59 Works

Data from: Y chromosome haplotype distribution of brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Northern Europe provides insight into population history and recovery (Ursus arctos)

Julia Schregel, Hans Geir Eiken, Finn Audun Grøndahl, Frank Hailer, Jouni Aspi, Ilpo Kojola, Konstantin Tirronen, Pjotr Danilov, Alexander Rykov, Eugene Poroshin, Axel Janke, Jon E. Swenson, Snorre B. Hagen & Piotr Danilov
High-resolution, male-inherited Y-chromosomal markers are a useful tool for population genetic analyses of wildlife species, but to date have only been applied in this context to relatively few species besides humans. Using nine Y-chromosomal STR and three Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphism markers (Y-SNPs), we studied whether male gene flow was important for the recent recovery of the brown bear (Ursus arctos) in Northern Europe, where the species declined dramatically in numbers and geographic distribution during...

Data from: Projecting consequences of global warming for the functional diversity of fleshy-fruited plants and frugivorous birds along a tropical elevational gradient

Larissa Nowak, W. Daniel Kissling, Irene M. A. Bender, D. Matthias Dehling, Till Töpfer, Katrin Böhning-Gaese & Matthias Schleuning
Aim: Species in ecological communities are linked by biotic interactions. It is therefore important to simultaneously study the impacts of global warming on interdependent taxa from different trophic levels. Here, we quantify current and potential future associations of functional diversity (based on multiple traits) and functional identity (based on individual traits) between interacting taxa using projection models under climate change. Location: A tropical elevational gradient (500–3500 m a.s.l.) in the Manú biosphere reserve, southeast Peru...

Data from: The future distribution of the savannah biome: model-based and biogeographic contingency

Glenn R. Moncrieff, Simon Scheiter, Liam Langan, Steven I. Higgins & Antonio Trabucco
The extent of the savanna biome is expected to be profoundly altered by climatic change and increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Contrasting projections are given when using different modelling approaches to estimate future distributions. Furthermore, biogeographic variation within savannas in plant function and structure is expected to lead to divergent responses to global change. Hence the use of a single model with a single savanna tree type will likely lead to biased projections. Here we compare...

How to quantify factors degrading DNA in the environment and predict degradation for effective sampling design

Thomas Naef, Anne-Laure Besnard, Lisa Lehnen, Eric J. Petit, Jaap Van Schaik & Sebastien J. Puechmaille
Extra-organismal DNA (eoDNA) from material left behind by organisms (non-invasive DNA: e.g., faeces, hair) or from environmental samples (eDNA: e.g., water, soil) is a valuable source of genetic information. However, the relatively low quality and quantity of eoDNA, which can be further degraded by environmental factors, results in reduced amplification and sequencing success. This is often compensated for through cost- and time-intensive replications of genotyping/sequencing procedures. Therefore, system- and site-specific quantifications of environmental degradation are...

Data from: Adaptive differentiation coincides with local bioclimatic conditions along an elevational cline in populations of a lichen-forming fungus

Francesco Dal Grande, Rahul Sharma, Anjuli Meiser, Gregor Rolshausen, Burkhard Buedel, Bagdevi Mishra, Marco Thines, Juergen Otte, Markus Pfenninger & Imke Schmitt
Background: Many fungal species occur across a variety of habitats. Particularly lichens, fungi forming symbioses with photosynthetic partners, have evolved remarkable tolerances for environmental extremes. Despite their ecological importance and ubiquity, little is known about the genetic basis of adaption in lichen populations. Here we studied patterns of genome-wide differentiation in the lichen-forming fungus Lasallia pustulata along an altitudinal gradient in the Mediterranean region. We resequenced six populations as pools and identified highly differentiated genomic...

Data from: Social learning of migratory performance

Thomas Mueller, Robert B. O’Hara, Sarah J. Converse, Richard P. Urbanek & William F. Fagan
Successful bird migration can depend on individual learning, social learning, and innate navigation programs. Using 8 years of data on migrating whooping cranes, we were able to partition genetic and socially learned aspects of migration. Specifically, we analyzed data from a reintroduced population wherein all birds were captive bred and artificially trained by ultralight aircraft on their first lifetime migration. For subsequent migrations, in which birds fly individually or in groups but without ultralight escort,...

Data from: Community functional trait composition at the continental scale: the effects of non-ecological processes

A. Michelle Lawing, Jussi T. Eronen, Jessica L. Blois, Catherine H. Graham & P. David Polly
Ecological communities and their response to environmental gradients are increasingly being described by measures of trait composition at the community level – the trait-based approach. Whether ecological or non-ecological processes influence trait composition between communities has been debated. Understanding the processes that influence trait composition is important for reconstructing paleoenvironmental conditions from fossil deposits and for understanding changes in community functionality through time. Here, we assess the influence of ecological and non-ecological processes on the...

Data from: Coalescent-based species delimitation approach uncovers high cryptic diversity in the cosmopolitan lichen-forming fungal genus Protoparmelia (Lecanorales, Ascomycota)

Garima Singh, Francesco Dal Grande, Pradeep K. Divakar, Jürgen Otte, Steven D. Leavitt, Katarzyna Szczepanska, Ana Crespo, Víctor J. Rico, André Aptroot, Marcela Eugenia Da Silva Cáceres, H. Thorsten Lumbsch & Imke Schmitt
Species recognition in lichen-forming fungi has been a challenge because of unsettled species concepts, few taxonomically relevant traits, and limitations of traditionally used morphological and chemical characters for identifying closely related species. Here we analyze species diversity in the cosmopolitan genus Protoparmelia s.l. The ~25 described species in this group occur across diverse habitats from the boreal -arctic/alpine to the tropics, but their relationship to each other remains unexplored. In this study, we inferred the...

Data from: A tale of two seasons: the link between seasonal migration and climatic niches in passerine birds.

Alison Eyres
The question of whether migratory birds track a specific climatic niche by seasonal movements has important implications for understanding the evolution of migration, the factors affecting species’ distributions and the responses of migrants to climate change. Despite much research, previous studies of bird migration have produced mixed results. However, whether migrants track climate is only one half of the question, the other being why residents remain in the same geographic range year-round. We provide a...

Independent variation of avian sensitivity to climate change and trait-based adaptive capacity along a tropical elevational gradient

Larissa Nowak, Matthias Schleuning, Irene Bender, W. Daniel Kissling & Susanne Fritz
Aim: How species respond to climate change is influenced by their sensitivity to climatic conditions (i.e., their climatic niche) and aspects of their adaptive capacity (e.g., their dispersal ability, ecological niche). To date, it is largely unknown whether and how species’ sensitivity to climate change and their adaptive capacity covary. However, understanding this relationship is important to predict the potential consequences of a changing climate for species assemblages. Here, we test how species’ sensitivity to...

Variable relationships between trait diversity and avian ecological functions in agroecosystems

Rocío Peña, Matthias Schleuning, Marcos Miñarro & Daniel García
1) The diversity of traits within animal assemblages has been shown to affect the magnitude of animal-provided ecological functions. However, little is known about how consistent trait diversity effects are across ecological functions and ecosystems. More importantly, the importance of trait diversity in driving ecosystem functioning, relative to other components of biodiversity, has rarely been assessed. It also remains unclear how environmental gradients filter trait diversity and, ultimately, modulate ecological functions. 2) Here we test...

Gross primary production responses to warming, elevated CO2 , and irrigation: quantifying the drivers of ecosystem physiology in a semiarid grassland

Elise Pendall, Edmund M. Ryan, Kiona Ogle, Drew Peltier, David G. Williams, Anthony P. Walker, Martin G. De Kauwe, Belinda E. Medlyn, William Parton, Shinichi Asao, Bertrand Guenet, Anna B. Harper, Xingjie Lu, Kristina A. Luus, Sönke Zaehle, Shijie Shu, Christian Werner & Jianyang Xia
Determining whether the terrestrial biosphere will be a source or sink of carbon (C) under a future climate of elevated CO2 (eCO2) and warming requires accurate quantification of gross primary production (GPP), the largest flux of C in the global C cycle. We evaluated 6 years (2007–2012) of flux‐derived GPP data from the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment, situated in a grassland in Wyoming, USA. The GPP data were used to calibrate a...

Stakeholder priorities determine the impact of an alien tree invasion on ecosystem multifunctionality

Theo Linders, Urs Schaffner, Tena Alamirew, Eric Allan, Simon Choge, René Eschen, Hailu Shiferaw & Peter Manning
1. While the ecological impact of environmental change drivers, such as alien plant invasions, is relatively well-described, quantitative social-ecological studies detailing how these changes impact multiple ecosystem services, and subsequently stakeholders, are lacking. 2. We used a social-ecological approach to assess how Prosopis juliflora (Prosopis henceforth)¸ an invasive tree, affects the provision of multiple ecosystem services to different stakeholder groups in a degraded East African dryland. We combined plot-based ecological data on the impacts of...

Source matrices used to obtain the trophic and spatial seed dispersal networks

Beatriz Rumeu, Isabel Donoso, Javier Rodríguez-Pérez & Daniel García
1. Trophic relationships have inherent spatial dimensions associated with the sites where species interactions, or their delayed effects, occur. Trophic networks among interacting species may thus be coupled with spatial networks linking species and habitats whereby animals connect patches across the landscape thanks to their high mobility. This trophic and spatial duality is especially inherent in processes like seed dispersal by animals, where frugivores consume fruit species and deposit seeds across habitats. 2. We analysed...

Population analysis of retrotransposons in giraffe genomes supports RTE decline and widespread LINE1 activity in Giraffidae

Malte Petersen, Sven Winter, Raphael T. F. Coimbra, Menno J. De-Jong, Vladimir V. Kapitonov & Maria A. Nilsson
The majority of structural variation in genomes is caused by insertions of transposable elements (TEs). In mammalian genomes, the main TE fraction is made up of autonomous and non-autonomous non-LTR retrotransposons commonly known as LINEs and SINEs (Long and Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements). Here we present one of the first population-level analysis of TE insertions in a non-model organism, the giraffe. Giraffes are ruminant artiodactyls, one of the few mammalian groups with genomes that are...

SNP matrices and vcf files for phylogenetic, genetic structure and historical demographic analyses of Podocarpus from Hispaniola

Maria Esther Nieto-Blazquez
Aim: Hispaniola is the second largest island in the Caribbean and a hotspot of biodiversity. The island was formed by the fusion of a northern and southern palaeo-islands during the mid-Miocene (15 Ma). The historical split of Hispaniola together with repeated marine incursions during the Pleistocene are known to have influenced lineage divergence and genetic structure in a few birds and mammals, but the effect on vascular plants is less understood. The conifer genus Podocarpus...

Data from: Informing conservation strategies with museum genomics: Long-term effects of past anthropogenic persecution on the elusive European wildcat

Alina Von Thaden, Berardino Cocchiararo, Sarah Ashley Mueller, Tobias Erik Reiners, Katharina Reinert, Iris Tuchscherer, Axel Janke & Carsten Nowak
Like many carnivore species, European wildcats (Felis silvestris) have suffered severe anthropogenic population declines in the past, resulting in a strong population bottleneck in the beginning of the 20th century. In Germany, the species has managed to survive its near-extinction in small isolated areas and is currently recolonizing former habitats owing to legal protection and concerted conservation efforts. Here, we SNP genotyped and mtDNA sequenced 56 historical and 650 contemporary samples to assess the impact...

Social environment shapes female settlement decisions in a solitary carnivore

Jenny Hansen, Anne Hertel, Shane Frank, Jonas Kindberg & Andreas Zedrosser
How and where a female selects an area to settle and breed is of central importance in dispersal and population ecology as it governs range expansion and gene flow. Social structure and organization have been shown to influence settlement decisions, but its importance in settlement of large, solitary mammals is largely unknown. We investigate how the identity of overlapping conspecifics on the landscape, acquired during the maternal care period, influences selection of settlement home ranges...

Avian seed dispersal may be insufficient for plants to track future temperature change on tropical mountains

Larissa Nowak, Matthias Schleuning, Irene M. A. Bender, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, D. Matthias Dehling, Susanne A. Fritz, W. Daniel Kissling, Thomas Mueller, Eike Lena Neuschulz, Alex L. Pigot, Marjorie C. Sorensen & Isabel Donoso
Abstract Aim: Climate change causes species’ range shifts globally. Terrestrial plant species often lag behind temperature shifts, and it is unclear to what extent animal-dispersed plants can track climate change. Here, we estimate the ability of bird-dispersed plant species to track future temperature change on a tropical mountain. Location: Tropical elevational gradient (500–3500 m a.s.l.) in the Manú biosphere reserve, Peru Time period: 1960–1990 to 2061–2080 Taxa: Fleshy-fruited plants, avian frugivores Methods: Using simulations based...

Data from: Unique evolutionary trajectories in repeated adaptation to hydrogen sulphide-toxic habitats of a neotropical fish (Poecilia mexicana)

Markus Pfenninger, Simit Patel, Lenin Arias-Rodriguez, Barbara Feldmeyer, Rüdiger Riesch & Martin Plath
Replicated ecological gradients are prime systems to study processes of molecular evolution underlying ecological divergence. Here, we investigated the repeated adaptation of the neotropical fish Poecilia mexicana to habitats containing toxic hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and compared two population pairs of sulphide-adapted and ancestral fish by sequencing population pools of >200 individuals (Pool-Seq). We inferred the evolutionary processes shaping divergence and tested the hypothesis of increase of parallelism from SNPs to molecular pathways. Coalescence analyses showed...

Data from: Unifying latitudinal gradients in range size and richness across marine and terrestrial systems

Adam Tomasovych, Jonathan D. Kennedy, Tristan J. Betzner, Nicole Bitler Kuehnle, Stewart Edie, Sora Kim, K. Supriya, Alexander E. White, Carsten Rahbek, Shan Huang, Trevor D. Price & David Jablonski
Many marine and terrestrial clades show similar latitudinal gradients in species richness, but opposite gradients in range size—on land, ranges are the smallest in the tropics, whereas in the sea, ranges are the largest in the tropics. Therefore, richness gradients in marine and terrestrial systems do not arise from a shared latitudinal arrangement of species range sizes. Comparing terrestrial birds and marine bivalves, we find that gradients in range size are concordant at the level...

Data from: Evolutionary processes, dispersal limitation and climatic history shape current diversity patterns of European dragonflies

Stefan Pinkert, Klaas-Douwe B. Dijkstra, Dirk Zeuss, Christoph Reudenbach, Roland Brandl & Christian Hof
We investigated the effects of contemporary and historical factors on the spatial variation of European dragonfly diversity. Specifically, we tested to what extent patterns of endemism and phylogenetic diversity of European dragonfly assemblages are structured by (i) phylogenetic conservatism of thermal adaptations and (ii) differences in the ability of post-glacial recolonization by species adapted to running waters (lotic) and still waters (lentic). We investigated patterns of dragonfly diversity using digital distribution maps and a phylogeny...

Data from: Quantifying the climatic niche of symbiont partners in a lichen symbiosis indicates mutualist-mediated niche expansions

Gregor Rolshausen, Francesco Dal Grande, Anna Sadowska-Deś, Juergen Otte & Imke Schmitt
The large distributional areas and ecological niches of many lichenized fungi may in part be due to the plasticity in interactions between the fungus (mycobiont) and its algal or cyanobacterial partners (photobionts). On the one hand, broad-scale phylogenetic analyses show that partner compatibility in lichens is rather constrained and shaped by reciprocal selection pressures and codiversification independent of ecological drivers. On the other hand, sub-species-level associations among lichen symbionts appear to be environmentally structured rather...

Data from: Cross-taxa generalities in the relationship between population abundance and ambient temperatures

Diana E. Bowler, Peter Haase, Christian Hof, Ingrid Kröncke, Léon Baert, Wouter Dekoninck, Sami Domisch, Frederik Hendrickx, Thomas Hickler, Hermann Neumann, Robert B. O'Hara, Anne F. Sell, Moritz Sonnewald, Stefan Stoll, Michael Türkay, Roel Van Klink, Oliver Schweiger, Rikjan Vermeulen & Katrin Boehning-Gaese
Identifying patterns in the effects of temperature on species' population abundances could help develop a general framework for predicting the consequences of climate change across different communities and realms. We used long-term population time series data from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine species communities within central Europe to compare the effects of temperature on abundance across a broad range of taxonomic groups. We asked whether there was an average relationship between temperatures in different seasons and...

Data from: Positive selection in development and growth rate regulation genes involved in species divergence of the genus Radix

Barbara Feldmeyer, Bastian Greshake, Elisabeth Funke, Simit Patel, Ingo Ebersberger & Markus Pfenninger
Background: Life history traits like developmental time, age and size at maturity are directly related to fitness in all organisms and play a major role in adaptive evolution and speciation processes. Comparative genomic or transcriptomic approaches to identify positively selected genes involved in species divergence can help to generate hypotheses on the driving forces behind speciation. Here we use a bottom-up approach to investigate this hypothesis by comparative analysis of orthologous transcripts of four closely...

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