40 Works

Data from: Dmrt1 polymorphism and sex-chromosome differentiation in Rana temporaria

Nicolas Rodrigues, Tania Studer, Christophe Dufresnes, Wen-Juan Ma, Paris Veltsos & Nicolas Perrin
Sex-determination mechanisms vary both within and among populations of common frogs, opening opportunities to investigate the molecular pathways and ultimate causes shaping their evolution. We investigated the association between sex-chromosome differentiation (as assayed from microsatellites) and polymorphism at the candidate sex-determining gene Dmrt1 in two Alpine populations. Both populations harboured a diversity of X-linked and Y-linked Dmrt1 haplotypes. Some males had fixed male-specific alleles at all markers (“differentiated” Y chromosomes), others only at Dmrt1 (“proto-”...

Data from: Beyond mean allelic effects: a locus at the major color gene MC1R associates also with differing levels of phenotypic and genetic (co)variance for coloration in barn owls

Luis Martin San-Jose, Valérie Ducret, Anne-Lyse Ducrest, Céline Simon & Alexandre Roulin
The mean phenotypic effects of a discovered variant help to predict major aspects of the evolution and inheritance of a phenotype. However, differences in the phenotypic variance associated to distinct genotypes are often overlooked despite being suggestive of processes that largely influence phenotypic evolution, such as interactions between the genotypes with the environment or the genetic background. We present empirical evidence for a mutation at the melanocortin-1-receptor gene, a major vertebrate coloration gene, affecting phenotypic...

Data from: Adaptation to fluctuating environments in a selection experiment with Drosophila melanogaster

Olga Kubrak, Sören Nylin, Thomas Flatt, Dick Nässel & Olof Leimar
A fundamental question in life-history evolution is how organisms cope with fluctuating environments, including variation between stressful and benign conditions. For short-lived organisms, environments commonly vary between generations. Using a novel experimental design, we exposed wild-derived Drosophila melanogaster to three different selection regimes: one where generations alternated between starvation and benign conditions, and starvation was always preceded by early exposure to cold; another where starvation and benign conditions alternated in the same way, but cold...

Data from: Patterns and mechanisms in instances of endosymbiont-induced parthenogenesis

Wen-Juan Ma, Tanja Schwander & W.-J. Ma
Female-producing parthenogenesis can be induced by endosymbionts that increase their transmission by manipulating host reproduction. Our literature survey indicates that such endosymbiont-induced parthenogenesis is known or suspected in 124 host species from seven different arthropod taxa, with Wolbachia as the most frequent endosymbiont (in 56-75% of host species). Most host species (81%, 100 out of 124) are characterized by haplo-diploid sex determination, but a strong ascertainment bias likely underestimates the frequency of endosymbiont-induced parthenogenesis in...

Data from: Adaptation to chronic nutritional stress leads to reduced dependence on microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster

Berra Erkosar, Sylvain Kolly, Jan R. Van Der Meer & Tadeusz J. Kawecki
Numerous studies have shown that animal nutrition is tightly linked to gut microbiota, especially under nutritional stress. In Drosophila melanogaster, microbiota are known to promote juvenile growth, development, and survival on poor diets, mainly through enhanced digestion leading to changes in hormonal signaling. Here, we show that this reliance on microbiota is greatly reduced in replicated Drosophila populations that became genetically adapted to a poor larval diet in the course of over 170 generations of...

Data from: Evolution and comparative ecology of parthenogenesis in haplodiploid arthropods

Casper J. Van Der Kooi, Cyril Matthey-Doret & Tanja Schwander
Changes from sexual reproduction to female-producing parthenogenesis (thelytoky) have great evolutionary and ecological consequences, but how many times parthenogenesis evolved in different animal taxa is unknown. We present the first exhaustive database covering 765 cases of parthenogenesis in haplodiploid arthropods, and estimate frequencies of parthenogenesis in different taxonomic groups. We show that the frequency of parthenogenetic lineages extensively varies among groups (0-38% among genera), that many species have both sexual and parthenogenetic lineages and that...

Data from: Sex differentiation in grayling (Salmonidae) goes through an all-male stage and is delayed in genetic males who instead grow faster

Diane Maitre, Oliver M. Selmoni, Anshu Uppal, Lucas Marques Da Cunha, Laetitia G. E. Wilkins, Julien Roux, Kenyon B. Mobley, Isabelle Castro, Susanne Knörr, Marc Robinson-Rechavi & Claus Wedekind
Fish populations can be threatened by distorted sex ratios that arise during sex differentiation. Here we describe sex differentiation in a wild grayling (Thymallus thymallus) population that suffers from distorted sex ratios. We verified that sex determination is linked to the sex determining locus (sdY) of salmonids. This allowed us to study sex-specific gene expression and gonadal development. Sex-specific gene expression could be observed during embryogenesis and was strong around hatching. About half of the...

Data from: Stallion semen quality depends on MHC matching to teaser mare

Elise Jeannerat, Eliane Marti, Catherine Berney, Fredi Janett, Heinrich Bollwein, Harald Sieme, Dominik Burger & Claus Wedekind
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has repeatedly been found to influence mate choice of vertebrates, with MHC-dissimilar mates typically being preferred over MHC-similar mates. We used horses (Equus caballus) to test whether MHC matching also affects male investment into ejaculates after short exposure to a female. Semen characteristics varied much among stallions. Controlling for this variance with a full-factorial within-subject experimental design, we found that a short exposure to an MHC-dissimilar mare enhanced male plasma...

Data from: Disentangling biotic interactions, environmental filters, and dispersal limitation as drivers of species co-occurrence

Manuela D'Amen, Heidi K. Mod, Nicholas J. Gotelli & Antoine Guisan
A key focus in ecology is to search for community assembly rules. Here we compare two community modelling frameworks that integrate a combination of environmental and spatial data to identify positive and negative species associations from presence-absence matrices, and incorporate an additional comparison using joint species distribution models (JSDM). The frameworks use a dichotomous logic tree that distinguishes dispersal limitation, environmental requirements, and interspecific interactions as causes of segregated or aggregated species pairs. The first...

Data from: Maternal allocation of carotenoids increases tolerance to bacterial infection in brown trout

Laetitia G. E. Wilkins, Lucas Marques Da Cunha, Laure Menin, Daniel Ortiz, Véronique Vocat-Mottier, Matay Hobil, David Nusbaumer & Claus Wedekind
Life-history theory predicts that iteroparous females allocate their resources differently among different breeding seasons depending on their residual reproductive value. In iteroparous salmonids there is typically much variation in egg size, egg number, and in the compounds that females allocate to their clutch. These compounds include various carotenoids whose functions are not sufficiently understood yet. We sampled 37 female and 35 male brown trout from natural streams, collected their gametes for in vitro fertilizations, experimentally...

Data from: Fossils matter: improved estimates of divergence times in Pinus reveal older diversification

Bianca Saladin, Andrew B. Leslie, Rafael O. Wueest, Glenn Litsios, Elena Conti, Nicolas Salamin & Niklaus E. Zimmermann
Background: The taxonomy of pines (genus Pinus) is widely accepted and a robust gene tree based on entire plastome sequences exists. However, there is a large discrepancy in estimated divergence times of major pine clades among existing studies, mainly due to differences in fossil placement and dating methods used. We currently lack a dated molecular phylogeny that makes use of the rich pine fossil record, and this study is the first to estimate the divergence...

Data from: Wood ants produce a potent antimicrobial agent by applying formic acid on tree-collected resin

Timothée Brütsch, Geoffrey Jaffuel, Armelle Vallat, Ted C. J. Turlings & Michel Chapuisat
Wood ants fight pathogens by incorporating tree resin with antimicrobial properties into their nests. They also produce large quantities of formic acid in their venom gland, which they readily spray to defend or disinfect their nest. Mixing chemicals to produce powerful antibiotics is common practice in human medicine, yet evidence for the use of such “defensive cocktails” by animals remains scant. Here, we test the hypothesis that wood ants enhance the antifungal activity of tree...

Data from: Pleiotropic effect of the Flowering Locus C on plant resistance and defence against insect herbivores

Sergio Rasmann, Julia Sanchez Vilas, Gaëtan Glauser, Maria Cartolano, Janne Lempe, Miltos Tsiantis & John R. Pannell
1. Plants vary widely in the extent to which they defend themselves against herbivores. Because the resources available to plants are often site-specific, variation among sites dictates investment into defence, and may reveal a growth-defence trade-off. Moreover, plants that have evolved different life-history strategies in different environments may situate themselves on this trade-off curve differently. For instance, plants that flower later have a longer vegetative lifespan, and may accordingly defend themselves differently than those that...

Data from: Experimental evolution of slowed cognitive aging in Drosophila melanogaster

Martyna K. Zwoinska, Alexei A. Maklakov, Tadeusz J. Kawecki & Brian Hollis
Reproductive output and cognitive performance decline in parallel during aging, but it is unknown whether this reflects a shared genetic architecture or merely the declining force of natural selection acting independently on both traits. We used experimental evolution in Drosophila melanogaster to test for the presence of genetic variation for slowed cognitive aging, and assess its independence from that responsible for other traits’ decline with age. Replicate experimental populations experienced either joint selection on learning...

Data from: Lack of evidence for selection favouring MHC haplotypes that combine high functional diversity

Arnaud Gaigher, Alexandre Roulin, Walid H. Gharib, Pierre Taberlet, Reto Burri & Luca Fumagalli
High rates of gene duplication and the highest levels of functional allelic diversity in vertebrate genomes are the main hallmarks of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), a multigene family with a primordial role in pathogen recognition. The usual tight linkage among MHC gene duplicates may provide an opportunity for the evolution of haplotypes that associate functionally divergent alleles and thus grant the transmission of optimal levels of diversity to coming generations. Even though such associations...

Data from: Less favorable climates constrain demographic strategies in plants

Anna M. Csergo, Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Olivier Broennimann, Shaun R. Coutts, Antoine Guisan, Amy L. Angert, Erik Welk, Iain Stott, Brian J. Enquist, Brian McGill, Jens-Christian Svenning, Cyrille Violle & Yvonne M. Buckley
Correlative species distribution models are based on the observed relationship between species’ occurrence and macroclimate or other environmental variables. In climates predicted less favourable populations are expected to decline, and in favourable climates they are expected to persist. However, little comparative empirical support exists for a relationship between predicted climate suitability and population performance. We found that the performance of 93 populations of 34 plant species worldwide – as measured by in situ population growth...

Data from: Long-term in situ persistence of biodiversity in tropical sky-islands revealed by landscape genomics

Alicia Mastretta-Yanes, Alexander T. Xue, Alejandra Moreno-Letelier, Tove H. Jørgensen, Nadir Alvarez, Daniel Piñero, Brent C. Emerson & Tove H. Jorgensen
Tropical mountains are areas of high species richness and endemism. Two historical phenomena may have contributed to this: (1) fragmentation and isolation of habitats may have promoted the genetic differentiation of populations and increased the possibility of allopatric divergence and speciation, and; (2) the mountain areas may have allowed long-term population persistence during global climate fluctuations. These two phenomena have been studied using either species occurrence data or estimating species divergence times. However, only few...

Data from: Forecasting range shifts of a cold-adapted species under climate change: are genomic and ecological diversity within species crucial for future resilience?

Spyros Theodoridis, Theofania S. Patsiou, Christophe Randin & Elena Conti
Cold-adapted taxa are experiencing severe range shifts due to climate change and are expected to suffer a significant reduction of their climatically suitable habitats in the next few decades. However, it has been proposed that taxa with sufficient standing genetic and ecologic diversity will better withstand climate change. These taxa are typically more broadly distributed in geographic and ecological niche space, therefore they are likely to endure higher levels of populations loss than more restricted,...

Data from: Range expansion compromises adaptive evolution in an outcrossing plant

Santiago C. Gonzalez-Martinez, Kate Ridout & John R. Pannell
Neutral genetic diversity gradients have long been used to infer the colonization history of species, but range expansion may also influence the efficacy of natural selection and patterns of non-synonymous polymorphism in different parts of a species’ range. Recent theory predicts both an accumulation of deleterious mutations and a reduction in the efficacy of positive selection as a result of range expansion. These signatures have been sought in a number of studies of the human...

Data from: HyRAD-X, a versatile method combining exome capture and RAD sequencing to extract genomic information from ancient DNA

Sarah Schmid, Rémi Genevest, Erika Gobet, Tomasz Suchan, Christoph Sperisen, Willy Tinner & Nadir Alvarez
Over the last decade, protocols aimed at reproducibly sequencing reduced-genome subsets in non-model organisms have been widely developed. Their use is however limited to DNA of relatively high molecular weight. During the last year, several methods exploiting hybridization capture using probes based on RAD-sequencing loci have circumvented this limitation and opened avenues to the study of samples characterized by degraded DNA, such as historical specimens. Here, we present a major update to those methods, namely...

Data from: Environmental stress linked to consumption of maternally derived carotenoids in brown trout embryos (Salmo trutta)

Laetitia G. E. Wilkins, Lucas Marques Da Cunha, Gaëtan Glauser, Armelle Vallat & Claus Wedekind
The yellow, orange, or red colors of salmonid eggs are due to maternally derived carotenoids whose functions are not sufficiently understood yet. Here, we studied the significance of naturally acquired carotenoids as maternal environmental effects during embryo development in brown trout (Salmo trutta). We collected eggs from wild females, quantified their egg carotenoid content, fertilized them in vitro in full-factorial breeding blocks to separate maternal from paternal effects, and raised 3,278 embryos singly at various...

Data from: Evidence for mega-landslides as drivers of island colonization

Víctor García-Olivares, Heriberto López, Jairo Patiño, Nadir Alvarez, Antonio Machado, Juan Carlos Carrecedo, Vicente Soler, Brent C. Emerson & Juan Carlos Carracedo
Aim: How non-dispersive taxa colonize islands is generalized as being by wind, or rafting, with the implicit assumption that such events involve one (wind) or a few (rafting) individuals. However, because of the evolutionary time-scale for colonization events, the fit of individual species to a conceptual model of wind or rafting is difficult to assess. Here, we describe an alternative testable geological model for inter-island colonization that can result in larger effective founding population sizes...

Data from: Polydomy enhances foraging performance in ant colonies

Nathalie Stroeymeyt, Patrick Joye & Laurent Keller
Collective foraging confers benefits in terms of reduced predation risk and access to social information, but it heightens local competition when resources are limited. In social insects, resource limitation has been suggested as a possible cause for the typical decrease in per capita productivity observed with increasing colony size, a phenomenon known as Michener's paradox. Polydomy (distribution of a colony's brood and workers across multiple nests) is believed to help circumvent this paradox through its...

Data from: Transcriptomic resources for an endemic Neotropical plant lineage (Gesneriaceae)

Martha Liliana Serrano-Serrano, Anna Marcionetti, Mathieu Perret & Nicolas Salamin
Premise of the study: Despite the extensive phenotypic variation that characterizes the Gesneriaceae family, there is a lack of genomic resources to investigate the molecular basis of their diversity. We developed and compared the transcriptomes for two species of the Neotropical lineage of the Gesneriaceae. Methods and Results: Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly of floral and leaf samples were used to generate multigene sequence data for Sinningia eumorpha and S. magnifica, two species endemic...

Data from: Hummingbird pollination and the diversification of angiosperms: an old and successful association in Gesneriaceae

Martha Liliana Serrano-Serrano, Jonathan Rolland, John Clark, Nicolas Salamin & Mathieu Perret
The effects of specific functional groups of pollinators in the diversification of angiosperms are still to be elucidated. We investigated whether the pollination shifts or the specific association with hummingbirds affected the diversification of a highly diverse angiosperm lineage in the Neotropics. We reconstructed a phylogeny of 583 species from the Gesneriaceae family and detected diversification shifts through time, inferred the timing and amount of transitions among pollinator functional groups, and tested the association between...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    40

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    40

Affiliations

  • University of Lausanne
    40
  • University of Neuchâtel
    4
  • University of Bern
    4
  • University of East Anglia
    3
  • University of Zurich
    3
  • Uppsala University
    3
  • University of Veterinary Medicine Hanover
    2
  • Aarhus University
    2
  • University of Geneva
    2
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    2