371 Works

Data from: Host specialisation and disparate evolution of Pyrenophora teres f. teres on barley and barley grass

Celeste C. Linde & Leon M. Smith
Background Pathogens evolve in an arms race, frequently evolving virulence that defeats resistance genes in their hosts. Infection of multiple hosts may accelerate this virulence evolution. Theory predicts that host diversity affects pathogen diversity, with more diverse hosts expected to harbour more diverse pathogens that reproduce sexually. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the microsatellite (SSR) genetic diversity of the barley leaf pathogen Pyrenophora teres f. teres (Ptt) from barley (monoculture) and barley grass (outbreeding)....

Occupancy patterns of the introduced, predatory sugar glider in Tasmanian forests

Dejan Stojanovic
Introduced mammals pose serious threats to native island fauna, and understanding their distributionis fundamental to evaluating their conservation impact. Introduced sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) are the mainpredator of critically endangered swift parrots (Lathamus discolor) on mainland Tasmania. We surveyed sugar gli-der occurrence over~800 km2in an important swift parrot breeding area, the Southern Forests. During 4–5 vis-its per site, we used call broadcast of predatory owls to elicit sugar glider alarm calls and surveyed 100 sitesduring...

Evolutionary history of Neotropical savannas geographically concentrates species, phylogenetic and functional diversity of lizards

Jessica Fenker, Fabricius M. C. B. Domingos, Leonardo G. Tedeschi, Dan F. Rosauer, Fernanda P. Werneck, Guarino R. Colli, Roger M. D. Ledo, Emanuel M. Fonseca, Adrian A. Garda, Derek Tucker, , Maria F. Breitman, Flavia Soares, Lilian G. Giugliano & Craig Moritz
Supporting information (scripts) to compute diversity and endemism indices copied and available by Dan Rosauer (https ://github.com/DanRosauer/phylospatial). Aim: Understanding where and why species diversity is geographically concentrated remains a challenge in biogeography and macroevolution. This is true for the Cerrado, the most biodiverse tropical savanna in the world, which has experienced profound biodiversity loss. Previous studies have focused on a single metric (species composition), neglecting the fact that ‘species’ within the biome are often composed...

Phylogenomics, biogeography and taxonomic revision of New Guinean pythons (Pythonidae, Leiopython) harvested for international trade

Damien Esquerre, Daniel J. D. Natusch, Jessica A. Lyons, Amir Hamidy, Alan R. Lemmon, Emily M. Lemmon, Awal Riyanto, J. Scott Keogh & Stephen Donnellan
The large and enigmatic New Guinean pythons in the genus Leiopython are harvested from the wild to supply the international trade in pets. Six species are currently recognized (albertisii, biakensis, fredparkeri, huonensis, meridionalis, montanus) but the taxonomy of this group has been controversial. We combined analysis of 421 nuclear loci and complete mitochondrial genomes with morphological data to construct a detailed phylogeny of this group, understand their biogeographic patterns and establish the systematic diversity of...

Data from: Congruence and conflict in the higher-level phylogenetics of squamate reptiles: an expanded phylogenomic perspective

Sonal Singhal, Timothy Colston, Maggie Grundler, Stephen Smith, Gabriel Costa, Guarino Colli, Craig Moritz, Alexander Pyron & Daniel Rabosky
Genome-scale data have the potential to clarify phylogenetic relationships across the tree of life, but have also revealed extensive gene tree conflict. This seeming paradox, whereby larger datasets both increase statistical confidence and uncover significant discordance, suggests that understanding sources of conflict is important for accurate reconstruction of evolutionary history. We explore this paradox in squamate reptiles, the vertebrate clade comprising lizards, snakes, and amphisbaenians. We collected an average of 5103 loci for 91 species...

Data for Analysis of Keystone Predation - trait based or driven by extrinsic processes?

Bruce Menge, Melissa Foley, Matthew Robart, Erin Richmond, Mae Noble & Francis Chan
Keystone predation can be a determinant of community structure, including species diversity, but factors underlying “keystoneness” have been minimally explored. Using the system in which the original keystone, the sea star Pisaster ochraceus, was discovered, we focused on two potential (but overlapping) determinants of keystoneness: intrinsic traits or state variables of the species (e.g., size, density), and extrinsic environmental parameters (e.g., prey productivity) that may provide conditions favorable for keystone predator evolution. Using a comparative-experimental...

Supplementary data for: Primate phylogenomics uncovers multiple rapid radiations and ancient interspecific introgression

Dan Vanderpool, Bin Quang Minh, Robert Lanfear, Daniel Hughes, Shwetha Murali, R. Alan Harris, Muthuswamy Raveendran, Donna M. Muzny, Richard A. Gibbs, Kim C. Worley, Jeffrey Rogers, Matthew W. Hahn, Mark S. Hibbins & Robert J. Williamson
Our understanding of the evolutionary history of primates is undergoing continual revision due to ongoing genome sequencing efforts. Bolstered by growing fossil evidence, these data have led to increased acceptance of once controversial hypotheses regarding phylogenetic relationships, hybridization and introgression, and the biogeographical history of primate groups. Among these findings is a pattern of recent introgression between species within all major primate groups examined to date, though little is known about introgression deeper in time....

Linking behavioural thermoregulation, boldness and individual state in male Carpetan rock lizards

Gergely Horváth, Octavio Jiménez-Robles, José Martín, Pilar López, Ignacio De La Riva & Gábor Herczeg
Mechanisms affecting consistent inter-individual behavioural variation (i.e. animal personality) are of wide scientific interest. In poikilotherms, ambient temperature is one of the most important environmental factors with a direct link to a variety of fitness-related traits. Recent empirical evidence suggests that individual differences in boldness are linked to behavioural thermoregulation strategy in heliothermic species, as individuals are regularly exposed to predators during basking. Here, we tested for links between behavioural thermoregulation strategy, boldness and individual...

Data from: From cryptic to colourful: evolutionary decoupling of larval and adult colour in butterflies

Iliana Medina, Regina Vega-Trejo, Thomas Wallenius, Matthew Symonds & Devi Stuart-Fox
Many animals undergo complete metamorphosis, where larval forms change abruptly in adulthood. Colour change during ontogeny is common, but there is little understanding of evolutionary patterns in these changes. Here we use data on larval and adult colour for 246 butterfly species (61% of all species in Australia) to test whether the evolution of colour is coupled between life stages. We show that adults are more variable in colour across species than caterpillars and that...

Data from: No link between nymph and adult colouration in shield bugs: weak selection by predators

Iliana Medina, Regina Vega-Trejo, Thomas Wallenius, Damien Esquerre, Constanza Leon, Daniela Perez & Megan Head
Many organisms use different anti-predator strategies throughout their life, but little is known about the reasons or implications of such changes. For years it has been suggested that selection by predators should favour uniformity in local warning signals. If this is the case, we would expect high resemblance in colour across life stages in aposematic animals where young and adults share similar morphology and habitat. In this study we used shield bugs (Hemiptera: Pentatomoidea) to...

Data from: Pollinator specificity drives strong prepollination reproductive isolation in sympatric sexually deceptive orchids

Michael Whitehead, Rod Peakall & Michael R. Whitehead
Few studies have quantified the full range of pre– and postzygotic barriers that limit introgression between closely related plant species. Here we assess the strength of four isolating mechanisms operating between two morphologically similar and very closely related sympatric orchid taxa, Chiloglottis valida and C. aff. jeanesii. Each taxon sexually attracts its specific wasp pollinator via distinct floral volatile chemistry. Behavioral experiments with flowers and synthetic versions of their floral volatiles confirmed that very strong...

Data from: Prolific observer bias in the life sciences: why we need blind data recording

Luke Holman, Megan L. Head, Robert Lanfear & Michael D. Jennions
Observer bias and other “experimenter effects” occur when researchers’ expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work “blind,” meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence...

Data from: The role of phylogeny and ecology in shaping morphology in 21 genera and 127 species of Australo-Papuan myobatrachid frogs

M. Vidal-García, P. G. Byrne, J. D. Roberts & J. S. Keogh
Body shape is predicted to differ among species for functional reasons and in relation to environmental niche and phylogenetic history. We quantified morphological differences in shape and size among 98.5% of the 129 species and all 21 genera of the Australo-Papuan endemic myobatrachid frogs to test the hypothesis that habitat type predicts body shape in this radiation. We tested this hypothesis in a phylogenetic context at two taxonomic levels: across the entire radiation and within...

Data from: Population-level consequences of risky dispersal

Allison K. Shaw, Matti Jalasvuori & Hanna Kokko
Achieving sufficient connectivity between populations is essential for persistence, but costs of dispersal may select against individual traits or behaviours that, if present, would improve connectivity. Existing dispersal models tend to ignore the multitude of risks to individuals: while many assess the effect of mortality costs, there is also a risk of failing to find new habitat, especially when the entire inhabitable area remains both small and fragmented. There are few known rules governing whether...

Data from: Coevolutionary dynamics of polyandry and sex-linked meiotic drive

Luke Holman, Thomas A. R. Price, Nina Wedell & Hanna Kokko
Segregation distorters located on sex chromosomes are predicted to sweep to fixation and cause extinction via a shortage of one sex, but in nature they are often found at low, stable frequencies. One potential resolution to this long-standing puzzle involves female multiple mating (polyandry). Because many meiotic drivers severely reduce the sperm competitive ability of their male carriers, females are predicted to evolve more frequent polyandry and thereby promote sperm competition when a meiotic driver...

Data from: Clock model makes a large difference to age estimates of long-stemmed clades with no internal calibration: a test using Australian grasstrees

Michael D. Crisp, Nate B. Hardy & Lyn G. Cook
Background: Estimating divergence times in phylogenies using a molecular clock depends on accurate modeling of nucleotide substitution rates in DNA sequences. Rate heterogeneity among lineages is likely to affect estimates, especially in lineages with long stems and short crowns (“broom” clades) and no internal calibration. We evaluate the performance of the random local clocks model (RLC) and the more routinely employed uncorrelated lognormal relaxed clock model (UCLN) in situations in which a significant rate shift...

Data from: Prediction of phylogeographic endemism in an environmentally complex biome.

Ana Carolina Carnaval, Eric Waltari, Miguel T. Rodrigues, Dan Rosauer, Jeremy VanDerWal, Roberta Damasceno, Ivan Prates, Maria Strangas, Zoe Spanos, Danielle Rivera, Marcio R. Pie, Carina R. Firkowski, Marcos R. Bornschein, Luiz F. Ribeiro & Craig Moritz
Phylogeographic endemism, the degree to which the history of recently evolved lineages is spatially restricted, reflects fundamental evolutionary processes such as cryptic divergence, adaptation and biological responses to environmental heterogeneity. Attempts to explain the extraordinary diversity of the tropics, which often includes deep phylogeographic structure, frequently invoke interactions of climate variability across space, time and topography. To evaluate historical versus contemporary drivers of phylogeographic endemism in a tropical system, we analyse the effects of current...

Data from: Mismatch in the distribution of floral ecotypes and pollinators: insights into the evolution of sexually deceptive orchids

Ryan D. Phillips, Bjorn Bohman, Janet M. Anthony, Siegfried L. Krauss, Kingsley W. Dixon & Rod Peakall
Plants are predicted to show floral adaptation to geographic variation in the most effective pollinator, potentially leading to reproductive isolation and genetic divergence. Many sexually deceptive orchids attract just a single pollinator species, limiting opportunities to experimentally investigate pollinator switching. Here we investigate Drakaea concolor, which attracts two pollinator species. Using pollinator choice tests, we detected two morphologically similar ecotypes within D. concolor. The common ecotype only attracted Zaspilothynnus gilesi, while the rare ecotype also...

Data from: Genes associated with ant social behavior show distinct transcriptional and evolutionary patterns

Timothy Linksvayer, Alexander Mikheyev, Timothy A Linksvayer & Alexander S Mikheyev
MySQL database for gene expression analysisMySQL database for the transcriptional, network connectedness, molecular evolution, and GO term analysismonomorium_2014-12-08.sql.gzData tables from MySQL database for gene expression analysisseparated data tables from MySQL database as zipped .csv files for the transcriptional, network connectedness, molecular evolution, and GO term analysismonomorium tables.zipdata summary by genesummary of data listed by M. pharaonis gene in comma deliminated (.csv) format. Header line with variables: gene is the M. pharaonis gene name; SINV homolog...

Data from: The extent and consequences of p-hacking in science

Megan L. Head, Luke Holman, Rob Lanfear, Andrew T. Kahn & Michael D. Jennions
A focus on novel, confirmatory, and statistically significant results leads to substantial bias in the scientific literature. One type of bias, known as “p-hacking,” occurs when researchers collect or select data or statistical analyses until nonsignificant results become significant. Here, we use text-mining to demonstrate that p-hacking is widespread throughout science. We then illustrate how one can test for p-hacking when performing a meta-analysis and show that, while p-hacking is probably common, its effect seems...

Data from: Exon capture phylogenomics: efficacy across scales of divergence

Jason G. Bragg, Sally Potter, Ke Bi & Craig Moritz
The evolutionary histories of species are not measured directly, but estimated using genealogies inferred for particular loci. Individual loci can have discordant histories, but in general we expect to infer evolutionary histories more accurately as more of the genome is sampled. High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) is now providing opportunities to incorporate thousands of loci in ‘phylogenomic’ studies. Here, we used target enrichment to sequence c.3000 protein-coding exons in a group of Australian skink lizards (crown...

Data from: Bet hedging via multiple mating: a meta-analysis

Luke Holman
Polyandry has been hypothesized to allow females to “bet hedge” against mating only with unsuitable mates, reducing variance in offspring fitness between members of a polyandrous lineage relative to a single-mating one. Theoretically, this reduction in fitness variance could select for polyandrous genotypes even when polyandry carries a direct cost, especially in small populations. However, this hypothesis is controversial and difficult to test empirically. Here, I apply a novel simulation model to 49 published empirical...

Data from: Is specialization an evolutionary dead-end? Testing for differences in speciation, extinction and trait transition rates across diverse phylogenies of specialists and generalists.

Emma Day, Xia Hua, Lindell Bromham & E. H. Day
Specialization has often been claimed to be an evolutionary dead end, with specialist lineages having a reduced capacity to persist or diversify. In a phylogenetic comparative framework, an evolutionary dead end may be detectable from the phylogenetic distribution of specialists, if specialists rarely give rise to large, diverse clades. Previous phylogenetic studies of the influence of specialization on macroevolutionary processes have demonstrated a range of patterns, including examples where specialists have both higher and lower...

Data from: Do female Nicrophorus vespilloides reduce direct costs by choosing males that mate less frequently?

Paul E. Hopwood, Geoffrey P. F. Mazué, Mauricio J. Carter, Megan L. Head, Allen J. Moore & Nick J. Royle
Sexual conflict occurs when selection to maximize fitness in one sex does so at the expense of the other sex. In the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides, repeated mating provides assurance of paternity at a direct cost to female reproductive productivity. To reduce this cost, females could choose males with low repeated mating rates or smaller, servile males. We tested this by offering females a dichotomous choice between males from lines selected for high or low...

Data from: Tropical specialist versus climate generalist: diversification and demographic history of sister species of Carlia skinks from northwestern Australia

Ana Catarina Afonso Silva, Jason G. Bragg, Sally Potter, Carlos Fernandes, Maria Manuela Coelho & Craig Moritz
Species endemic to the tropical regions are expected to be vulnerable to future climate change due in part to their relatively narrow climatic niches. In addition, these species are more likely to have responded strongly to past climatic change, and this can be explored through phylogeographic analyses. To test the hypothesis that tropical specialists are more sensitive to climate change than climate generalists, we generated and analyze sequence data from mtDNA and ~2500 exons to...

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