44 Works

Data from: Parental effects alter the adaptive value of an adult behavioural trait

Rebecca M. Kilner, Giuseppe Boncoraglio, Jono M. Henshaw, Benjamin J. M. Jarrett, Ornela De Gasperin, Hanna Kokko, Benjamin JM Jarrett, Alfredo Attisano & Jonathan M Henshaw
The parents' phenotype, or the environment they create for their young, can have long-lasting effects on their offspring, with profound evolutionary consequences. Yet virtually no work has considered how such parental effects might change the adaptive value of behavioural traits expressed by offspring upon reaching adulthood. To address this problem, we combined experiments on burying beetles (Nicrophorus vespilloides) with theoretical modelling, and focussed on one adult behavioural trait in particular: the supply of parental care....

Data from: Fine-scale refuges can buffer demographic and genetic processes against short-term climatic variation and disturbance: a 22 year case study of an arboreal marsupial

Sam C. Banks, Thibault Lorin, Robyn E. Shaw, Lachlan McBurney, David Blair, Michaela D. J. Blyton, Annabel L. Smith, Jennifer C. Pierson, David B. Lindenmayer & Michaela D.J. Blyton
Ecological disturbance and climate are key drivers of temporal dynamics in the demography and genetic diversity of natural populations. Microscale refuges are known to buffer species’ persistence against environmental change, but the effects of such refuges on demographic and genetic patterns in response to short-term environmental variation are poorly understood. We quantified demographic and genetic responses of mountain brushtail possums (Trichosurus cunninghami) to rainfall variability (1992–2013) and to a major wildfire. We hypothesized that there...

Data from: Characterization of the placoderm (Gnathostomata) assemblage from the tetrapod-bearing locality of Strud (Belgium, Upper Famennian)

Sébastien Olive, Gaël Clément, Edward B. Daeschler & Vincent Dupret
The placoderm fauna of the late Famennian tetrapod-bearing locality of Strud, Belgium, is studied on the basis of historical and newly collected material. It includes the previously described antiarch Grossilepis rikiki, the groenlandaspidid Turrisaspis strudensis sp. nov. and the actinolepidoideid Phyllolepis undulata. P. undulata is thoroughly described and joins the list of the valid Phyllolepis species confidently diagnosed. A morphometrical analysis performed on the centronuchal and anterior ventrolateral plates of the Phyllolepis material demonstrates that...

Data from: An informational diversity framework, illustrated with sexually deceptive orchids in early stages of speciation

Peter E. Smouse, Michael R. Whitehead & Rod Peakall
Reconstructing evolutionary history for emerging species complexes is notoriously difficult, with newly isolated taxa often morphologically cryptic and the signature of reproductive isolation often restricted to a few genes. Evidence from multiple loci and genomes is highly desirable, but multiple inputs require ‘common currency’ translation. Here we deploy a Shannon information framework, converting into diversity analogue, which provides a common currency analysis for maternally inherited haploid and bi-parentally inherited diploid nuclear markers, and then extend...

Data from: Genome-wide SNPs reveal fine-scale differentiation among wingless alpine stonefly populations, and introgression between winged and wingless forms

Nicolas Dussex, Aaron Chuah & Jonathan M. Waters
Insect flight-loss is a repeated phenomenon in alpine habitats, where wing reduction is thought to enhance local recruitment and increase fecundity. One predicted consequence of flight loss is reduced dispersal ability, which should lead to population genetic differentiation and perhaps ultimately to speciation. Using a dataset of 15,123 SNP loci, we present comparative analyses of fine-scale population structure in co-distributed Zelandoperla stonefly species, across three parallel altitudinal transects in New Zealand's Rock and Pillar mountain...

Data from: Computational performance and statistical accuracy of *BEAST and comparisons with other methods

Huw A. Ogilvie, Joseph Heled, Dong Xie & Alexei J. Drummond
Under the multispecies coalescent model of molecular evolution, gene trees have independent evolutionary histories within a shared species tree. In comparison, supermatrix concatenation methods assume that gene trees share a single common genealogical history, thereby equating gene coalescence with species divergence. The multispecies coalescent is supported by previous studies which found that its predicted distributions fit empirical data, and that concatenation is not a consistent estimator of the species tree. *BEAST, a fully Bayesian implementation...

Data from: Why pair? Evidence of aggregative mating in a socially monogamous marine fish (Siganus doliatus, Siganidae)

Rebecca J. Fox, David R. Bellwood & Michael D. Jennions
Many species live in stable pairs, usually to breed and raise offspring together, but this cannot be assumed. Establishing whether pairing is based on mating, or an alternative cooperative advantage, can be difficult, especially where species show no obvious sexual dimorphism and where the act of reproduction itself is difficult to observe. In the tropical marine fishes known as rabbitfish (Siganidae), half of extant species live in socially monogamous, territorial pairs. It has been assumed...

Data from: The effect of sex-biased dispersal on opposite-sexed spatial genetic structure and inbreeding risk

Michaela D. J. Blyton, Sam C. Banks & Rod Peakall
Natal sex-biased dispersal has long been thought to reduce the risk of inbreeding by spatially separating opposite-sexed kin. Yet, comprehensive and quantitative evaluations of this hypothesis are lacking. In this study, we quantified the effectiveness of sex-biased dispersal as an inbreeding avoidance strategy by combining spatially explicit simulations and empirical data. We quantified the extent of kin clustering by measuring the degree of spatial autocorrelation among opposite-sexed individuals (FM structure). This allowed us to systematically...

Data from: Tackling extremes: challenges for ecological and evolutionary research on extreme climatic events

Liam D. Bailey & Martijn Van De Pol
1. Extreme climatic events (ECEs) are predicted to become more frequent as the climate changes. A rapidly increasing number of studies - though few on animals - suggest that the biological consequences of ECEs can be severe. 2. However, ecological research on the impacts of extreme climatic events (ECEs) has been limited by a lack of cohesiveness and structure. ECEs are often poorly defined and have often been confusingly equated with climatic variability, making comparison...

Data from: Assessing the alignment of sexual and natural selection using radio-mutagenized seed beetles

Daniel J. Power & Luke Holman
A major unsolved question in evolutionary biology concerns the relationship between natural and sexual selection. Sexual selection might augment natural selection, e.g. if mutations that harm female fecundity also reduce male mating success. Conversely, sexual selection might favor traits that impair naturally-selected fitness components. We induced detrimental mutations in Callosobruchus maculatus beetles using X-ray irradiation, and then experimentally measured the effect of pre-copulatory sexual selection on offspring number and survival rate. Sexual selection treatment had...

Data from: Bet hedging via multiple mating: a meta-analysis

Luke Holman
Polyandry has been hypothesized to allow females to “bet hedge” against mating only with unsuitable mates, reducing variance in offspring fitness between members of a polyandrous lineage relative to a single-mating one. Theoretically, this reduction in fitness variance could select for polyandrous genotypes even when polyandry carries a direct cost, especially in small populations. However, this hypothesis is controversial and difficult to test empirically. Here, I apply a novel simulation model to 49 published empirical...

Data from: Prolific observer bias in the life sciences: why we need blind data recording

Luke Holman, Megan L. Head, Robert Lanfear & Michael D. Jennions
Observer bias and other “experimenter effects” occur when researchers’ expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work “blind,” meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence...

Data from: Mismatch in the distribution of floral ecotypes and pollinators: insights into the evolution of sexually deceptive orchids

Ryan D. Phillips, Bjorn Bohman, Janet M. Anthony, Siegfried L. Krauss, Kingsley W. Dixon & Rod Peakall
Plants are predicted to show floral adaptation to geographic variation in the most effective pollinator, potentially leading to reproductive isolation and genetic divergence. Many sexually deceptive orchids attract just a single pollinator species, limiting opportunities to experimentally investigate pollinator switching. Here we investigate Drakaea concolor, which attracts two pollinator species. Using pollinator choice tests, we detected two morphologically similar ecotypes within D. concolor. The common ecotype only attracted Zaspilothynnus gilesi, while the rare ecotype also...

Data from: The extent and consequences of p-hacking in science

Megan L. Head, Luke Holman, Rob Lanfear, Andrew T. Kahn & Michael D. Jennions
A focus on novel, confirmatory, and statistically significant results leads to substantial bias in the scientific literature. One type of bias, known as “p-hacking,” occurs when researchers collect or select data or statistical analyses until nonsignificant results become significant. Here, we use text-mining to demonstrate that p-hacking is widespread throughout science. We then illustrate how one can test for p-hacking when performing a meta-analysis and show that, while p-hacking is probably common, its effect seems...

Data from: Genes associated with ant social behavior show distinct transcriptional and evolutionary patterns

Timothy Linksvayer, Alexander Mikheyev, Timothy A Linksvayer & Alexander S Mikheyev
MySQL database for gene expression analysisMySQL database for the transcriptional, network connectedness, molecular evolution, and GO term analysismonomorium_2014-12-08.sql.gzData tables from MySQL database for gene expression analysisseparated data tables from MySQL database as zipped .csv files for the transcriptional, network connectedness, molecular evolution, and GO term analysismonomorium tables.zipdata summary by genesummary of data listed by M. pharaonis gene in comma deliminated (.csv) format. Header line with variables: gene is the M. pharaonis gene name; SINV homolog...

Data from: Exon capture phylogenomics: efficacy across scales of divergence

Jason G. Bragg, Sally Potter, Ke Bi & Craig Moritz
The evolutionary histories of species are not measured directly, but estimated using genealogies inferred for particular loci. Individual loci can have discordant histories, but in general we expect to infer evolutionary histories more accurately as more of the genome is sampled. High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) is now providing opportunities to incorporate thousands of loci in ‘phylogenomic’ studies. Here, we used target enrichment to sequence c.3000 protein-coding exons in a group of Australian skink lizards (crown...

Data from: Causes and consequences of individual variation in the extent of post-juvenile moult in the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus (Passeriformes: Paridae)

Ross A. Crates, Ben C. Sheldon & Colin J. Garroway
Moult, comprising the growth or replacement of feathers in birds, is an energetically demanding process. As a result, in many species, the extent of the post-juvenile moult can vary substantially. However, the reasons underlying this variation remain poorly understood, and the potential life-history consequences of variation in moult extent are even less clear. In the present study, we aimed to use individual-specific data to identify factors affecting the extent of the post-juvenile moult in a...

Data from: Convergent evolution across the Australian continent: ecotype diversification drives morphological convergence in two distantly related clades of Australian frogs

M. Vidal-García & J. S. Keogh
Animals from different clades but subject to similar environments often evolve similar body shapes and physiological adaptations due to convergent evolution, but this has been rarely tested at the transcontinental level and across entire classes of animal. Australia's biome diversity, isolation and aridification history provide excellent opportunities for comparative analyses on broad-scale macroevolutionary patterns. We collected morphological and environmental data on eighty-four (98%) Australian hylid frog species and categorized them into ecotypes. Using a phylogenetic...

Data from: Queen pheromones modulate DNA methyltransferase activity in bee and ant workers

Luke Holman, Kalevi Trontti & Heikki Helanterä
DNA methylation is emerging as an important regulator of polyphenism in the social insects. Research has concentrated on differences in methylation between queens and workers, though we hypothesized that methylation is involved in mediating other flexible phenotypes, including pheromone-dependent changes in worker behaviour and physiology. Here, we find that exposure to queen pheromone affects the expression of two DNA methyltransferase genes in Apis mellifera honeybees and in two species of Lasius ants, but not in...

Data from: Performance of social network sensors during Hurricane Sandy

Yury Kryvasheyeu, Haohui Chen, Esteban Moro, Pascal Van Hentenryck & Manuel Cebrian
Information flow during catastrophic events is a critical aspect of disaster management. Modern communication platforms, in particular online social networks, provide an opportunity to study such flow and derive early-warning sensors, thus improving emergency preparedness and response. Performance of the social networks sensor method, based on topological and behavioral properties derived from the “friendship paradox”, is studied here for over 50 million Twitter messages posted before, during, and after Hurricane Sandy. We find that differences...

Data from: Exploiting the richest patch has a fitness pay-off for the migratory swift parrot

Dejan Stojanovic, Aleks Terauds, Martin J. Westgate, Matthew H. Webb, David A. Roshier & Robert Heinsohn
1. Unlike philopatric migrants, the ecology of nomadic migrants is less well understood. This life-history strategy reflects responses to spatiotemporal variation in resource availability and the need to find resource rich patches to initiate breeding. The fitness consequences of movements between regions of patchily distributed resources can provide insight into ecology of all migrants and their responses to global change. 2. We link broad-scale data on spatiotemporal fluctuation in food availability to data on settlement...

Data from: Detecting macroevolutionary self-destruction from phylogenies

Lindell Bromham, Xia Hua & Marcel Cardillo
Phylogenetic analyses have lent support to the concept of lineage selection: that biological lineages can have heritable traits that influence their capacity to persist and diversify, and thereby affect their representation in biodiversity. While many discussions have focused on “positive” lineage selection, where stably heritable properties of lineages enhance their diversification rate, there are also intriguing examples that seem to represent “negative” lineage selection, where traits reduce the likelihood that a lineage will persist or...

Data from: Lineage range estimation method reveals fine-scale endemism linked to Pleistocene stability in Australian rainforest herpetofauna

Dan F. Rosauer, Renee A. Catullo, Jeremy VanDerWal, Adnan Moussalli & Craig Moritz
Areas of suitable habitat for species and communities have arisen, shifted, and disappeared with Pleistocene climate cycles, and through this shifting landscape, current biodiversity has found paths to the present. Evolutionary refugia, areas of relative habitat stability in this shifting landscape, support persistence of lineages through time, and are thus crucial to the accumulation and maintenance of biodiversity. Areas of endemism are indicative of refugial areas where diversity has persisted, and endemism of intraspecific lineages...

Data from: Ploidy and domestication are associated with genome size variation in Palms

Bee F. Gunn, Luc Baudouin, Thierry Beulé, Pascal Ilbert, Christophe Duperray, Michael Crisp, Auguste Issali, Jean-Louis Konan & Alain Rival
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: The genome size of a species (C-value) is associated with growth, development and adaptation to environmental changes. Angiosperm C-values range 1200-fold and frequently vary within species, although little is known about the impacts of domestication on genome size. Genome size variation among related species of palms is of evolutionary significance because changes characterize clades and may be associated with polyploidy, transposon amplifications, deletions, or rearrangements. Further knowledge of genome size will...

Data from: Susceptibility of amphibians to chytridiomycosis is associated with MHC class II conformation

Arnaud Bataille, Scott D. Cashins, Laura Grogan, Lee F. Skerratt, David Hunter, Michael McFaddan, Benjamin Scheele, Laura A. Brannelly, Amy Macris, Peter S. Harlow, Sara Bell, Lee Berger & Bruce Waldman
The pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can cause precipitous population declines in its amphibian hosts. Responses of individuals to infection vary greatly with the capacity of their immune system to respond to the pathogen. We used a combination of comparative and experimental approaches to identify major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) alleles encoding molecules that foster the survival of Bd-infected amphibians. We found that Bd-resistant amphibians across four continents share common amino acids in...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    44

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    44

Affiliations

  • Australian National University
    44
  • James Cook University
    4
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • Macquarie University
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • University of Exeter
    2
  • University of Helsinki
    2
  • University of Canberra
    2
  • NSW Office of Environment & Heritage
    1
  • Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self Organization
    1