36 Works

Data from: A replicated climate change field experiment reveals rapid evolutionary response in an ecologically important soil invertebrate

Thomas Bataillon, Nicolas Galtier, Aurelien Bernard, Nicolai Cryer, Nicolas Faivre, Sylvain Santoni, Dany Severac, Theis N. Mikkelsen, Klaus S. Larsen, Claus Beier, Jesper G. Sørensen, Martin Holmstrup, Bodil Ehlers, Bodil K. Ehlers & Teis N. Mikkelsen
Whether species can respond evolutionarily to current climate change is crucial for the persistence of many species. Yet, very few studies have examined genetic responses to climate change in manipulated experiments carried out in natural field conditions. We examined the evolutionary response to climate change in a common annelid worm using a controlled replicated experiment where climatic conditions were manipulated in a natural setting. Analyzing the transcribed genome of 15 local populations, we found that...

Data from: Competitor relatedness, indirect soil effects and plant co-existence

Bodil K. Ehlers, Patrice David, Christian F. Damgaard & Thomas Lenormand
How species co-exist is a central question in ecology. Niche differentiation can prevent two species from excluding each other by competition. However, this interaction can vary in space because of internal factors such as intraspecific genetic variation, or external ones such as the presence of a third species. While these effects have been repeatedly observed, their joint effect on the outcome of competition has rarely been considered. We experimentally investigated how a dominant ecosystem engineer...

Data from: The shield effect: nuptial gifts protect males against precopulatory sexual cannibalism

Søren Toft & Maria Jose Albo
Several not mutually exclusive functions have been ascribed to nuptial gifts across different taxa. Although the idea that a nuptial prey gift may protect the male from pre-copulatory sexual cannibalism is attractive, it has previously been considered of no importance based on indirect evidence and rejected by experimental tests. We reinvestigated whether nuptial gifts may function as a shield against female attacks during mating encounters in the spider Pisaura mirabilis and whether female hunger influences...

Data from: Cultural turnover among Galápagos sperm whales

Mauricio Cantor, Hal Whitehead, Shane Gero & Luke Rendell
While populations may wax and wane, it is rare for an entire population to be replaced by a completely different set of individuals. We document the large-scale relocation of cultural groups of sperm whale off the Galápagos Islands, in which two sympatric vocal clans were entirely replaced by two different ones. Between 1985 and 1999, whales from two clans (called Regular and Plus-One) defined by cultural dialects in coda vocalizations were repeatedly photo-identified off Galápagos....

Data from: PSMC (pairwise sequentially Markovian coalescent) analysis of RAD (restriction site associated DNA) sequencing data

Shenglin Liu & Michael M. Hansen
The pairwise sequentially Markovian coalescent (PSMC) method uses the genome sequence of a single individual to estimate demographic history covering a time span of thousands of generations. Although originally designed for whole-genome data, we here use simulations to investigate its applicability to reference genome-aligned restriction site associated DNA (RAD) data. We find that RAD data can potentially be used for PSMC analysis, but at present with limitations. The key factor is the proportion (p) of...

Data from: Effects of food abundance and early clutch predation on reproductive timing in a high Arctic shorebird exposed to advancements in arthropod abundance

Jeroen Reneerkens, Niels Martin Schmidt, Olivier Gilg, Jannik Hansen, Lars Holst Hansen, Jérôme Moreau & Theunis Piersma
Climate change may influence the phenology of organisms unequally across trophic levels and thus lead to phenological mismatches between predators and prey. In cases where prey availability peaks before reproducing predators reach maximal prey demand, any negative fitness consequences would selectively favor resynchronization by earlier starts of the reproductive activities of the predators. At a study site in northeast Greenland, over a period of 17 years, the median emergence of the invertebrate prey of Sanderling...

Data from: Environment not dispersal limitation drives clonal composition of arctic Daphnia in a recently deglaciated area

Tsegazeabe Hadush Haileselasie, Joachim Mergeay, Lawrence J. Weider, Ruben Sommaruga, Thomas A. Davidson, Mariana Meerhoff, Hartmut Arndt, Klaus Jürgens, Erik Jeppesen & Luc De Meester
One of the most prominent manifestations of the ongoing climate warming is the retreat of glaciers and ice sheets around the world. Retreating glaciers result in the formation of new ponds and lakes, which are available for colonization. The gradual appearance of these new habitat patches allows us to determine to what extent the composition of asexual Daphnia (water flea) populations is affected by environmental drivers versus dispersal limitation. Here we used a landscape genetics...

Data from: Linear reaction norms of thermal limits in Drosophila: predictable plasticity in cold but not in heat tolerance

Mads Fristrup Schou, Marie Brandt Mouridsen, Jesper Givskov Sørensen & Volker Loeschcke
1. Thermal limits of ectotherms have been studied extensively and are believed to be evolutionary constrained, leaving ectotherms at risk under future climate change. Phenotypic plasticity may extend the thermal limits, but we lack detailed characterizations of thermal limit reaction norms as well as an understanding of the interspecific variation of these reaction norms. 2. Here we investigated the interspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity of thermal limits in 13 Drosophila species. We obtained high-resolution reaction...

Data from: Global transcriptome changes in perennial ryegrass during early infection by pink snow mould

Mallikarjuna Rao Kovi, Mohamed Abdelhalim, Anil Kunapareddy, Åshild Ergon, Anne Marte Tronsmo, May Bente Brurberg, Ingerd Skow Hofgaard, Torben Asp & Odd Arne Rognli
Lack of resistance to pink snow mould (Microdochium nivale) is a major constraint for adaptation of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) to continental regions with long-lasting snow cover at higher latitudes. Almost all investigations of genetic variation in resistance have been performed using cold acclimated plants. However, there may be variation in resistance mechanisms that are functioning independently of cold acclimation. In this study our aim was to identify candidate genes involved in such resistance...

Data from: Sex-specific, inverted rhythms of breeding-site attendance in an Arctic seabird

Nicholas Per Huffeldt & Flemming R. Merkel
In contrast to daily rhythms that are common in the presence of the geophysical light–dark cycle, organisms at polar latitudes exhibit many diel activity patterns during natural periods of continuous solar light or darkness (polar day and night, respectively), from 24 h rhythms to arrhythmicity. In Arctic Greenland (73.7° N, 56.6° W) during polar day, we observed breeding-site attendance rhythms of thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia; n = 21 pairs), a charadriiform seabird, which provide biparental...

Data from: Region-wide and ecotype-specific differences in demographic histories of threespine stickleback populations, estimated from whole genome sequences

Shenglin Liu, Michael M. Hansen & Magnus W. Jacobsen
We analysed 81 whole genome sequences of threespine sticklebacks from Pacific North America, Greenland and Northern Europe, representing 16 populations. Principal component analysis of nuclear SNPs grouped populations according to geographical location, with Pacific populations being more divergent from each other relative to European and Greenlandic populations. Analysis of mitogenome sequences showed Northern European populations to represent a single phylogeographical lineage, whereas Greenlandic and particularly Pacific populations showed admixture between lineages. We estimated demographic history...

Data from: Good reasons to leave home: proximate dispersal cues in a social spider

Reut Berger-Tal, Na'ama Berner Aharon, Shlomi Aharon, Cristina Tuni & Yael Lubin
Natal dispersal is a successful tactic under a range of conditions in spite of significant costs. Habitat quality is a frequent proximate cause of dispersal, and studies have shown that dispersal increases both when natal habitat quality is good or poor. In social species kin competition, favoring dispersal, may be balanced by the benefits of group living, favoring philopatry. We investigated the effect of changes in the local environment on natal dispersal of adult females...

Data from: One fly to rule them all—muscid flies are the key pollinators in the Arctic

Mikko Tiusanen, Paul D.N. Hebert, Niels-Martin Schmidt, Tomas Roslin & Niels Martin Schmidt
Global change is causing drastic changes in the pollinator communities of the Arctic. While arctic flowers are visited by a wide range of insects, flies in family Muscidae have been proposed as a pollinator group of particular importance. To understand the functional outcome of current changes in pollinator community composition, we examined the role of muscids in the pollination of a key plant species, the mountain avens (Dryas). We monitored the seed set of Dryas...

Data from: A new paradigm for biomonitoring: an example building on the Danish Stream Plant Index

Annette Baattrup-Pedersen, Emma Göthe, Tenna Riis, Dagmar K. Andersen & Søren E. Larsen
Despite intensive efforts for more than a decade to develop Water Framework-compliant assessment systems, shortcomings continue to appear. In particular, the lack of reference conditions has hindered the development of assessment systems capturing the heart of the Water Framework Directive (WFD) – that ecological status should be set as the deviation from the natural, undisturbed condition. Recently, the Danish Stream Plant Index (DSPI) was developed. This system contrasts existing systems in that it builds on...

Data from: The association between exposure to environmental bisphenol A and gonadotropic hormone levels among men

Hong Liang, Wenping Xu, Jianping Chen, Huijuan Shi, Jiang Zhu, Xiaoqin Liu, Jian Wang, Maohua Miao & Wei Yuan
Bisphenol A (BPA) is an extensively used chemical with endocrine disrupting properties. Although animal and in vivo studies have suggested possible effects of BPA on levels of gonadotropic hormones, human studies are limited and inconclusive. The study examined whether environmental BPA exposure was associated with gonadotropic hormones levels in men. A total of 560 men aged 18–55 years were recruited from Sandu County, Guizhou Province, China. We collected urine samples for measurement of BPA, and...

Data from: Interspecific interactions and learning variability jointly drive geographic differences in mate preferences

Machteld N. Verzijden & Erik I. Svensson
Co-occurrence of closely related species can cause behavioral interference in mating and increase hybridization risk. Theoretically, this could lead to the evolution of more species-specific mate preferences and sexual signaling traits. Alternatively, females can learn to reject heterospecific males, to avoid male sexual interference from closely related species. Such learned mate discrimination could also affect conspecific mate preferences if females generalize from between species differences to prefer more species-specific mating signals. Female damselflies of the...

Data from: The reciprocal relationship between competition and intraspecific trait variation

Jonathan A. Bennett, Kersti Riibak, Riin Tamme, Rob J. Lewis & Meelis Pärtel
Trait differences among plants are expected to influence the outcome of competition; competition should be strongest between similar species (or individuals) under limiting similarity, and between dissimilar species within competitive hierarchies. These hypotheses are often used to infer competitive dynamics from trait patterns within communities. However, plant traits are frequently plastic in response to competition. This variation is poorly accounted for in trait-based studies of competition and community assembly. To explore the relationship between trait...

Data from: Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature

Jesper Givskov Sørensen, Mads Fristrup Schou, Torsten Nygaard Kristensen & Volker Loeschcke
Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally...

Data from: Data for evaluation of fast kurtosis imaging, b-value optimization and exploration of diffusion MRI contrast

Brian Hansen & Sune Nørhøj Jespersen
Here we describe and provide diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data that was acquired in neural tissue and a physical phantom. Data acquired in biological tissue includes: fixed rat brain (acquired at 9.4T) and spinal cord (acquired at 16.4T) and in normal human brain (acquired at 3T). This data was recently used for evaluation of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) contrasts and for comparison to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameter contrast. The data has also been...

Data from: Historical DNA documents long distance natal homing in marine fish

Sara Bonanomi, Nina Overgaard Therkildsen, Anja Retzel, Rasmus Berg Hedeholm, Martin Wæver Wæver Pedersen, Dorte Meldrup, Christophe Pampoulie, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen, Peter Grønkjær & Einar Nielsen
The occurrence of natal homing in marine fish remains a fundamental question in fish ecology as its unequivocal demonstration requires tracking of individuals from fertilization to reproduction. Here, we provide evidence of long distance natal homing (> 1000 km) over more than sixty years in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), through genetic analysis of archived samples from marked and recaptured individuals. Using a high differentiation Single Nucleotide Polymorphism assay we demonstrate that the vast majority of...

Data from: From tissue to silicon to plastic: three-dimensional printing in comparative anatomy and physiology

Henrik Lauridsen, Kasper Hansen, Mathias Ø. Nørgård, Tobias Wang & Michael Pedersen
Comparative anatomy and physiology are disciplines related to structures and mechanisms in three-dimensional (3D) space. For the past centuries, scientific reports in these fields have relied on written descriptions and two-dimensional (2D) illustrations, but in recent years 3D virtual modelling has entered the scene. However, comprehending complex anatomical structures is hampered by reproduction on flat inherently 2D screens. One way to circumvent this problem is in the production of 3D-printed scale models. We have applied...

Data from: What North America’s skeleton crew of megafauna tells us about community disassembly

Matt Davis
Functional trait diversity is increasingly used to model future changes in community structure despite a poor understanding of community disassembly's effects on functional diversity. By tracking the functional diversity of the North American large mammal fauna through the End-Pleistocene megafaunal extinction and up to the present, I show that contrary to expectations, functionally unique species are no more likely to go extinct than functionally redundant species. This makes total functional richness loss no worse than...

Data from: Few genetic and environmental correlations between life history and stress resistance traits affect adaptation to fluctuating thermal regimes

Tommaso Manenti, Jesper G. Sørensen, Neda N. Moghadam & Volker Loeschcke
Laboratory selection in thermal regimes that differed in the amplitude and the predictability of daily fluctuations had a marked effect on stress resistance and life history traits in Drosophila simulans. The observed evolutionary changes are expected to be the result of both direct and correlated responses to selection. Thus, a given trait might not evolve independently from other traits because of genetic correlations among these traits. Moreover, different test environments can induce novel genetic correlations...

Data from: The dominant detritus-feeding invertebrate in arctic peat soils derives its essential amino acids from gut symbionts

Thomas Larsen, Marc Ventura, Kristine Maraldo, Xavier Triadó-Margarit, Emilio O. Casamayor, Yiming V. Wang, Nils Andersen & Diane M. O'Brien
Supplementation of nutrients by symbionts enables consumers to thrive on resources that might otherwise be insufficient to meet nutritional demands. Such nutritional subsidies by intracellular symbionts has been well studied; however, supplementation of de novo synthesized nutrients to hosts by extracellular gut symbionts is poorly documented, especially for generalists with relatively undifferentiated intestinal tracts. Although gut symbionts facilitate degradation of resources that would otherwise remain inaccessible to the host, such digestive actions alone cannot make...

Data from: Use of glacial fronts by narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in West Greenland

Kristin L. Laidre, Twila Moon, Donna D.W. Hauser, Richard McGovern, Mads Peter Heide-Joergensen, Rune Dietz, Benjamin Hudson, Donna D. W. Hauser & Ben Hudson
Glacial fronts are important summer habitat for narwhals (Monodon monoceros), however, no studies have quantified which glacial properties attract whales. We investigated the importance of glacial habitats using telemetry data from n=15 whales in September 1993-1994 and 2006-2007 in Melville Bay, West Greenland. For 41 marine-terminating glaciers, we estimated 1) narwhal presence/absence, 2) number of 24 h periods spent at glaciers, and 3) the fraction of narwhals that visited each glacier (at 5, 7, and...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    36

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    36

Affiliations

  • Aarhus University
    36
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • Dalhousie University
    2
  • Grønlands Naturinstitut
    2
  • University of Tartu
    2
  • Technical University of Denmark
    2
  • Kiel University
    2
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • Rice University
    1
  • National University of Malaysia
    1