3 Works

Data from: Modularity and scaling in fast movements: power amplification in mantis shrimp

Thomas Claverie, Elliot Chan & Sheila N. Patek
Extremely fast animal actions are accomplished with mechanisms that reduce the duration of movement. This process is known as power amplification. While many studies have examined the morphology and performance of power-amplified systems, little is known about their development and evolution. Here we examine scaling and modularity in the powerful predatory appendages of a mantis shrimp, Gonodactylaceus falcatus (Crustacea, Stomatopoda). We propose that power-amplified systems can be divided into three units: an engine (e.g., muscle),...

Data from: Angiosperm wood structure: global patterns in vessel anatomy and their relationship to wood density and potential conductivity

Amy E. Zanne, Mark Westoby, Daniel S. Falster, David D. Ackerly, Scott R Loarie, Sarah E. J. Arnold & David A. Coomes
Woody stems comprise a large biological carbon fraction and determine water transport between roots and leaves; their structure and function can influence both carbon and hydrological cycles. While angiosperm wood anatomy and density determine hydraulic conductivity and mechanical strength, little is known about interrelations across many species. We compiled a global dataset comprising two anatomical traits for 3005 woody angiosperms: mean vessel lumen area ( ) and number per unit area (N). From these, we...

Data from: Genetic signature of population fragmentation varies with mobility in seven bird species of a fragmented Kenyan cloud forest

Tom Callens, Peter Galbusera, Erik Matthysen, Eric Y Durand, Mwangi Githiru, Jeroen R Huyghe & Luc Lens
Habitat fragmentation can restrict geneflow, reduce neighbourhood effective population size, and increase genetic drift and inbreeding in small, isolated habitat remnants. The extent to which habitat fragmentation leads to population fragmentation, however, differs among landscapes and taxa. Commonly, researchers use information on the current status of a species to predict population effects of habitat fragmentation. Such methods, however, do not convey information on species-specific responses to fragmentation. Here we compare levels of past population differentiation,...

Registration Year

  • 2010
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • University of California, Berkeley
    3
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • University of Antwerp
    1
  • Ghent University
    1
  • Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • Macquarie University
    1
  • Queen Mary University of London
    1
  • University of Missouri
    1
  • National Museums of Kenya
    1