487 Works

South Queensland Eastern Australia Linkage - ARC Discovery Grant DP120103673

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This array is part of the WOMBAT rolling array. This array was completed in 2 parts. 47 instruments were installed in the eastern half of the array from 2012 and 52 instruments were installed in 2013 over the western half of the array. Instruments were short-period (Lennartz 3D-Lite MkII) seismometers and LPR200 recorders. Station spacing is approximately 50 km. Funding was provided by the Australian Research Council as part of a Discovery Project DP120103673 and...

MULGA NT Array

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A three-month, five-station array targeting aftershocks of the May 20 2016 Peterson Ranges earthquake via 250hz short period sensors.

The National Mission for Future Crop and Community Resilience

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A 5.3-million-year history of monsoonal precipitation in northwestern Australia

Jan-Berend Willem Stuut , Patrick De Deckker , Mariem Saavedra-Pellitero , Franck Bassinot , Anna Joy Drury , Maureen Walczak & Kana Nagashima
NIOZ - Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, and Utrecht University, Texel, the Netherlands (1); MARUM – Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, Bremen University, Bremen, Germany (2); Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands (3); ANU – Australian National University, Research School of Earth Sciences, Canberra, Australia (4); School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences at University of Birmingham, Edgbaston Birmingham, United Kingdom (5); LSCE - Laboratoire des Sciences du...

High-resolution scans of Bentheimer sandstone core for imbibition experiments

Ruotong Huang, Anna Herring & Adrian Sheppard
Scans of strongly-wet Bentheimer sandstone core acquired during primary imbibition experiments at voxel size equal to 0.001657314 mm=1.657314 micron. The dimension of all the data set is 1200 voxel*1200 voxel*5000 voxel, corresponding to a physical volume of 32.77 mm^3. A total of four sets of tomographic data are presented in this project, including a 'dry scan' acquired before the water-flooding experiment, and three sets of 'wet scan' acquired during the primary imbibition experiment, with the...

Population genomics and sexual signals identify reproductive interference in Uperoleia

Renee Catullo, Frederick Jaya, Jessie Tanner, Michael Whitehead, Paul Doughty, Scott Keogh & Craig Moritz
When closely related species come into contact via range expansion, both may experience reduced fitness as a result of the interaction. Selection is expected to favor traits that minimize costly interspecies reproductive interactions (such as mismating) via a phenomenon called reproductive character displacement (RCD). Research on RCD frequently assumes secondary contact between species, but the geographic history of species interactions is often unknown. Landscape genomic data allows tests of geographic hypotheses about species origins and...

Data from: Cryptic lineage diversity, body size divergence and sympatry in a species complex of Australian lizards (Gehyra)

Craig C. Moritz, Renae C. Pratt, Sarah Bank, Gayleen Bourke, Jason G. Bragg, Paul Doughty, J. Scott Keogh, Rebecca J. Laver, Sally Potter, Luisa C. Teasdale, Leonardo G. Tedeschi & Paul M. Oliver
Understanding the joint evolutionary and ecological underpinnings of sympatry among close relatives remains a key challenge in biology. This problem can be addressed through joint phylogenomic and phenotypic analysis of complexes of closely related lineages within, and across, species and hence representing the speciation continuum. For a complex of tropical geckos from northern Australia – Gehyra nana and close relatives – we combine mtDNA phylogeography, exon-capture sequencing and morphological data to resolve independently evolving lineages...

Data from: The evolution of queen pheromones in the ant genus Lasius

Luke Holman, Robert Lanfear & Patrizia D'Ettorre
Queen pheromones are among the most important chemical messages regulating insect societies yet they remain largely undiscovered, hindering research into interesting proximate and ultimate questions. Identifying queen pheromones in multiple species would give new insight into the selective pressures and evolutionary constraints acting on these ubiquitous signals. Here, we present experimental and phylogenetic evidence that 3-methylalkanes, hydrocarbons present on the queen’s cuticle, are a queen pheromone throughout the ant genus Lasius. Phylogenetic analyses of the...

Data from: Parental effects alter the adaptive value of an adult behavioural trait

Rebecca M. Kilner, Giuseppe Boncoraglio, Jono M. Henshaw, Benjamin J. M. Jarrett, Ornela De Gasperin, Hanna Kokko, Benjamin JM Jarrett, Alfredo Attisano & Jonathan M Henshaw
The parents' phenotype, or the environment they create for their young, can have long-lasting effects on their offspring, with profound evolutionary consequences. Yet virtually no work has considered how such parental effects might change the adaptive value of behavioural traits expressed by offspring upon reaching adulthood. To address this problem, we combined experiments on burying beetles (Nicrophorus vespilloides) with theoretical modelling, and focussed on one adult behavioural trait in particular: the supply of parental care....

Data from: Logging and fire regimes alter plant communities

Elle J. Bowd, David B. Lindenmayer, Sam C. Banks & David P. Blair
Disturbances are key drivers of plant community composition, structure and function. Plant functional traits, including life forms and reproductive strategies are critical to the resilience and resistance of plant communities in the event of disturbance. Climate change and increasing anthropogenic disturbance are altering natural disturbance regimes, globally. When these regimes shift beyond the adaptive resilience of plant functional traits, local populations and ecosystem functions can become compromised. We tested the influence of multiple disturbances, of...

Data from: “Direct PCR” optimization yields a rapid, cost-effective, non-destructive, and efficient method for obtaining DNA barcodes without DNA extraction

Wing Hing Wong, Ywee Chieh Tay, Jayanthi Puniamoorthy, Michael Balke, Peter S. Cranston & Rudolf Meier
Macroinvertebrates that are collected in large numbers pose major problems in basic and applied biodiversity research: identification to species via morphology is often difficult, slow, and/or expensive. DNA barcodes are an attractive alternative or complementary source of information. Unfortunately obtaining DNA barcodes from specimens requires many steps and thus time and money. Here, we promote a short-cut to DNA barcoding; i.e., a non-destructive PCR method that skips DNA extraction (“direct PCR”) and that can be...

Data from: Measuring CO2 and HCO3- permeabilities of isolated chloroplasts using a MIMS-18O approach

Dimitri Tolleter, Vincent Chochois, Richard Poiré, G. Dean Price & Murray R. Badger
To support photosynthetic CO2 fixation by Rubisco, the chloroplast must be fed with inorganic carbon in the form of CO2 or bicarbonate. However, the mechanisms allowing the rapid passage of this gas and this charged molecule through the bounding membranes of the chloroplast envelope are not yet completely elucidated. We describe here a method allowing us to measure the permeability of these two molecules through the chloroplast envelope using a membrane inlet mass spectrometer and...

Data from: Relative costs of offspring sex and offspring survival in a polygynous mammal

Hannah Froy, Craig A. Walling, Josephine M. Pemberton, Tim H. Clutton-Brock, Loeske E.B. Kruuk & Loeske E. B. Kruuk
Costs of reproduction are expected to be ubiquitous in wild animal populations and understanding the drivers of variation in these costs is an important aspect of life-history evolution theory. We use a 43 year dataset from a wild population of red deer to examine the relative importance of two factors that influence the costs of reproduction to mothers, and to test whether these costs vary with changing ecological conditions. Like previous studies, our analyses indicate...

Data from: Why does inbreeding reduce male paternity? Effects on sexually selected traits

Jason N. Marsh, Regina Vega-Trejo, Michael Dawson Jennions & Megan L. Head
Why does inbreeding reduce paternity? Effects on sexually selected traitsThis is the data associated with the manuscript "Why does inbreeding reduce paternity? Effects on sexually selected traits". The data file contains 5 worksheets. The first "association data" contains data from experiment 1 of the associated paper looking at female association time with inbred and outbred males. The second third and fourth contain data associated with the second experiment of the associated paper looking at the...

Mistletoes could moderate drought impacts on woodland birds, but are themselves susceptible to drought-induced dieback

Ross Crates
Mistletoes are hemiparasitic plants and keystone species in many ecosystems globally. Given predicted increases in drought frequency and intensity, mistletoes may be crucial for moderating drought impacts on community structure. Dependent on host vascular flows, mistletoes can succumb to stress when water availability falls, making them susceptible to mortality during drought. We counted mistletoe across >350,000 km2 of south-eastern Australia and conducted standardised bird surveys between 2016 and 2021, spanning a major drought event in...

Swift parrot data including the sex of offspring and their hatch order

Robert Heinsohn
Most species produce equal numbers of sons and daughters, and sex differences in survival after parental care do not usually affect this pattern. Temporary overproduction of the scarcer sex can be adaptive when generations overlap, the sexes differ in life history expectations, and parents can anticipate future mating opportunities. However an alternative strategy of maximising the competitiveness of the more abundant sex in these circumstances remains unexplored. We develop theory showing how mothers can maximise...

Data from: Model-based ordination for species with unequal niche widths

Bert Van Der Veen, Francis K.C. Hui, Knut A. Hovstad, Erik B. Solbu & Robert B. O'Hara
It is common practice for ecologists to examine species niches in the study of community composition. The response curve of a species in the fundamental niche is usually assumed to be quadratic. The center of a quadratic curve represents a species' optimal environmental conditions, and the width its ability to tolerate deviations from the optimum. Most multivariate methods assume species respond linearly to the environment of the niche, or with a quadratic curve that is...

Evolving thermal thresholds explain the distribution of temperature sex reversal in an Australian dragon lizard

Meghan Castelli, Arthur Georges, Caitlin Cherryh, Dan Rosauer, Stephen Sarre, Isabella Contador-Kelsall & Clare Holleley
Aim: Species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) are particularly vulnerable to climate change because a resultant skew in population sex ratio can have severe demographic consequences and increase vulnerability to local extinction. The Australian central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) has a thermosensitive ZZ male/ZW female system of genetic sex determination (GSD). High incubation temperatures cause reversal of the ZZ genotype to a viable female phenotype. Nest temperatures in the wild are predicted to vary on...

Plant traits measured for Australian alpine plants

Meena Sivagowre Sritharan
Rapid evolution is likely to be an important mechanism allowing native species to adapt to changed environmental conditions. Many northern hemisphere species have undergone substantial recent changes in phenology and morphology. However, we have little information about how native species in the southern hemisphere are responding to climate change. We used herbarium specimens from 21 native alpine plant species in Kosciuszko National Park, Australia to make over 1500 measurements of plant size, leaf thickness, leaf...

R script with data for vegetation and macropod scat analysis

Matthew Chard
Fire and herbivores alter vegetation structure and function. Future fire activity is predicted to increase, and quantifying changes in vegetation communities arising from post-fire herbivory is needed to better manage natural environments. We investigated the effects of post-fire herbivory on understory plant communities in a coastal eucalypt forest in south-eastern Australia. We quantified herbivore activity, understory plant diversity, and dominant plant morphology following a wildfire in 2017 using two sizes of exclosures. Statistical analysis incorporated...

Disentangling the effects of male age and mating history: contrasting effects of mating history on pre-copulatory mating behaviour and paternity success

Upama Aich
Many studies ask whether older males are better at acquiring mates. Even so, how age affects reproductive success is still poorly understood because male age and mating history are confounded in most studies: older males usually have more mating experience. To what extent does mating history rather than age explain variation in male mating success? And how do mating history and male age determine paternity when there is also post-copulatory sexual selection? Here we experimentally...

Data from: Disturbance alters the forest soil microbiome

Elle Bowd
Billions of microorganisms perform critical below-ground functions in all terrestrial ecosystems. While largely invisible to the naked eye, they support all higher lifeforms, form symbiotic relationships with ~90% of terrestrial plant species, stabilize soils, and facilitate biogeochemical cycles. Global increases in the frequency of disturbances are driving major changes in the structure and function of forests. However, despite their functional significance, the disturbance responses of forest microbial communities are poorly understood. Here we explore the...

Table of C4 model equations used to explore the effect of irradiance, CO2 and temperature on C4 photosynthesis

Susanne Von Caemmerer
C4 plants play a key role in world agriculture. For example, C4 crops such as maize and sorghum are major contributors to both first and third world food production and the C4 grasses sugarcane, miscanthus and switchgrass are major plant sources of bioenergy. In the challenge to manipulate and enhance C4 photosynthesis, steady state models of leaf photosynthesis provide an important tool for gas exchange analysis and thought experiments that can explore photosynthetic pathway changes....

Novel Mantle flow retrodictions reveal preferential material flow in the sublithospheric European mantle

Hans-Peter Bunge, Siavash Ghelichkhan & Jens Oeser
The Cenozoic tectonic evolution of Northern Europe involves a number of events that are difficult to reconcile with an intra-plate setting, including magmatic events and topographic changes that are located far from plate boundaries. It is entirely plausible to relate these events to sublithospheric processes in a vigorously convecting mantle. However, traditional mantle convection models are difficult to link to the spatiotemporal constraints provided by geologic archives, because their output invariably depends on the assumptions...

Safe, Risk-Free, Standardised Food for All, Is That What We Will Eat Tomorrow?

Penny Wilson

Registration Year

  • 2022
    58
  • 2021
    62
  • 2020
    53
  • 2019
    36
  • 2018
    56
  • 2017
    53
  • 2016
    43
  • 2015
    44
  • 2014
    31
  • 2013
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    466
  • Text
    9
  • Output Management Plan
    7
  • Report
    2
  • Journal Article
    1
  • Other
    1
  • Preprint
    1

Affiliations

  • Australian National University
    472
  • University of Melbourne
    22
  • Macquarie University
    19
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    19
  • University of Sydney
    17
  • Australian National University (ANU, Australia)
    14
  • James Cook University
    14
  • University of Edinburgh
    12
  • University of Exeter
    12
  • University of California, Berkeley
    11