56 Works

Genome-scale target capture of mitochondrial and nuclear environmental DNA from water samples

Mads Reinholdt Jensen & Philip Francis Thomsen
Environmental DNA (eDNA) provides a promising supplement to traditional sampling methods for population genetic inferences, but current studies have almost entirely focused on short mitochondrial markers. Here, we develop one mitochondrial and one nuclear set of target capture probes for the whale shark (Rhincodon typus) and test them on seawater samples collected in Qatar to investigate the potential of target capture for eDNA-based population studies. The mitochondrial target capture successfully retrieved ~235x (90x-352x per base...

Data from: Vessel noise levels drive behavioural responses of humpback whales with implications for whale-watching

Kate Sprogis
Disturbance from whale-watching can cause significant behavioural changes with fitness consequences for targeted whale populations. However, the sensory stimuli triggering these responses are unknown, preventing effective mitigation. Here, we test the hypothesis that vessel noise level is a driver of disturbance, using humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) as a model species. We conducted controlled exposure experiments (n= 42) on resting mother-calf pairs on a resting ground off Australia, by simulating whale-watch scenarios with a research vessel...

Data from : Historical legacies and ecological determinants of grass naturalizations worldwide

Anne-Christine Monnet, Maria S. Vorontsova, Rafaël H. A. Govaerts, Jens-Christian Svenning & Brody Sandel
The global distribution of exotic species is the result of abiotic, biotic and dispersal filtering processes that shape the movement and success of species outside their native range. In this study we aim to understand how these filtering processes drive the fluxes of grass species among regions, the factors that influence which species establish outside of their native range, and where they do so. We used national and subnational checklists of native and introduced grass...

Data from: Vessel noise levels drive behavioural responses of humpback whales with implications for whale-watching

Kate Sprogis
Disturbance from whale-watching can cause significant behavioural changes with fitness consequences for targeted whale populations. However, the sensory stimuli triggering these responses are unknown, preventing effective mitigation. Here, we test the hypothesis that vessel noise level is a driver of disturbance, using humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) as a model species. We conducted controlled exposure experiments (n= 42) on resting mother-calf pairs on a resting ground off Australia, by simulating whale-watch scenarios with a research vessel...

Nutrient digestibility and balance studies

Sadjad Danesh Mesgaran, Björn Kuhla, René Baumont, Gonzalo Cantalapiedra-Hijar, Pierre Noziére, Peter Lund, David Humphries & Jan Dijkstra
The nutritional value of a feed for cattle depends on its nutrient and energy contents, the extent of rumen fermentation and degradation, and the post-ruminal digestibility. Efficiency of digestion depends on different factors, for example, the apparent digestibility (estimated by subtracting the nutrients contained in faeces from the nutrients contained in dietary intake – unlike true digestibility where the endogenous and microbial amount is taken into account and corrected in final outcome) usually decreases when...

The fate of Meconopsis species in the Tibeto-Himalayan region under future climate change

Wen-Ting Wang, Wen-Yong Guo, Scott Jarvie & Jens-Christian Svenning
High-mountain areas such as the Tibeto-Himalayan region (THR) host cold-adapted biota expected to be sensitive to anthropogenic climate change. Meconopsis is a representative endangered genus confined to alpine meadow or subnival habitats in the THR. To obtain occurrence data for Meconopsis species found in the THR and adjacent regions, we used records from the Chinese Virtual Herbarium (CVH: http://www.cvh.org.cn/), the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF: http://www.gbif.org/), and the published literature (He et al., 2019). We...

Rumen fluid sampling via oral stomach tubing method

Sanne van Gastelen, Wouter Muizelaar, Paolo Bani, Björn Kuhla, Mogens Larsen & David Yáñez-Ruiz
There are different purposes for collecting rumen fluid, e.g. assessment of rumen fermentation characteristics and rumen microbiota, as well as ex vivo incubations for feed analysis. Collecting rumen content through the fistula from rumen cannulated ruminants is considered the reference method for the collection of representative samples of rumen digesta, but access to surgically-modified animals is not universal and restricted to research facilities. Hence, a less invasive alternative has been developed: the oral stomach tubing...

Dark diversity reveals importance of biotic resources and competition for plant diversity across habitats

Camilla Fløjgaard, José Valdez, Lars Dalby, Jesper Erenskjold Moeslund, Kevin Clausen, Rasmus Ejrnæs, Meelis Partel & Ane Kirstine Brunbjerg
Species richness is the most commonly used metric to quantify biodiversity. However, examining dark diversity, the group of missing species which can potentially inhabit a site, can provide a more thorough understanding of the processes influencing observed biodiversity and help evaluate the restoration potential of local habitats. So far, dark diversity has mainly been studied for specific habitats or largescale landscapes while less attention has been given to variation across broad environmental gradients or as...

Criteria for defining interictal epileptiform discharges in EEG: a clinical validation study

Mustafa Aykut Kural, Lene Duez, Vibeke Sejer Hansen, Pål Gunnar Larsson, Stefan Rampp, Reinhard Schulz, Hatice Tankisi, Richard Wennberg, Bo Bibby, Michael Scherg & Sandor Beniczky
Objective: To define and validate criteria for accurate identification of EEG interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) using: (a) the six sensor space criteria proposed by the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology (IFCN), and, (b) a novel source space method. Criteria yielding high specificity are needed because EEG “over-reading” is a common cause of epilepsy misdiagnosis. Methods: Seven raters reviewed EEG segments containing sharp waveforms from 100 patients with and without epilepsy. Clinical diagnosis gold standard was...

Introduction to citizen science. The case of Fangstjournalen.dk

Jitka Stilund Hansen, Signe Gadegaard, Karsten Kryger Hansen, Gertrud Stougård Thomsen, Asger Væring Larsen & Katrine Flindt Holmstrand

FAIR data in a Citizen Science project “Fangstjournalen”

Katrine Flindt Holmstrand, Asger Væring Larsen, Signe Gadegaard, Jitka Stilund Hansen, Karsten Kryger Hansen & Gertrud Stougård Thomsen
In this video Researcher Christian Skov from DTU Aqua tells about the Citizen Science project “Fangstjournalen” and how Research Data Management, data sharing and following the FAIR guiding principles for research data can increase the impact and the value of the research - even beyond the scope of the project. This video is produced by four Danish Universities as part of a project financially supported by DEFF. The aim of the project is to identify...

Genotypes of Swan Geese Anser cygnoides using 17 nuclear microsatellite loci at 14 locations.

Qin Zhu, Iderbat Damaba, Qingshan Zhao, Kunpeng Yi, Nyambayar Batbayar, Tseveenmyadag Natsagdorj, Davaasuren Batmunkh, Xin Wang, Sonia Rozenfeld, Sachiko Moriguchi, Aibin Zhan, Lei Cao & Anthony David Fox
Dispersal affects the spatial distribution and population structure of species.Dispersal is often male-biased in mammals while female-biased in birds, with the notable exception of the Anatidae. In this study, we tested genetic evidence for sex-biased dispersal (SBD) in the Swan Goose Anser cygnoides, an Asian endemic and IUCN vulnerable species, which has been increasingly restricted to breeding on Mongolian steppe wetlands. We analyzed the genotypes of 278 Swan Geese samples from 14 locations at 14...

Data from: Arthropods as vertebrate predators: a review of global patterns

Jose Valdez
Aim: Arthropods as vertebrate predators is generally overlooked in ecology due to the cryptic nature of these events, the relatively small size of arthropods, and the difficulty in finding published data. This study represents the largest global assessment of arthropods preying on vertebrates to provide a conceptual framework, identify global patterns, and provide a searchable database. Location: Global. Time period: Present. Major taxa studied: Arthropods and vertebrates. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted. Results:...

Bodyweight, body condition and anatomy

Sadjad Danesh Mesgaran, Martin Weisbjerg, Alex Bach, Jennifer Salau, Jan Henning Haas, Wolfgang Junge, Georg Thaller & Björn Kuhla
Measuring bodyweight (BW) in cattle is essential for many research and management activities such as calculating dietary energy requirements for maintenance, calculating average daily gain and evaluating breeding values which include BW as a trait. Frequent monitoring of BW in dairy cows is necessary as changes in BW can help assess the energy balance of an animal. Precise understanding of BW gain of growing and fattening cattle or body mass changes during lactation is crucial...

The gas recovery test of respiratory chambers

Sadjad Danesh Mesgaran, Anne Louise Frydendahl Hellwing, Peter Lund, Michael Derno, Björn Kuhla, Marcel Heetkamp, Gemma Miller, David Humphries, Frederic Anglard, Yvanne Rochette, Cécile Martin, Tom Gardiner & Marc Coleman
Respiratory Chambers (RCs) were originally constructed with the purpose to study heat production from animals by quantifying oxygen (O2) consumption and carbon dioxide (CO2) production (initially detailed in the 18th century by Lavoisier and Leplace. Enteric methane (CH4) is measured in calorimetry studies, as CH4 is an energy loss. The RC can therefore be used to quantify the CH4 production from animals, and many new RC units have been constructed during the last decades with...

Intraspecific variation of Phragmites australis: Clinal adaption of functional traits and phenotypic plasticity vary with latitude of origin

Linjing Ren, Xiao Guo, Shuna Liu, Ting Yu, Weihua Guo, Renqing Wang, Siyuan Ye, Carla Lambertini, Hans Brix & Franziska Eller
1. Widespread plant species generally have high intraspecific variation in functional traits, which is reflected in their great variety of phenotypes. This variety can result from both genetic differences due to local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity. With high intraspecific variation and nearly global distribution, the common reed Phragmites australis is a suitable model species for studying the underlying mechanisms of intraspecific trait variation. 2. In this study, 71 genotypes of P. australis from seven phylogeographic...

Rethinking megafauna

Marcos Moleón, José Sánchez-Zapata, José Donázar, Eloy Revilla, Berta Martín-López, Cayetano Gutiérrez-Cánovas, Wayne Getz, Zebensui Morales-Reyes, Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz, Larry Crowder, Mauro Galetti, Manuela González-Suárez, Fengzhi He, Pedro Jordano, Rebecca Lewison, Robin Naidoo, Norman Owen-Smith, Nuria Selva, Jens-Christian Svenning, José Tella, Christiane Zarfl, Sonja Jähnig, Matt Hayward, Søren Faurby, Nuria García … & Klement Tochner
Concern for megafauna is increasing among scientists and non-scientists. Many studies have emphasized that megafauna play prominent ecological roles and provide important ecosystem services to humanity. But, what precisely are “megafauna”? Here we critically assess the concept of megafauna and propose a goal-oriented framework for megafaunal research. First, we review definitions of megafauna and analyze associated terminology in the scientific literature. Second, we conduct a survey among ecologists and paleontologists to assess the species traits...

Data from: Neural dysfunction correlates with heat coma and CTmax in Drosophila but does not set the boundaries for heat stress survival

Lisa B. Jørgensen, R. Meldrum Robertson & Johannes Overgaard
When heated, insects lose coordinated movement followed by the onset of heat coma (critical thermal maximum, CTmax). These traits are popular measures to quantify interspecific and intraspecific differences in insect heat tolerance, and CTmax correlates well with current species distributions of insects, including Drosophila. Here, we examined the function of the central nervous system (CNS) in five species of Drosophila with different heat tolerances, while they were exposed to either constant high temperature or a...

Data from: Nest attentiveness drives nest predation in arctic sandpipers

Nicolas Meyer, Loïc Bollache, François-Xavier Dechaume-Moncharmont, Jerôme Moreau, Eve Afonso, Anders Angerbjörn, Joël Bety, Dorothee Ehrich, Vladimir Gilg, Marie-Andrée Giroux, Jannik Hansen, Richard Lanctot, Johannes Lang, Nicolas Lecomte, Laura McKinnon, Jeroen Reneerkens, Sarah Saalfeld, Brigitte Sabard, Niels Schmidt, Benoît Sittler, Paul Smith, Aleksandr Sokolov, Vasiliy Sokolov, Natalya Sokolova, Rob Van Bemmelen … & Olivier Gilg
Most birds incubate their eggs to allow embryo development. This behaviour limits the ability of adults to perform other activities. Hence, incubating adults trade-off incubation and nest protection with foraging to meet their own needs. Parents can either cooperate to sustain this trade-off or incubate alone. The main cause of reproductive failure at this reproductive stage is predation and adults reduce this risk by keeping the nest location secret. Arctic sandpipers are interesting biological models...

Data from: Cold-acclimation increases depolarization resistance and tolerance in muscle fibers from a chill-susceptible insect, Locusta migratoria

Jeppe Bayley, Jesper Sørensen, Martin Moos, Vladimír Koštál & Johannes Overgaard
Cold exposure depolarizes cells in insects due to a reduced electrogenic ion transport and a gradual increase in extracellular [K+]. Cold-induced depolarization is linked to cold injury in chill-susceptible insects, and the locust, Locusta migratoria, has shown improved cold tolerance following cold-acclimation through depolarization resistance. Here we investigate how cold-acclimation influences depolarization resistance and how this resistance relates to improved cold tolerance. To address this question, we investigated if cold-acclimation affects the electrogenic transport capacity...

Data set showing the number of tail scars of North American and Eurasian beavers

Martin Mayer
Intraspecific competition plays an important role for territory acquisition and occupancy, in turn affecting individual fitness. Thus, understanding the drivers of intraspecific aggression can increase our understanding of population dynamics. Here, we investigated intraspecific aggression in Eurasian (Castor fiber) and North American (C. canadensis) beavers that are both monogamous, territorial mammals. Combined, we examined tail scars from >1000 beavers (>2000 capture events) as part of two long-term studies in Norway and the USA. We investigated...

Genetic diversity and connectivity of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) found in the Brazil and Chile–Peru wintering grounds and the South Georgia (Islas Georgias del Sur) feeding ground

Emma L Carroll, Paulo Ott, Louise McMillan, Bárbara Galletti Vernazzani, Petra Neveceralova, Els Vermeulen, Oscar Gaggiotti, Artur Andriolo, C. Scott Baker, Connor Bamford, Peter Best, Elsa Cabrera, Susannah Calderan, Andrea Chirife, Rachel M. Fewster, Paulo A. C. Flores, Timothy Frasier, Thales R. O. Freitas, Karina Groch, Pavel Hulva, Amy Kennedy, Russell Leaper, Mathew S. Leslie, Michael Moore, Larissa Oliviera … & Jennifer A Jackson
As species recover from exploitation, continued assessments of connectivity and population structure are warranted to provide information for conservation and management. This is particularly true in species with high dispersal capacity, such as migratory whales, where patterns of connectivity could change rapidly. Here we build on a previous long-term, large-scale collaboration on southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) to combine new (nnew) and published (npub) mitochondrial (mtDNA) and microsatellite genetic data from all major wintering grounds...

Detecting shrub encroachment in semi-natural grasslands using UAS LiDAR

Bjarke Madsen, Urs Treier & Signe Normand
Shrub encroachment in semi-natural grasslands threatens local biodiversity unless management is applied to reduce shrub density. Dense vegetation of Cytisus scoparius homogenizes the landscape negatively affecting local plant diversity. Detecting structural change (e.g., biomass) is essential for assessing negative impacts of encroachment. Hence, exploring new monitoring tools to achieve this task is important for effectively capturing change and evaluating management activities. This study combines traditional field-based measurements with novel Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) observations...

Data from: Genome-wide association analysis of type 2 diabetes in the EPIC-InterAct study

Lina Cai, Eleanor Wheeler, Nicola D. Kerrison, Jian'an Luan, Panos Deloukas, Paul W. Franks, Pilar Amiano, Eva Ardanaz, Catalina Bonet, Guy Fagherazzi, Leif C. Groop, Rudolf Kaaks, José María Huerta, Giovanna Masala, Peter M. Nilsson, Kim Overvad, Valeria Pala, Salvatore Panico, Miguel Rodriguez-Barranco, Olov Rolandsson, Carlotta Sacerdote, Matthias B. Schulze, Annemieke M.W. Spijkeman, Anne Tjonneland, Rosario Tumino … & Nicholas J. Wareham
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a global public health challenge. Whilst the advent of genome-wide association studies has identified >400 genetic variants associated with T2D, our understanding of its biological mechanisms and translational insights is still limited. The EPIC-InterAct project, centred in 8 countries in the European Prospective Investigations into Cancer and Nutrition study, is one of the largest prospective studies of T2D. Established as a nested case-cohort study to investigate the interplay between genetic...

Food quality of Ephestia eggs, the aphid Rhopalosiphum padi and mixed diet for Orius majusculus

Søren Toft, Kim Jensen, Jesper Sørensen, Lene Sigsgaard & Martin Holmstrup
We studied the food quality of the aphid Rhopalosiphum padi to the pirate bug Orius majusculus using Ephestia eggs as high‐quality comparison prey. Several performance parameters were tested on individuals that had been reared and maintained on each of the two single‐prey diets or on a mixed diet. All fitness parameters were lower in individuals fed aphids only, indicating poor food quality of this prey. Compared with the pure Ephestia egg diet, the mixed diet...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    56

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    47
  • Text
    7
  • Audiovisual
    2

Affiliations

  • Aarhus University
    56
  • Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology
    7
  • University of Reading
    6
  • National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment
    4
  • University of Clermont Auvergne
    4
  • Wageningen University & Research
    4
  • Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador
    3
  • University of Gothenburg
    2
  • Aalborg University
    2
  • Technical University of Denmark
    2