4 Works

Data from: Satellite telemetry reveals higher fishing mortality rates than previously estimated, suggesting overfishing of an apex marine predator

Michael E. Byrne, Enric Cortés, Jeremy J. Vaudo, Guy C. McN. Harvey, Mark Sampson, Bradley M. Wetherbee & Mahmood Shivji
Overfishing is a primary cause of population declines for many shark species of conservation concern. However, means of obtaining information on fishery interactions and mortality, necessary for the development of successful conservation strategies, are often fisheries-dependent and of questionable quality for many species of commercially exploited pelagic sharks. We used satellite telemetry as a fisheries-independent tool to document fisheries interactions, and quantify fishing mortality of the highly migratory shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) in the...

Data from: Additive negative effects of anthropogenic sedimentation and warming on the survival of coral recruits

Francesca Fourney & Joana Figueiredo
Corals worldwide are facing population declines due to global climate change and local anthropogenic impacts. Global climate change effects are hard to tackle but recent studies show that some coral species can better handle climate change stress when provided with additional energy resources. The local stressor that most undermines energy acquisition is sedimentation because it impedes coral heterotrophic feeding and their ability to photosynthesize. To investigate if reducing local sedimentation will enable corals to better...

Data from: Biogeophysical and physiological processes drive movement patterns in a marine predator

Lucy A. Howey
Background: Blue sharks (Prionace glauca) are among the most abundant and widely distributed of oceanic elasmobranchs. Millions are taken annually in pelagic longline fisheries and comprise the highest component of auctioned fin weight in the international shark fin trade. Though studies of blue sharks outnumber those of other large pelagic sharks, the species’ complicated and sexually segregated life history still confound current understanding of Atlantic movement patterns. Lack of detailed information regarding movement and vertical...

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Southeastern University
    4
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    2
  • National Oceanography Centre
    1
  • University of Newcastle Australia
    1
  • Spanish Institute of Oceanography
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • Cape Eleuthera Institute
    1
  • Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority
    1
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    1
  • University of Rhode Island
    1