6 Works

Data from: Genetic surfing, not allopatric divergence, explains spatial sorting of mitochondrial haplotypes in venomous coralsnakes

Jeffrey W. Streicher, Jay P. McEntee, Laura C. Drzich, Daren C. Card, Drew R. Schield, Utpal Smart, Christopher L. Parkinson, Tereza Jezkova, Eric N. Smith & Todd A. Castoe
Strong spatial sorting of genetic variation in contiguous populations is often explained by local adaptation or secondary contact following allopatric divergence. A third explanation, spatial sorting by stochastic effects of range expansion, has been considered less often though theoretical models suggest it should be widespread, if ephemeral. In a study designed to delimit species within a clade of venomous coralsnakes, we identified an unusual pattern within the Texas coral snake (Micrurus tener): strong spatial sorting...

Data from: The evolution of reproductive diversity in Afrobatrachia: a phylogenetic comparative analysis of an extensive radiation of African frogs

Daniel M. Portik & David C. Blackburn
The reproductive modes of anurans (frogs and toads) are the most diverse of terrestrial vertebrates, and a major challenge is identifying selective factors that promote the evolution or retention of reproductive modes across clades. Terrestrialized anuran breeding strategies have evolved repeatedly from the plesiomorphic fully aquatic reproductive mode, a process thought to occur through intermediate reproductive stages. Several selective forces have been proposed for the evolution of terrestrialized reproductive traits, but factors such as water...

Data from: Predator-driven brain size evolution in natural populations of Trinidadian killifish (Rivulus hartii)

Matthew R. Walsh, Whitnee Broyles, Shannon M. Beston & Stephan B. Munch
Vertebrates exhibit extensive variation in relative brain size. It has long been assumed that this variation is the product of ecologically driven natural selection. Yet, despite more than 100 years of research, the ecological conditions that select for changes in brain size are unclear. Recent laboratory selection experiments showed that selection for larger brains is associated with increased survival in risky environments. Such results lead to the prediction that increased predation should favour increased brain...

Data from: An evaluation of transcriptome-based exon capture for frog phylogenomics across multiple scales of divergence (Class: Amphibia, Order: Anura)

Daniel M. Portik, Lydia L. Smith & Ke Bi
Custom sequence capture experiments are becoming an efficient approach for gathering large sets of orthologous markers in nonmodel organisms. Transcriptome-based exon capture utilizes transcript sequences to design capture probes, typically using a reference genome to identify intron–exon boundaries to exclude shorter exons (<200 bp). Here, we test directly using transcript sequences for probe design, which are often composed of multiple exons of varying lengths. Using 1260 orthologous transcripts, we conducted sequence captures across multiple phylogenetic...

Data from: A suite of potentially amplifiable microsatellite loci for ten reptiles of conservation concern from Africa and Asia

Kyle J. Shaney, Rich Adams, Nia Kurniawan, Amir Hamidy, Eric N. Smith & Todd A. Castoe
Here we document the addition of thousands of potentially amplifiable microsatellite loci (PALs) and associated primer sequences for public use. We conducted whole-genome shotgun sequencing to obtain ultra-low coverage, random genomic sampling from ten African and Asian squamate reptile species (representing ten genera). We used unique genomic processing methods and generated PALs for the following species: Acrochordus granulatus, Ahaetulla prasina, Cerberus rhynchops, Gonocephalus kuhlii, Ophiophagus hannah, Python bivittatus, Tribolonotus gracilis, Trimeresurus sabahi (Popeia sabahi), Uromastyx...

Data from: Local adaptation in transgenerational responses to predators

Matthew R. Walsh, Todd Castoe, Julian Holmes, Michelle Packer, Kelsey Biles, Melissa Walsh, Stephan B. Munch & David M. Post
Environmental signals can induce phenotypic changes that span multiple generations. Along with phenotypic responses that occur during development (i.e., ‘within-generation’ plasticity), such ‘transgenerational plasticity’ (TGP) has been documented in a diverse array of taxa spanning many environmental perturbations. New theory predicts that temporal stability is a key driver of the evolution of TGP. We tested this prediction using natural populations of zooplankton from lakes in Connecticut that span a large gradient in the temporal dynamics...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • The University of Texas at Arlington
    6
  • University of California System
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • National Marine Fisheries Service
    2
  • University of California, Berkeley
    1
  • University of Brawijaya
    1
  • University of Central Florida
    1
  • Indonesian Institute of Sciences
    1
  • University of Arizona
    1
  • Yale University
    1