3 Works

Data from: Spatio-temporal dynamics of a tree-killing beetle and its predator

Aaron S. Weed, Matthew P. Ayres, Andrew M. Liebhold & Ronald F. Billings
Resolving linkages between local-scale processes and regional-scale patterns in abundance of interacting species is important for understanding long-term population stability across spatial scales. Landscape patterning in consumer population dynamics may be largely the result of interactions between consumers and their predators, or driven by spatial variation in basal resources. Empirical testing of these alternatives has been limited by the lack of suitable data. In this study, we analyzed an extensive network of spatially replicated time...

Ancient and modern colonization of North America by hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), an invasive insect from East Asia

Nathan P. Havill, Shigehiko Shiyake, Ashley Lamb Galloway, Robert G. Foottit, Guoyue Yu, Annnie Paradis, Joseph Elkinton, Michael E. Montgomery, Masakazu Sano, Adalgisa Caccone & Annie Paradis
Hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae, is an invasive pest of hemlock trees (Tsuga) in eastern North America. We used 14 microsatellites and mitochondrial COI sequences to assess its worldwide genetic structure and reconstruct its colonization history. The resulting information about its life cycle, biogeography and host specialization could help predict invasion by insect herbivores. We identified eight endemic lineages of hemlock adelgids in central China, western China, Ulleung Island (South Korea), western North America, and...

Data from: A cross-continental comparison of plant and beetle responses to retention of forest patches during timber harvest

Susan C. Baker, Charles B. Halpern, Timothy J. Wardlaw, Christel Kern, Graham J. Edgar, Russell J. Thomson, Richard E. Bigley, Jerry F. Franklin, Kamal J.K. Gandhi, Lena Gustafsson, Samuel Johnson, Brian J. Palik, Thomas A. Spies, E. Ashley Steel, Jan Weslien, Joachim Strengbom & Kamal J. K. Gandhi
Timber harvest can adversely affect forest biota. Recent research and application suggest that retention of mature forest elements (‘retention forestry’), including unharvested patches (or ‘aggregates’) within larger harvested units, can benefit biodiversity compared to clearcutting. However, it is unclear whether these benefits can be generalized among the diverse taxa and biomes in which retention forestry is practiced. Lack of comparability in methods for sampling and analysing responses to timber harvest and edge creation presents a...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Northern Research Station
    3
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    3
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Osaka Museum of Natural History
    1
  • Forestry Research Institute of Sweden
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • University of Tasmania
    1
  • Hokkaido University
    1
  • Virginia Tech
    1