16 Works

Data from: Variation in individual temperature preferences, not behavioural fever, affects susceptibility to chytridiomycosis in amphibians

Erin L. Sauer, Rebecca C. Fuller, Corinne L. Richards-Zawacki, Julia Sonn, Jinelle H. Sperry & Jason R. Rohr
The ability of wildlife populations to mount rapid responses to novel pathogens will be critical for mitigating the impacts of disease outbreaks in a changing climate. Field studies have documented that amphibians preferring warmer temperatures are less likely to be infected with the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). However, it is unclear whether this phenomenon is driven by behavioural fever or natural variation in thermal preference. Here, we placed frogs in thermal gradients, tested for...

Data from: Nitrogen fertilization differentially enhances nodulation and host growth of two invasive legume species in an urban environment

Nicole J. Forrester & Tia-Lynn Ashman
Invasive plants negatively impact native communities by altering ecosystem processes and reducing species diversity. Plants in the legume family are overrepresented among invasive taxa and establish in disturbed environments common in urban ecosystems. Mutualisms with rhizobia and anthropogenic activities, such as nitrogen fertilization, may be key mechanisms driving legume invasions of urban habitats. Moreover, legume species and genetic lineages within species may vary in their responses to nitrogen fertilization, making some more likely to invade...

Data from: Male-male aggression is unlikely to stabilize a poison frog polymorphism

Yusan Yang, Matthew B. Dugas, Houston J. Sudekum, Sean N. Murphy & Corinne L. Richards-Zawacki
Phenotypic polymorphism is common in animals, and the maintenance of multiple phenotypes in a population requires forces that act against homogenizing drift and selection. Male-male competition can contribute to the stability of a polymorphism when males compete primarily with males of the same phenotype. In and around a contact zone between red and blue lineages of the poison frog Oophaga pumilio, we used simulated territorial intrusions to test the non-exclusive predictions that males would direct...

Data from: Glucocorticoid-environment relationships align with responses to environmental change in two co-occurring congeners

Talisin T. Hammond, Rupert Palme & Eileen A. Lacey
As more species undergo range shifts in response to climate change, it is increasingly important to understand the factors that determine an organism’s realized niche. Physiological limits imposed by abiotic factors constrain the distributions of many species. Because glucocorticoids are essential to the maintenance of physiological homeostasis, identifying glucocorticoid-environment relationships may generate critical insights into both limits on species distributions and potential responses to environmental change. We explored relationships between variability in baseline glucocorticoids and...

Data from: Adaptation, chance, and history in experimental evolutionary reversals to unicellularity

María Rebolleda-Gómez & Michael Travisano
Evolution is often deemed irreversible. The evolution of complex traits that require many mutations makes their reversal unlikely. Even in simpler traits, reversals might become less likely as neutral or beneficial mutations, with deleterious effects in the ancestral context, become fixed in the novel background. This is especially true in changes that involve large re-organizations of the organism and its interactions with the environment. The evolution of multicellularity involves the reorganization of previously autonomous cells...

Data from: The evolution of floral sonication, a pollen foraging behavior used by bees (Anthophila)

Sophie Cardinal, Stephen L. Buchmann & Avery Leigh Russell
Over 22,000 species of biotically pollinated flowering plants, including some major agricultural crops, depend primarily on bees capable of floral sonication for pollination services. The ability to sonicate (“buzz”) flowers is widespread in bees but not ubiquitous. Despite the prevalence of this pollinator behavior and its importance to natural and agricultural systems, the evolutionary history of floral sonication in bees has not been previously studied. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of floral sonication in...

Data from: Temperature dependent effects of cutaneous bacteria on a frog's tolerance of fungal infection

Matthew J. Robak & Corinne L. Richards-Zawacki
Defense against pathogens is one of many benefits that bacteria provide to animal hosts. A clearer understanding of how changes in the environment affect the interactions between animals and their microbial benefactors is needed in order to predict the impact and dynamics of emerging animal diseases. Due to its dramatic effects on the physiology of animals and their pathogens, temperature may be a key variable modulating the level of protection that beneficial bacteria provide to...

Data from: Rapid divergence of wing volatile profiles between subspecies of the butterfly Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

Eden W. McQueen & Nathan I. Morehouse
Complex signaling traits such as pheromone profiles can play an important role in the early stages of reproductive isolation between populations. These signals can diverge along multiple trait axes, and signal receivers are often sensitive to subtle differences in signal properties. In the Lepidoptera, prior research has highlighted that natural selection can drive rapid chemical signal divergence, for instance via mate recognition to maintain species boundaries. Much less is known about the occurrence of such...

Data from: Longitudinal cognitive and biomarker changes in dominantly inherited Alzheimer disease

Eric McDade, Guoqiao Wang, Brian Andrew Gordon, Jason Hassenstab, Tammie L.S. Benzinger, Virginia Buckles, Anne M. Fagan, David M. Holtzman, Nigel J. Cairns, Alison M. Goate, Daniel S. Marcus, John C. Morris, Katrina Paumier, Chengjie Xiong, Ricardo Allegri, Sarah B. Berman, William Klunk, James Nobel, John Ringman, Bernardino Ghetti, Martin Farlow, Reisa Anne Sperling, Jasmeer Chhatwal, Stephen Salloway, Neil R. Graff-Radford … & Randall J. Bateman
Objective: To assess the onset, sequence and rate of progression of comprehensive biomarker and clinical measures across the spectrum of Alzheimer disease using the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) study and compare these to cross-sectional estimates. Methods: We conducted longitudinal clinical, cognitive, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging assessments (mean of 2.7 (+/- 1.1) visits) in 217 DIAN participants. Linear mixed effects models were used to assess changes in each measure relative to individuals’ estimated years...

Data from: Parallel genetic adaptation across environments differing in mode of growth or resource availability

Caroline B. Turner, Christopher W. Marshall & Vaughn S. Cooper
Evolution experiments have demonstrated high levels of genetic parallelism between populations evolving in identical environments. However, natural populations evolve in complex environments that can vary in many ways, likely sharing some characteristics but not others. Here we ask whether shared selection pressures drive parallel evolution across distinct environments. We addressed this question in experimentally evolved populations founded from a clone of the bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia. These populations evolved for 90 days (approximately 600 generations) under...

Data from: Social interactions shape individual and collective personality in social spiders

Edmund R. Hunt, Brian Mi, Camila Fernandez, Brandyn M. Wong, Jonathan N. Pruitt & Noa Pinter-Wollman
The behavioural composition of a group and the dynamics of social interactions can both influence how social animals work collectively. For example, individuals exhibiting certain behavioural tendencies may have a disproportionately large impact on the group, and so are referred to as keystone individuals, while interactions between individuals can facilitate information transmission about resources. Despite the potential impact of both behavioural composition and interactions on collective behaviour, the relationship between consistent behaviours, also known as...

Data from: Revisiting protein aggregation as pathogenic in sporadic Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases

Alberto J. Espay, Joaquin A. Vizcarra, Luca Marsili, Anthony E. Lang, David K. Simon, Aristide Merola, Keith A. Josephs, Alfonso Fasano, Francesca Morgante, Rodolfo Savica, J. Timothy Greenamyre, Franca Cambi, Tritia R. Yamasaki, Caroline M. Tanner, Ziv Gan-Or, Irene Litvan, Ignacio F. Mata, Cyrus P. Zabetian, Patrik Brundin, Hubert H. Fernandez, David G. Standaert, Marcelo A. Kauffman, Michael A. Schwarzschild, S. Pablo Sardi, Todd Sherer … & James B. Leverenz
The gold standard for a definitive diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the pathologic finding of aggregated alpha-synuclein into Lewy bodies and for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) aggregated amyloid into plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau into tangles. Implicit in this clinico-pathologic-based nosology is the assumption that pathological protein aggregation at autopsy reflect pathogenesis at disease onset. While these aggregates may in exceptional cases be on a causal pathway in humans (e.g., aggregated alpha-synuclein in SNCA gene multiplication...

Data from: GloPL, a global data base on pollen limitation of plant reproduction

Joanne. M. Bennett, Janette. A. Steets, Jean. H. Burns, Walter Durka, Jana. C. Vamosi, Gerardo Arceo-Gómez, Martin Burd, Laura. A. Burkle, Allan. G Ellis, Leandro Freitas, Junmin Li, James. G. Rodger, Marina Wolowski, Jing Xia, Tia-Lynn Ashman & Tiffany. M. Knight
Plant reproduction relies on transfer of pollen from anthers to stigmas, and the majority of flowering plants depend on biotic or abiotic agents for this transfer. A key metric for characterizing if pollen receipt is insufficient for reproduction is pollen limitation, which is assessed by pollen supplementation experiments. In a pollen supplementation experiment, fruit or seed production by flowers exposed to natural pollination is compared to that following hand pollination either by pollen supplementation (i.e....

Data from: Selection, periodicity and potential function for highly iterative Palindrome-1 (HIP1) in cyanobacterial genomes

Minli Xu, Jeffrey G. Lawrence & Dannie Durand
Highly Iterated Palindrome 1 (HIP1, GCGATCGC) is hyper-abundant in most cyanobacterial genomes. In some cyanobacteria, average HIP1 abundance exceeds one motif per gene. Such high abundance suggests a significant role in cyanobacterial biology. However, 20 years of study have not revealed whether HIP1 has a function, much less what that function might be. We show that HIP1 is 15-300 fold over-represented in genomes analysed. More importantly, HIP1 sites are conserved both within and between open...

Data from: Information-theoretic analysis of realistic odor plumes: what cues are useful for determining location?

Sebastian D. Boie, Erin G. Connor, Margaret McHugh, Katherine I. Nagel, G. Bard Ermentrout, John P. Crimaldi & Jonathan D. Victor
Many species rely on olfaction to navigate towards food sources or mates. Olfactory navigation is a challenging task since odor environments are typically turbulent. While time-averaged odor concentration varies smoothly with the distance to the source, instaneous concentrations are intermittent and obtaining stable averages takes longer than the typical intervals between animals’ navigation decisions. How to effectively sample from the odor distribution to determine sampling location is the focus on this article. To investigate which...

Data from: Effect of IV glyburide on adjudicated edema endpoints in the GAMES-RP Trial

W. Taylor Kimberly, Matthew B. Bevers, Rüdiger Von Kummer, Andrew M. Demchuk, Javier M. Romero, Jordan J. Elm, Holly E. Hinson, Bradley J. Molyneaux, J. Marc Simard & Kevin Navin Sheth
Objective: In this secondary analysis of the GAMES-RP trial, we report the effect of IV glyburide on adjudicated, edema-related endpoints. Methods: Blinded adjudicators assigned designations for hemorrhagic transformation, neurological deterioration, malignant edema and edema-related death to patients from the GAMES-RP Phase II randomized controlled trial of IV glyburide for large hemispheric infarct. Rates of these endpoints were compared between treatment arms in the per-protocol sample. In those participants with malignant edema, the effects of treatment...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    16

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    16

Affiliations

  • University of Pittsburgh
    16
  • Massachusetts General Hospital
    3
  • Tulane University
    3
  • University of California, San Diego
    2
  • University of Calgary
    2
  • New York University Langone Medical Center
    1
  • University of Alabama at Birmingham
    1
  • Oregon Health & Science University
    1
  • Columbia University
    1
  • VA Puget Sound Health Care System
    1