populations, independent of changes in their mean densities, for the structure and stability of natural communities and the responses of ecosystems to additional stressors. We used a field experiment to test the effects of altered temporal variability of...

Data from: Breaking and remaking a seed and seed predator interaction in the introduced range of Scotch Broom (Cytisus scoparius) in New Zealand

Quentin Paynter, Yvonne M. Buckley, Paul Peterson, Allan Hugh Gourlay & Simon V. Fowler
Introduced plants may initially experience enemy release but some of those interactions may be reinstated through biological control. These cases provide opportunities to explore the dynamics of broken and re-made consumer-resource interactions. The European shrub broom (Cytisus scoparius) was introduced to New Zealand without a specialist seed predator (Bruchidius villosus) until a biological control programme reinstated this interaction in 1988. Broom produces substantially larger seeds throughout its non-native range and there are differences in seedling...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Trinity College
    4
  • Queen's University Belfast
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions
    1
  • Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
    1
  • Landcare Research
    1
  • Trinity College Dublin
    1
  • University of Sydney
    1
  • University College Dublin
    1
  • Tufts University
    1