56 Works

Data from: The unexpected genetic mating system of the red‐backed toadlet (Pseudophryne coriacea): a species with prolonged terrestrial breeding and cryptic reproductive behaviour

Daniel M. O'Brien, J. Scott Keogh, Aimee J. Silla & Phillip G. Byrne
Molecular technologies have revolutionised our classification of animal-mating systems, yet we still know very little about the genetic-mating systems of many vertebrate groups. It is widely believed that anuran amphibians have the highest reproductive diversity of all vertebrates, yet genetic mating systems have been studied in less than one percent of all described species. Here, we use SNPs to quantify the genetic-mating system of the terrestrial breeding red-backed toadlet Pseudophryne coriacea. In this species, breeding...

Data from: Guidelines and considerations for designing field experiments simulating precipitation extremes in forest ecosystems

Heidi Asbjornsen, John L. Campbell, Katie A. Jennings, Matthew A. Vadeboncoeur, Cameron McIntire, Pamela H. Templer, Richard P. Phillips, Taryn L. Bauerle, Michael C. Dietze, Serita D. Frey, Peter M. Groffman, Rosella Guerrieri, Paul J. Hanson, Eric P. Kelsey, Alan K. Knapp, Nathan G. McDowell, Patrick Meir, Kimberly A. Novick, Scott V. Ollinger, Will T. Pockman, Paul G. Schaberg, Stan D. Wullschleger, Melinda D. Smith & Lindsey E. Rustad
1. Context. Precipitation regimes are changing in response to climate change, yet understanding of how forest ecosystems respond to extreme droughts and pluvials remains incomplete. As future precipitation extremes will likely fall outside the range of historical variability, precipitation manipulation experiments (PMEs) are critical to advancing knowledge about potential ecosystem responses. However, few PMEs have been conducted in forests compared to short-statured ecosystems, and forest PMEs have unique design requirements and constraints. Moreover, past forest...

Data from: How to quantify (the response to) sexual selection on traits

Jonathan M. Henshaw, Michael D. Jennions & Loeske E. B. Kruuk
Natural selection operates via fitness components like mating success, fecundity and longevity, which can be understood as intermediaries in the causal process linking traits to fitness. Sexual selection occurs when traits influence mating or fertilisation success, which, in turn, influences fitness. We show how to quantify both these steps in a single path analysis, leading to better estimates of the strength of sexual selection. Our model controls for confounding variables, such as body size or...

Data from: A comprehensive and user-friendly framework for 3D-data visualisation in invertebrates and other organisms

Thomas L. Semple, Rod Peakall & Nikolai J. Tatarnic
Methods for 3D‐imaging of biological samples are experiencing unprecedented development, with tools such as X‐ray micro‐computed tomography (μCT) becoming more accessible to biologists. These techniques are inherently suited to small subjects and can simultaneously image both external and internal morphology, thus offering considerable benefits for invertebrate research. However, methods for visualising 3D‐data are trailing behind the development of tools for generating such data. Our aim in this article is to make the processing, visualisation and...

Data from: Logging and fire regimes alter plant communities

Elle J. Bowd, David B. Lindenmayer, Sam C. Banks & David P. Blair
Disturbances are key drivers of plant community composition, structure and function. Plant functional traits, including life forms and reproductive strategies are critical to the resilience and resistance of plant communities in the event of disturbance. Climate change and increasing anthropogenic disturbance are altering natural disturbance regimes, globally. When these regimes shift beyond the adaptive resilience of plant functional traits, local populations and ecosystem functions can become compromised. We tested the influence of multiple disturbances, of...

Data from: Matching symbiotic associations of an endangered orchid to habitat to improve conservation outcomes

Noushka Reiter, Ann C. Lawrie & Celeste C. Linde
Background and Aims: An understanding of mycorrhizal variation, orchid seed germination temperature and the effect of co-occurring plant species could be critical for optimising conservation translocation of endangered plants with specialised mycorrhizal associations. Methods: Focussing on the orchid Thelymitra epipactoides we isolated mycorrhizal fungi from ten plants within each of three sites; Shallow Sands Woodland (SSW), Damp Heathland (DH) and Coastal Heathland Scrub (CHS). Twenty-seven fungal isolates were tested for symbiotic germination under three temperature...

Data from: More partners, more ranges: generalist legumes spread more easily around the globe

Tia L. Harrison, Anna K. Simonsen, John R. Stinchcombe & Megan E. Frederickson
How does mutualism affect range expansion? On one hand, mutualists might thrive in new habitats thanks to the resources, stress tolerance, or defense provided by their partners. On the other, specialized mutualists might fail to find compatible partners beyond their range margins, limiting further spread. A recent global analysis of legume ranges found that non-symbiotic legumes have been successfully introduced to more ranges than legumes that form symbioses with rhizobia, but there is still abundant...

Data from: Diversification across biomes in a continental lizard radiation

Lauren G. Ashman, Jason G. Bragg, Paul Doughty, Mark Norman Hutchinson, Sarah Bank, Nick Matzke, Paul M. Oliver, Craig Moritz, N. J. Matzke & P. Oliver
Ecological opportunity is a powerful driver of evolutionary diversification, and predicts rapid lineage and phenotypic diversification following colonisation of competitor-free habitats. Alternatively, topographic or environmental heterogeneity could be key to generating and sustaining diversity. We explore these hypotheses in a widespread lineage of Australian lizards: the Gehyra variegata group. This clade occurs across two biomes: the Australian monsoonal tropics (AMT), where it overlaps a separate, larger bodied clade of Gehyra and is largely restricted to...

Data from: Transgenerational effects of maternal sexual interactions in seed beetles

Susanne R.K. Zajitschek, Damian K. Dowling, Megan L. Head, Eduardo Rodriguez-Exposito & Francisco Garcia-Gonzalez
Mating bears large costs to females, especially in species with high levels of sexual conflict over mating rates. Given the direct costs to females associated with multiple mating, which include reductions in lifespan and lifetime reproductive success, past research focused on identifying potential indirect benefits (through increases in offspring fitness) that females may accrue. Far less attention has been given to understanding how costs of sexual interactions to females may span across generations. Hence, little...

Data from: Electroreception in early vertebrates: survey, evidence and new information

Benedict King, Yuzhi Hu & John A. Long
Electroreception is widespread in living vertebrates, and is often considered a primitive vertebrate character. However, the early evolution of electroreception remains unclear. A variety of structures in early vertebrate fossils have been put forward as potential electroreceptors, but these need to be reassessed in light of the now substantial literature on electroreceptors in living vertebrates. Here we review the evidence for all putative electroreceptors in early vertebrates, and provide new information from CT scans. In...

Data from: Universal target-enrichment baits for anthozoan (Cnidaria) phylogenomics: new approaches to long-standing problems

Andrea M. Quattrini, Brant C. Faircloth, Luisa F. Dueñas, Thomas C.L. Bridge, Mercer R. Brügler, Ivan F. Calixto-Botía, Danielle M. DeLeo, Sylvain Foret, Santiago Herrera, Simon M.Y. Lee, David J. Miller, Carlos Prada, Gandhi Rádis-Baptista, Catalina Ramírez-Portilla, Juan A. Sánchez, Estefania Rodriguez, Catherine S. McFadden, Tom C. L. Bridge & Simon M. Y. Lee
Anthozoans (e.g., corals, anemones) are an ecologically important and diverse group of marine metazoans that occur from shallow to deep waters worldwide. However, our understanding of the evolutionary relationships among the ~7500 species within this class is hindered by the lack of phylogenetically informative markers that can be reliably sequenced across a diversity of taxa. We designed and tested 16,308 RNA baits to capture 720 Ultraconserved Element loci and 1,071 exon loci. Library preparation and...

Data from: Enhancing the steroid sulfatase activity of the arylsulfatase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Dimanthi Roshika Uduwela, Anna Pabis, Bradley J. Stevenson, Shina C. L. Kamerlin & Malcolm D. McLeod
Steroidal sulfate esters play a central role in many physiological processes. They serve as the reservoir for endogenous sex hormones and form a significant fraction of the steroid metabolite pool. The analysis of steroid sulfates is thus essential in fields such as medical science and sports drug testing. Although the direct detection of steroid sulfates can be readily achieved using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, many analytical approaches, including gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, are hampered due to the...

Data from: An experimental evaluation of traits that influence the sexual behaviour of pollinators in sexually deceptive orchids

Ryan D. Phillips & Rod Peakall
Pollination by sexual deception of male insects is perhaps one of the most remarkable cases of mimicry in the plant kingdom. However, understanding the influence of floral traits on pollinator behaviour in sexually deceptive orchids is challenging, due to the risk of confounding changes in floral odour when manipulating morphology. Here, we investigated the floral traits influencing the sexual response of male Zaspilothynnus nigripes (Tiphiidae) wasps, a pollinator of two distantly related sexually deceptive orchids...

Data from: Pervasive admixture between eucalypt species has consequences for conservation and assisted migration

Brenton Von Takach Dukai, Cameron Jack, Justin Borevitz, David B. Lindenmayer & Sam C. Banks
Conservation management often uses information on genetic population structure to assess the importance of local provenancing for ecological restoration and reintroduction programs. For species that do not exhibit complete reproductive isolation, the estimation of population genetic parameters may be influenced by the extent of admixture. Therefore, to avoid perverse outcomes for conservation, genetically-informed management strategies must determine whether hybridisation between species is relevant, and the extent to which observed population genetic patterns are shaped by...

Data from: Larger plants promote a greater diversity of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria associated with an Australian endemic legume

Russell Dinnage, Anna K. Simonsen, Luke G. Barrett, Marcel Cardillo, Nat Raisbeck-Brown, Peter H. Thrall & Suzanne M. Prober
A major goal in microbial ecology is to understand the factors that structure bacterial communities across space and time. For microbes that are plant symbionts, community assembly processes can lead to either a positive or negative relationship between plant size or age and soil microbe diversity. Here, we evaluated the extent to which such relationships exist within a single legume species (Acacia acuminata) and their naturally occurring symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia). 2. We quantified the...

Data from: Prediction error and repetition suppression have distinct effects on neural representations of visual information

Matthew F. Tang, Cooper A. Smout, Ehsan Arabzadeh & Jason B. Mattingley
Predictive coding theories argue that recent experience establishes expectations in the brain that generate prediction errors when violated. Prediction errors provide a possible explanation for repetition suppression, where evoked neural activity is attenuated across repeated presentations of the same stimulus. The predictive coding account argues repetition suppression arises because repeated stimuli are expected, whereas non-repeated stimuli are unexpected and thus elicit larger neural responses. Here we employed electroencephalography in humans to test the predictive coding...

Data from: Current geography masks dynamic history of gene flow during speciation in northern Australian birds

Joshua V. Peñalba, Leo Joseph & Craig Moritz
Genome divergence is greatly influenced by gene flow during early stages of speciation. As populations differentiate, geographical barriers can constrain gene flow and so affect the dynamics of divergence and speciation. Current geography, specifically disjunction and continuity of ranges, is often used to predict the historical gene flow during the divergence process. We test this prediction in eight meliphagoid bird species complexes codistributed in four regions. These regions are separated by known biogeographic barriers across...

Data from: Capture enrichment of aquatic environmental DNA: a first proof of concept

Taylor M. Wilcox, Katherine E. Zarn, Maxine P. Piggott, Michael K. Young, Kevin S. McKelvey & Michael K. Schwartz
Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling – the detection of genetic material in the environment to infer species presence – has rapidly grown as a tool for sampling aquatic animal communities. A potentially powerful feature of environmental sampling is that all taxa within the habitat shed DNA and so may be detectable, creating opportunity for whole-community assessments. However, animal DNA in the environment tends to be comparatively rare, making it necessary to enrich for genetic targets from...

Data from: Spatial, temporal and individual-based differences in nest-site visits and subsequent reproductive success in wild great tits

Joshua A. Firth, Brecht L. Verhelst, Ross A. Crates, Colin J. Garroway, Ben C. Sheldon & Josh A. Firth
The behaviour of individual birds before and during the breeding period may be an important factor determining reproductive success. One commonly observed behaviour during the breeding period in many species is the visitation of multiple potential breeding sites. Much research has attempted to determine the function and consequences of this behaviour, but traditionally studies have been limited to not examining individual-level behaviour, or only considering a small number of individuals. We used automated recording of...

Data from: Experimental habitat fragmentation disrupts nematode infections in Australian skinks

Julian Resasco, Matthew E. Bitters, Saul A. Cunningham, Hugh I. Jones, Valerie J. McKenzie & Kendi F. Davies
Habitat conversion and fragmentation threaten biodiversity and disrupt species interactions. While parasites are recognized as ecologically important, the impacts of fragmentation on parasitism are poorly understood relative to other species interactions. This lack of understanding is in part due to confounding landscape factors that accompany fragmentation. Fragmentation experiments provide the opportunity to fill this knowledge gap by mechanistically testing how fragmentation affects parasitism while controlling landscape factors. In a large-scale, long-term experiment, we asked how...

Data from: Landscape-specific thresholds in the relationship between species richness and natural land cover

Jeremy S. Simmonds, Berndt J. Van Rensburg, Ayesha I. T. Tulloch & Martine Maron
1. Thresholds in the relationship between species richness and natural land cover can inform landscape-level vegetation protection and restoration targets. However, landscapes differ considerably in composition and other environmental attributes. If the effect of natural land cover on species richness depends on (i.e. interacts with) these attributes, and this affects the value of thresholds in this relationship, such dependencies must be considered when using thresholds to guide landscape management. 2. We hypothesised that the amount...

Data from: Variation in the condition-dependence of individual sexual traits in male eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki

Rebecca J. Fox, Ellen E. Gearing, Michael D. Jennions & Megan L. Head
Most sexually-selected traits are costly to produce and therefore tend to show condition-dependent expression. But individuals have a finite set of resources to invest across the multiple traits on which sexual selection acts. This necessarily leads to trade-offs among individual traits and between different reproductive stages. The effect of male condition on trait expression might therefore vary for different sexually selected traits depending on the marginal gains from investment into one trait rather than another....

Data from: How mountains shape biodiversity: the role of the Andes in biogeography, diversification, and reproductive biology in South America's most species‐rich lizard radiation (Squamata: Liolaemidae)

Damien Esquerre, Ian G. Brennan, Renee A. Catullo, Fernando Torres-Perez, J.Scott Keogh & J. Scott Keogh
Testing hypotheses on the drivers of clade evolution and trait diversification provides insight into many aspects of evolutionary biology. Often, studies investigate only the intrinsic biological properties of organisms as the causes of diversity, however extrinsic properties of a clade’s environment, particularly geological history, may also offer compelling explanations. The Andes are a young mountain chain known to have shaped many aspects of climate and diversity of South America. The Liolaemidae are a radiation of...

Data from: Reconstructing the geography of speciation from contemporary biodiversity data

Alexander Skeels & Marcel Cardillo
Inferring the geographic mode of speciation could help reveal the evolutionary and ecological mechanisms that underlie the generation of biodiversity. Comparative methods have sought to reconstruct the geographic speciation history of clades using data on phylogeny and species’ geographic ranges. However, inference from comparative methods has been limited by uncertainty over whether contemporary biodiversity data retain the historic signal of speciation. We constructed a process-based simulation model to determine the influence of speciation mode and...

Data from: C4 savanna grasses fail to maintain assimilation in drying soil under low CO2 compared with C3 trees despite lower leaf water demand

Joe Quirk, Chandra Bellasio, David A. Johnson, Colin P. Osborne & David J. Beerling
1) C4 photosynthesis evolved when grasses migrated out of contracting forests under a declining atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]a) and drying climate around 30 million years ago. C4 grasses are hypothesised to benefit from improved plant–water relations in open habitats like savannas, giving advantages over C3 plants under low [CO2]a. But experimental evidence in a low CO2 environment is limited and comparisons with C3 trees are needed to understand savanna vegetation patterns. 2) To test whether...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    56

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    56

Affiliations

  • Australian National University
    56
  • Flinders University
    5
  • University of Oxford
    4
  • University of Edinburgh
    3
  • Australian Museum
    3
  • Queensland Museum
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    2
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • La Trobe University
    2