4 Works

Data from: Experimental evolution of an emerging plant virus in host genotypes that differ in their susceptibility to infection

Julia Hillung, José M. Cuevas, Sergi Valverde & Santiago F. Elena
This study evaluates the extent to which genetic differences among host individuals from the same species conditions the evolution of a plant RNA virus. We performed a three-fold replicated evolution experiment in which Tobacco etch potyvirus isolate At17b (TEV-At17b), adapted to Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Ler-0, was serially passaged in five genetically heterogeneous ecotypes of A. thaliana. After 15 passages we found that evolved viruses improved their fitness, showed higher infectivity and stronger virulence in their...

Data from: Courting disaster: how diversification rate affects fitness under risk

William C. Ratcliff, Peter Hawthorne & Eric Libby
Life is full of risk. To deal with this uncertainty, many organisms have evolved bet-hedging strategies that spread risk through phenotypic diversification. These rates of diversification can vary by orders of magnitude in different species. Here we examine how key characteristics of risk and organismal ecology affect the fitness consequences of variation in diversification rate. We find that rapid diversification is strongly favored when the risk faced has a wide spatial extent, with a single...

Data from: Increased gene dosage plays a predominant role in the initial stages of evolution of duplicate TEM-1 beta lactamase genes

Riddhiman Dhar, Tobias Bergmiller & Andreas Wagner
Gene duplication is important in evolution, because it provides new raw material for evolutionary adaptations. Several existing hypotheses about the causes of duplicate retention and diversification differ in their emphasis on gene dosage, sub-functionalization, and neo-functionalization. Little experimental data exists on the relative importance of gene expression changes and changes in coding regions for the evolution of duplicate genes. Furthermore, we do not know how strongly the environment could affect this importance. To address these...

Data from: Highly resolved early Eocene food webs show development of modern trophic structure after the end-Cretaceous extinction

Conrad C. Labandeira & Jennifer A. Dunne
Generalities of food web structure have been identified for extant ecosystems. However, the trophic organization of ancient ecosystems is unresolved, as prior studies of fossil webs have been limited by low-resolution, high-uncertainty data. We compiled highly resolved, well-documented feeding interaction data for 700 taxa from the 48 million-year-old latest early Eocene Messel Shale, which contains a species assemblage that developed after an interval of protracted environmental and biotal change during and following the end-Cretaceous extinction....

Registration Year

  • 2014
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Santa Fe Institute
    4
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    1
  • Universitat Politècnica de València
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • Smithsonian Institution
    1
  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    1
  • University of Zurich
    1
  • Centre for Genomic Regulation
    1
  • Barcelona Biomedical Research Park
    1