12 Works

Data from: Comparative transcriptomic analysis of the mechanisms underpinning ageing and fecundity in social insects

Judith Korb, Karen Meusemann, Denise Aumer, Abel Bernadou, Daniel Elsner, Barbara Feldmeyer, Susanne Foitzik, Jürgen Heinze, Romain Libbrecht, Silu Lin, Megha Majoe, José Manuel Monroy Kuhn, Volker Nehring, Matteo A. Negroni, Robert J. Paxton, Alice C. Séguret, Marah Stoldt & Thomas Flatt
Exceptional longevity of social insect queens despite their lifelong high fecundity remains poorly understood in ageing biology. To gain insights into the mechanisms that might underlie ageing in social insects, we compared gene expression patterns between young and old castes (both queens and workers) across different lineages of social insects (two termite, two bee and two ant species). After global analyses, we paid particular attention to genes of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signalling (IIS)/target...

Pacific Introduced Flora (PacIFLora)

Michael Wohlwend, Dylan Craven, Patrick Weigelt, Hanno Seebens, Marten Winter, Holger Kreft, Wayne Dawson, Franz Essl, Mark Van Kleunen, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, James Space, Philip Thomas & Tiffany Knight
The Pacific region has the highest density of naturalized plant species worldwide, which makes it an important area for research on the ecology, evolution and biogeography of biological invasions. While different data sources on naturalized plant species exist for the Pacific, there is no taxonomically and spatially harmonized database available for different subsets of species and islands. A comprehensive, accessible database containing the distribution of naturalized vascular plant species in the Pacific will enable new...

ANDEAN frugivory: data on plant–bird interactions and functional traits of plant and bird species from montane forests along the Andes

D. Matthias Dehling, Irene M. A. Bender, Pedro G. Blendinger, Marcia C. Muñoz, Marta Quitián, Francisco Saavedra, Vinicio Santillán, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Eike-Lena Neuschulz & Matthias Schleuning
Species differ in their resource use and their interactions with other species and, consequently, they fulfil different functional roles in ecological processes. Species with specialized functional roles (specialists) are considered important for communities because they often interact with species with which few other species interact, thereby contributing complementary functional roles to ecological processes. However, the contribution of specialists could be low if they only interact with a small range of interaction partners. In contrast, species...

Global impacts of climate change on avian functional diversity

Peter Stewart, Alke Voskamp, Luca Santini, Matthias Biber, Adam Devenish, Christian Hof, Stephen Willis & Joseph Tobias
Climate change is predicted to drive geographical range shifts, leading to fluctuations in species richness worldwide. However, the effect of these changes on functional diversity remains unclear, in part because comprehensive species-level trait data are generally lacking at global scales. Here we use morphometric and ecological traits for 8268 bird species to estimate the impact of climate change on avian functional diversity (FD). We show that future bird assemblages are likely to undergo substantial shifts...

Projected climatic changes lead to biome changes in areas of previously constant biome

Brian Huntley, Judy Allen, Matthew Forrest, Thomas Hickler, Ralf Ohlemüller, Joy Singarayer & Paul Valdes
Aim: Recent studies in southern Africa identified past biome stability as an important predictor of biodiversity. We aimed to assess the extent to which past biome stability predicts present global biodiversity patterns, and the extent to which projected climatic changes may lead to eventual biome changes in areas with constant past biome. Location: Global. Taxon: Spermatophyta; terrestrial vertebrates. Methods: Biome constancy was assessed and mapped using results from 89 dynamic global vegetation model simulations, driven...

The influence of biogeographical and evolutionary histories on morphological trait-matching and resource specialization in mutualistic hummingbird-plant networks

Bo Dalsgaard, Pietro Maruyama, Jesper Sonne, Katrine Hansen, Thais Zanata, Stefan Abrahamczyk, Ruben Alarcon, Andréa Araujo, Francielle Araújo, Silvana Buzato, Edgar Chávez-González, Aline Coelho, Pete Cotton, Román Díaz-Valenzuela, Maria Dufke, Paula Enríquez, Manoel Martins Dias Filho, Erich Fischer, Glauco Kohler, Carlos Lara, Flor Maria Las-Casas, Liliana Rosero Lasprilla, Adriana Machado, Caio Machado, Maria Maglianesi … & Ana M. Martín González
Functional traits can determine pairwise species interactions, such as those between plants and pollinators. However, the effects of biogeography and evolutionary history on trait-matching and trait-mediated resource specialization remain poorly understood. We compiled a database of 93 mutualistic hummingbird-plant networks (including 181 hummingbird and 1,256 plant species), complemented by morphological measures of hummingbird bill and floral corolla length. We divided the hummingbirds into their principal clades and used knowledge on hummingbird biogeography to divide the...

Data from: Within-species trait variation can lead to size limitations in seed dispersal of small-fruited plants

Finn Rehling, Bogdan Jaroszewicz, Leonie Braasch, Jörg Albrecht, Pedro Jordano, Jan Schlautmann, Nina Farwig & Dana Schabo
The inability of small-gaped animals to consume very large fruits may limit seed dispersal of the respective plants. This has often been shown for large-fruited plant species that remain poorly dispersed when large-gaped animal species are lost due to anthropogenic pressure. Little is known about whether gape-size limitations similarly influence seed dispersal of small-fruited plant species that can show a large variation in fruit size within species. In this study, fruit sizes of 15 plant...

Data from: Observing frugivores or collecting scats: A method comparison to construct quantitative seed dispersal networks

Jan Schlautmann, Finn Rehling, Jörg Albrecht, Bogdan Jaroszewicz, Dana G. Schabo & Nina Farwig
Mutualistic interactions form the basis for many ecological processes and are often analyzed within the framework of ecological networks. These interactions can be sampled with a range of methods and first analyses of pollination networks sampled with different methods showed differences in common network metrics. However, it is yet unknown if metrics of seed dispersal networks are similarly affected by the sampling method and if different methods detect a complementary set of frugivores. This is...

Stakeholder priorities determine the impact of an alien tree invasion on ecosystem multifunctionality

Theo Linders, Urs Schaffner, Tena Alamirew, Eric Allan, Simon Choge, René Eschen, Hailu Shiferaw & Peter Manning
1. While the ecological impact of environmental change drivers, such as alien plant invasions, is relatively well-described, quantitative social-ecological studies detailing how these changes impact multiple ecosystem services, and subsequently stakeholders, are lacking. 2. We used a social-ecological approach to assess how Prosopis juliflora (Prosopis henceforth)¸ an invasive tree, affects the provision of multiple ecosystem services to different stakeholder groups in a degraded East African dryland. We combined plot-based ecological data on the impacts of...

SNP matrices and vcf files for phylogenetic, genetic structure and historical demographic analyses of Podocarpus from Hispaniola

Maria Esther Nieto-Blazquez
Aim: Hispaniola is the second largest island in the Caribbean and a hotspot of biodiversity. The island was formed by the fusion of a northern and southern palaeo-islands during the mid-Miocene (15 Ma). The historical split of Hispaniola together with repeated marine incursions during the Pleistocene are known to have influenced lineage divergence and genetic structure in a few birds and mammals, but the effect on vascular plants is less understood. The conifer genus Podocarpus...

Social environment shapes female settlement decisions in a solitary carnivore

Jenny Hansen, Anne Hertel, Shane Frank, Jonas Kindberg & Andreas Zedrosser
How and where a female selects an area to settle and breed is of central importance in dispersal and population ecology as it governs range expansion and gene flow. Social structure and organization have been shown to influence settlement decisions, but its importance in settlement of large, solitary mammals is largely unknown. We investigate how the identity of overlapping conspecifics on the landscape, acquired during the maternal care period, influences selection of settlement home ranges...

Data from: Informing conservation strategies with museum genomics: Long-term effects of past anthropogenic persecution on the elusive European wildcat

Alina Von Thaden, Berardino Cocchiararo, Sarah Ashley Mueller, Tobias Erik Reiners, Katharina Reinert, Iris Tuchscherer, Axel Janke & Carsten Nowak
Like many carnivore species, European wildcats (Felis silvestris) have suffered severe anthropogenic population declines in the past, resulting in a strong population bottleneck in the beginning of the 20th century. In Germany, the species has managed to survive its near-extinction in small isolated areas and is currently recolonizing former habitats owing to legal protection and concerted conservation efforts. Here, we SNP genotyped and mtDNA sequenced 56 historical and 650 contemporary samples to assess the impact...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre
    12
  • Durham University
    3
  • University of Warsaw
    2
  • Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg
    2
  • Universidad Católica de Cuenca
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • University of Münster
    1
  • Universidad Mayor
    1
  • Federal University of São Carlos
    1
  • Tokyo Metropolitan University
    1