43 Works

Data from: Social selection parapatry in Afrotropical sunbirds

Jay P. McEntee, Joshua V. Peñalba, Chacha Werema, Elia Mulungu, Maneno Mbilinyi, David Moyer, Louis Hansen, Jon Fjeldså & Rauri C. K. Bowie
The extent of range overlap of incipient and recent species depends on the type and magnitude of phenotypic divergence that separates them, and the consequences of phenotypic divergence on their interactions. Signal divergence by social selection likely initiates many speciation events, but may yield niche-conserved lineages predisposed to limit each others’ ranges via ecological competition. Here we examine this neglected aspect of social selection speciation theory in relation to the discovery of a non-ecotonal species...

Data from: Experimental evidence for sexual selection against inbred males

Regina Vega-Trejo, Megan L. Head, J. Scott Keogh & Michael D. Jennions
The detrimental effects of matings between relatives are well known. However, few studies determine the extent to which inbreeding depression in males is due to natural or sexual selection. Importantly, measuring fitness or key fitness components, rather than phenotypic traits allows more accurate estimation of inbreeding depression. We investigate how differences in inbreeding and juvenile diet (i.e. early stressful environment) influence a key component of male fitness, namely their reproductive success. We experimentally created inbred...

Data from: Testosterone production ability predicts breeding success and tracks breeding stage in male finches

Kristal E. Cain & Sarah R. Pryke
Testosterone (T) is an important mediator of reproductive behaviours and potential target for selection. However, there are few data relating natural variation in T to fitness estimates. Here, we used the GnRH challenge (an injection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone which stimulates maximal T release), to examine how individual differences in T relate to reproductive success and how T changes across date and breeding stage. We measured pre- and post-challenge T, in captive male Gouldian finches (Erythrura...

Data from: Thermal constraints on microhabitat selection and mating opportunities

Pablo Munguia, Patricia R. Y. Backwell, M. Zachary Darnell & Patricia R.Y. Backwell
Hot tropical environments constrain ectotherm mating opportunities when mate selection occurs on the surface. Thus, microhabitats and refugia can become a qualitative trait in mate selection. In fiddler crabs, the enlarged claw of males can act as a heat sink, which becomes advantageous when surface temperatures reach 50 °C during the day and crabs are actively seeking to mate. Uca mjoebergi females prefer male burrows found in the shade; therefore, we investigated the thermal constraints...

Data from: Inbreeding depression does not increase after exposure to a stressful environment: a test using compensatory growth

Regina Vega-Trejo, Megan L. Head & Michael D. Jennions
Background: Inbreeding is often associated with a decrease in offspring fitness (‘inbreeding depression’). Moreover, it is generally assumed that the negative effects of inbreeding are exacerbated in stressful environments. This G × E interaction has been explored in many taxa under different environmental conditions. These studies usually manipulate environmental conditions either in adulthood or throughout an individual’s entire life. Far fewer studies have tested how stressful environments only experienced during development subsequently influence the effects...

Data from: Optimal taxonomic groups for biodiversity assessment: a meta-analytic approach

Martin J. Westgate, Ayesha I. T. Tulloch, Philip S. Barton, Jennifer C. Pierson & David B. Lindenmayer
A fundamental decision in biodiversity assessment is the selection of one or more study taxa, a choice that is often made using qualitative criteria such as historical precedent, ease of detection, or available technical or taxonomic expertise. A more robust approach would involve selecting taxa based on the a priori expectation that they will provide the best possible information on unmeasured groups, but data to inform such hypotheses are often lacking. Using a global meta-analysis,...

Data from: Environmental change mediates mate choice for an extended phenotype, but not for mate quality

Megan L. Head, Rebecca J. Fox & Iain Barber
Sexual cues, including extended phenotypes, are expected to be reliable indicators of male genetic quality and/or provide information on parental quality. However, the reliability of these cues may be dependent on stability of the environment, with heterogeneity affecting how selection acts on such traits. Here we test how environmental change mediates mate choice for multiple sexual traits, including an extended phenotype – the structure of male-built nests – in stickleback fish. First, we manipulated the...

Data from: Identification and qualification of 500 nuclear, single-copy, orthologous genes for the Eupulmonata (Gastropoda) using transcriptome sequencing and exon capture

Luisa C. Teasdale, Frank Köhler, Kevin D. Murray, Tim O'Hara & Adnan Moussalli
The qualification of orthology is a significant challenge when developing large, multiloci phylogenetic data sets from assembled transcripts. Transcriptome assemblies have various attributes, such as fragmentation, frameshifts and mis-indexing, which pose problems to automated methods of orthology assessment. Here, we identify a set of orthologous single-copy genes from transcriptome assemblies for the land snails and slugs (Eupulmonata) using a thorough approach to orthology determination involving manual alignment curation, gene tree assessment and sequencing from genomic...

Data from: Inferring node dates from tip dates in fossil Canidae: the importance of tree priors

Nicholas J. Matzke & April Wright
Tip-dating methods are becoming popular alternatives to traditional node calibration approaches for building time-scaled phylogenetic trees, but questions remain about their application to empirical datasets. We compared the performance of the most popular methods against a dated tree of fossil Canidae derived from previously published monographs. Using a canid morphology dataset, we performed tip-dating using BEAST v. 2.1.3 and MrBayes v. 3.2.5. We find that for key nodes (Canis, approx. 3.2 Ma, Caninae approx. 11.7...

Data from: Trends in the sand: directional evolution in the shell shape of recessing scallops (Bivalvia: Pectinidae)

Emma Sherratt, Alvin Alejandrino, Andrew C. Kraemer, Jeanne M. Serb & Dean C. Adams
Directional evolution is one of the most compelling evolutionary patterns observed in macroevolution. Yet, despite its importance, detecting such trends in multivariate data remains a challenge. In this study, we evaluate multivariate evolution of shell shape in 93 bivalved scallop species, combining geometric morphometrics and phylogenetic comparative methods. Phylomorphospace visualization described the history of morphological diversification in the group; revealing that taxa with a recessing life habit were the most distinctive in shell shape, and...

Data from: Population scale mapping of transposable element diversity reveals links to gene regulation and epigenomic variation

Tim Stuart, Steven Eichten, Jonathan Cahn, Yuliya Karpievitch, Justin Borevitz, Ryan Lister, Steven R Eichten, Justin O Borevitz & Yuliya V Karpievitch
Variation in the presence or absence of transposable elements (TEs) is a major source of genetic variation between individuals. Here, we identified 23,095 TE presence/absence variants between 216 Arabidopsis accessions. Most TE variants were rare, and we find these rare variants associated with local extremes of gene expression and DNA methylation levels within the population. Of the common alleles identified, two thirds were not in linkage disequilibrium with nearby SNPs, implicating these variants as a...

Data from: Dynamic species co-occurrence networks require dynamic biodiversity surrogates

Ayesha I. T. Tulloch, Iadine Chadès, Yann Dujardin, Martin J. Westgate, Peter W. Lane & David Lindenmayer
In conservation it is inevitable that surrogates be selected to represent the occurrence of hard–to–find species and find priority locations for management. However, species co–occurrence can vary over time. Here we demonstrate how temporal dynamics in species co–occurrence influence the ability of managers to choose the best surrogate species. We develop an efficient optimisation formulation that selects the optimal set of complementary surrogate species from any co–occurrence network. We apply it to two Australian datasets...

Data from: Phylogenomics at the tips: inferring lineages and their demographic history in a tropical lizard, Carlia amax

Sally Potter, Jason G. Bragg, Benjamin M. Peter, Ke Bi & Craig Moritz
High-throughput sequencing approaches offer opportunities to better understand the evolutionary processes driving diversification, particularly in nonmodel organisms. In particular, the 100–1000's of loci that can now be sequenced are providing unprecedented power in population, speciation and phylogenetic studies. Here, we apply an exon capture approach to generate >99% complete sequence and SNP data across >2000 loci from a tropical skink, Carlia amax, and exploit these data to identify divergent lineages and infer their relationships and...

Data from: Population and phylogenomic decomposition via genotyping-by-sequencing in Australian Pelargonium

Adrienne B. Nicotra, Caroline Chong, Jason G. Bragg, Chong Ren Ong, Nicola C. Aitken, Aaron Chuah, Brendan Lepschi & Justin O. Borevitz
Species delimitation has seen a paradigm shift as increasing accessibility of genomic-scale data enables separation of lineages with convergent morphological traits and the merging of recently diverged ecotypes that have distinguishing characteristics. We inferred the process of lineage formation among Australian species in the widespread and highly variable genus Pelargonium by combining phylogenomic and population genomic analyses along with breeding system studies and character analysis. Phylogenomic analysis and population genetic clustering supported seven of the...

Data from: Global ecological success of Thalassoma fishes in extreme coral reef habitats

Christopher J. Fulton, Peter C. Wainwright, Andrew S. Hoey & David R. Bellwood
Phenotypic adaptations can allow organisms to relax abiotic selection and facilitate their ecological success in challenging habitats, yet we have relatively little data for the prevalence of this phenomenon at macroecological scales. Using data on the relative abundance of coral reef wrasses and parrotfishes (f. Labridae) spread across three ocean basins and the Red Sea, we reveal the consistent global dominance of extreme wave-swept habitats by fishes in the genus Thalassoma, with abundances up to...

Data from: Are sexually selected traits affected by a poor environment early in life?

Regina Vega-Trejo, Michael D. Jennions & Megan L. Head
Background: Challenging conditions experienced early in life, such as a restricted diet, can detrimentally affect key life-history traits. Individuals can reduce these costs by delaying their sexual maturation, albeit at the price of the later onset of breeding, to eventually reach the same adult size as individuals that grow up in a benevolent environment. Delayed maturation can, however, still lead to other detrimental morphological and physiological changes that become apparent later in adulthood (e.g. shorter...

Data from: Topology, divergence dates, and macroevolutionary inferences vary between different tip-dating approaches applied to fossil theropods (Dinosauria)

David W. Bapst, April M. Wright, Nick J. Matzke & Graeme T. Lloyd
Dated phylogenies of fossil taxa allow palaeobiologists to estimate the timing of major divergences and placement of extinct lineages, and to test macroevolutionary hypotheses. Recently developed Bayesian ‘tip-dating’ methods simultaneously infer and date the branching relationships among fossil taxa, and infer putative ancestral relationships. Using a previously published dataset for extinct theropod dinosaurs, we contrast the dated relationships inferred by several tip-dating approaches and evaluate potential downstream effects on phylogenetic comparative methods. We also compare...

Data from: Parental thermal environment alters offspring sex ratio and fitness in an oviparous lizard

Lisa E. Schwanz
The environment experienced by parents can impact the phenotype of their offspring (parental effects), a critical component of organismal ecology and evolution in variable or changing environments. Although temperature is a central feature of the environment for ectotherms, its role in parental effects has been little explored until recently. Here, parental basking opportunity was manipulated in an oviparous lizard with temperature-dependent sex determination, the jacky dragon (Amphibolurus muricatus). Eggs were incubated at a temperature that...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    43

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    43

Affiliations

  • Australian National University
    43
  • University of Zurich
    4
  • University of Exeter
    3
  • James Cook University
    3
  • Iowa State University
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of California System
    2
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2