38 Works

Additional file 1 of Knowledge, attitude and perceptions of medical students towards mental health in a university in Uganda

Raymond Bernard Kihumuro, Mark Mohan Kaggwa, Timothy Mwanje Kintu, Rachael Mukisa Nakandi, David Richard Muwanga, David Jolly Muganzi, Pius Atwau, Innocent Ayesiga, Josephine Nambi Najjuma & Scholastic Ashaba
Supplementary Material 1

Additional file 3 of Knowledge, attitude and perceptions of medical students towards mental health in a university in Uganda

Raymond Bernard Kihumuro, Mark Mohan Kaggwa, Timothy Mwanje Kintu, Rachael Mukisa Nakandi, David Richard Muwanga, David Jolly Muganzi, Pius Atwau, Innocent Ayesiga, Josephine Nambi Najjuma & Scholastic Ashaba
Supplementary Material 3

Additional file 1 of Intensified tuberculosis treatment to reduce the mortality of HIV-infected and uninfected patients with tuberculosis meningitis (INTENSE-TBM): study protocol for a phase III randomized controlled trial

Thomas Maitre, Maryline Bonnet, Alexandra Calmy, Mihaja Raberahona, Rivonirina Andry Rakotoarivelo, Niaina Rakotosamimanana, Juan Ambrosioni, José M. Miró, Pierre Debeaudrap, Conrad Muzoora, Angharad Davis, Graeme Meintjes, Sean Wasserman, Robert Wilkinson, Serge Eholié, Frédéric Ello Nogbou, Maria-Camilla Calvo-Cortes, Corine Chazallon, Vanessa Machault, Xavier Anglaret & Fabrice Bonnet
Additional file 1. Modified MARAIS Score (modified from Marais et al. [27]).

Antimicrobial resistance and rational use of medicine: knowledge, perceptions, and training of clinical health professions students in Uganda

Andrew Marvin Kanyike, Ronald Olum, Jonathan Kajjimu, Shebah Owembabazi, Daniel Ojilong, Dianah Rhoda Nassozi, Joan Fidelia Amongin, Linda Atulinda, Kenneth Agaba, Drake Agira, Nicholas Kisaakye Wamala, Richard Buule, Germinah Nabukeera, Robert Kyomuhendo, Rehema Luwano, Whitney Owobusingye, Dissan Matovu, Philip Musoke, Felix Bongomin & Kenedy Kiyimba
Abstract Background Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an important global health concern, projected to contribute to significant mortality, particularly in developing countries. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, perceptions of clinical health professions students towards antimicrobial resistance and rational use of medicine and confidence level to prescribe antimicrobials. Methods An online descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among clinical health professions students across 9 medical schools in Uganda. A semi-structured questionnaire using Kobo Toolbox form was...

Demand-Side Factors in Maternal Health Outcomes: Evidence from a Community Health Worker Programme in Uganda

Joshua L. Greenberg, Jordan Bateisibwa, Joseph Ngonzi & Katherine Donato
While community health workers (CHWs) are a core feature of many low-resource healthcare systems, evidence on both their health impacts and the mechanisms behind these impacts remains limited. Using a difference-in-differences design with a control and treatment group, this study evaluated a CHW programme in southwestern Uganda aimed at improving maternal health outcomes. We found relatively little evidence of an overall programme effect on health behaviours, including antenatal care attendance and delivery under skilled supervision....

Perspectives on mental health services for medical students at a Ugandan medical school

Raymond Bernard Kihumuro, Mark Mohan Kaggwa, Rachael Mukisa Nakandi, Timothy Mwanje Kintu, David Richard Muwanga, David Jolly Muganzi, Pius Atwau, Innocent Ayesiga, Anita Acai, Sarah Maria Najjuka, Josephine Nambi Najjuma, Susan Frazier-Koussai, Scholastic Ashaba & Sheila Harms
Abstract Background University-based mental health services for medical students remain a challenge, particularly in low-income countries, due to poor service availability. Prior studies have explored the availability of mental health services in high-income countries but little is known about mental health services in countries in sub-Saharan Africa, such as Uganda. Medical students are at a higher risk of developing mental health challenges during their course of study as compared with other students. Thus, there is...

Level and comfort of caregiver–young adolescent communication on sexual and reproductive health: a cross-sectional survey in south-western Uganda

Cecilia Akatukwasa, Viola N. Nyakato, Dorcus Achen, Elizabeth Kemigisha, Daniel Atwine, Wendo Mlahagwa, Stella Neema, Gad Ndaruhutse Ruzaaza, Gily Coene, Godfrey Z. Rukundo & Kristien Michielsen
Abstract Background Communication on sexual and reproductive health (SRH) between caregivers and their young adolescent children plays a significant role in shaping attitudes and behaviours that are critical to laying the foundations for positive and safe SRH behaviours in later adolescence. Nevertheless, this communication is often limited, particularly in countries where adolescent sexuality is taboo. This study assessed the topics discussed (‘level’) and the comfort of caregivers with communicating with young adolescents on SRH, and...

Intensified tuberculosis treatment to reduce the mortality of HIV-infected and uninfected patients with tuberculosis meningitis (INTENSE-TBM): study protocol for a phase III randomized controlled trial

Thomas Maitre, Maryline Bonnet, Alexandra Calmy, Mihaja Raberahona, Rivonirina Andry Rakotoarivelo, Niaina Rakotosamimanana, Juan Ambrosioni, José M. Miró, Pierre Debeaudrap, Conrad Muzoora, Angharad Davis, Graeme Meintjes, Sean Wasserman, Robert Wilkinson, Serge Eholié, Frédéric Ello Nogbou, Maria-Camilla Calvo-Cortes, Corine Chazallon, Vanessa Machault, Xavier Anglaret & Fabrice Bonnet
Abstract Background Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most lethal and disabling form of tuberculosis (TB), particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Current anti-TB treatment is poorly effective since TBM mortality reaches 40% in HIV-negative patients and up to 70% in HIV-co-infected patients. To reduce TBM-induced morbidity and mortality, the INTENSE-TBM trial evaluates two interventions in both HIV-infected and uninfected patients: an anti-TB treatment intensification using oral high-dose rifampicin (35 mg/kg daily) and linezolid (1200 mg daily and...

Additional file 1 of Intensified tuberculosis treatment to reduce the mortality of HIV-infected and uninfected patients with tuberculosis meningitis (INTENSE-TBM): study protocol for a phase III randomized controlled trial

Thomas Maitre, Maryline Bonnet, Alexandra Calmy, Mihaja Raberahona, Rivonirina Andry Rakotoarivelo, Niaina Rakotosamimanana, Juan Ambrosioni, José M. Miró, Pierre Debeaudrap, Conrad Muzoora, Angharad Davis, Graeme Meintjes, Sean Wasserman, Robert Wilkinson, Serge Eholié, Frédéric Ello Nogbou, Maria-Camilla Calvo-Cortes, Corine Chazallon, Vanessa Machault, Xavier Anglaret & Fabrice Bonnet
Additional file 1. Modified MARAIS Score (modified from Marais et al. [27]).

Intensified tuberculosis treatment to reduce the mortality of HIV-infected and uninfected patients with tuberculosis meningitis (INTENSE-TBM): study protocol for a phase III randomized controlled trial

Thomas Maitre, Maryline Bonnet, Alexandra Calmy, Mihaja Raberahona, Rivonirina Andry Rakotoarivelo, Niaina Rakotosamimanana, Juan Ambrosioni, José M. Miró, Pierre Debeaudrap, Conrad Muzoora, Angharad Davis, Graeme Meintjes, Sean Wasserman, Robert Wilkinson, Serge Eholié, Frédéric Ello Nogbou, Maria-Camilla Calvo-Cortes, Corine Chazallon, Vanessa Machault, Xavier Anglaret & Fabrice Bonnet
Abstract Background Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most lethal and disabling form of tuberculosis (TB), particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Current anti-TB treatment is poorly effective since TBM mortality reaches 40% in HIV-negative patients and up to 70% in HIV-co-infected patients. To reduce TBM-induced morbidity and mortality, the INTENSE-TBM trial evaluates two interventions in both HIV-infected and uninfected patients: an anti-TB treatment intensification using oral high-dose rifampicin (35 mg/kg daily) and linezolid (1200 mg daily and...

Supplemental Material - Antiretroviral therapy adherence patterns, virological suppression, and emergence of drug resistance: A nested case–control study from Uganda and South Africa

Anisha Tyagi, Yao Tong, Dustin J Rabideau, Zahra Reynolds, Tulio De Oliveira, Richard Lessells, Gideon Amanyire, Catherine Orrell, Stephen Asiimwe, Benjamin Chimukangara, Jennifer Giandhari, Sureshnee Pillay, Jessica E Haberer & Mark J Siedner
Supplemental Material for Antiretroviral therapy adherence patterns, virological suppression, and emergence of drug resistance: A nested case–control study from Uganda and South Africa by Anisha Tyagi, Yao Tong, Dustin J Rabideau, Zahra Reynolds, Tulio De Oliveira, Richard Lessells, Gideon Amanyire, Catherine Orrell, Stephen Asiimwe, Benjamin Chimukangara, Jennifer Giandhari, Sureshnee Pillay, Jessica E Haberer, and Mark J Siedner on behalf of the META Study Investigators in Antiviral Therapy

Antiretroviral therapy adherence patterns, virological suppression, and emergence of drug resistance: A nested case–control study from Uganda and South Africa

Anisha Tyagi, Yao Tong, Dustin J Rabideau, Zahra Reynolds, Tulio De Oliveira, Richard Lessells, Gideon Amanyire, Catherine Orrell, Stephen Asiimwe, Benjamin Chimukangara, Jennifer Giandhari, Sureshnee Pillay, Jessica E Haberer & Mark J Siedner
BackgroundRelationships between distinct antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence patterns and risk of drug resistance are not well understood.MethodsWe conducted a nested case–control analysis within a longitudinal cohort study of individuals initiating efavirenz-based ART. Primary outcomes of interest, measured at 6 and 12 months after treatment initiation, were: 1) virologic suppression, 2) virologic failure with resistance, and 3) virologic failure without resistance. Our primary exposure of interest was ART adherence, measured over the 6 months before each...

Additional file 1 of Perspectives on mental health services for medical students at a Ugandan medical school

Raymond Bernard Kihumuro, Mark Mohan Kaggwa, Rachael Mukisa Nakandi, Timothy Mwanje Kintu, David Richard Muwanga, David Jolly Muganzi, Pius Atwau, Innocent Ayesiga, Anita Acai, Sarah Maria Najjuka, Josephine Nambi Najjuma, Susan Frazier-Koussai, Scholastic Ashaba & Sheila Harms
Additional file 1.

Additional file 1 of Knowledge, attitude and perceptions of medical students towards mental health in a university in Uganda

Raymond Bernard Kihumuro, Mark Mohan Kaggwa, Timothy Mwanje Kintu, Rachael Mukisa Nakandi, David Richard Muwanga, David Jolly Muganzi, Pius Atwau, Innocent Ayesiga, Josephine Nambi Najjuma & Scholastic Ashaba
Supplementary Material 1

Additional file 1 of Level and comfort of caregiver–young adolescent communication on sexual and reproductive health: a cross-sectional survey in south-western Uganda

Cecilia Akatukwasa, Viola N. Nyakato, Dorcus Achen, Elizabeth Kemigisha, Daniel Atwine, Wendo Mlahagwa, Stella Neema, Gad Ndaruhutse Ruzaaza, Gily Coene, Godfrey Z. Rukundo & Kristien Michielsen
Additional file 1: Appendix A. Level of comfort of SRH communication. Appendix B. SRH communication by number of topics. Appendix C. Caregiver attitudes towards SRH of Adolescents. Appendix D. Comfort of SRH Discussions by dyad type. Appendix E. Distribution of independent variables by sex of the caregiver.

Effect of six- versus eight-month regimen on treatment success and smear conversion among retreatment patients

Jonathan Izudi, Lila Sheira, Francis Bajunirwe, Sandra McCoy & Adithya Cattamanchi
Background: In 2017, the regimen for patients with retreatment tuberculosis (TB) changed from an eight-month treatment regimen that consisted of Isoniazid, Rifampicin, Pyrazinamide, Ethambutol, and Streptomycin (2RHZES/1RHZE/5RHE) to a six-month treatment regimen (2RHZE/4RH). Currently, there is uncertainty regarding the effect of the six-month treatment regimen on treatment outcomes across TB Control Programs. We evaluated the effect of the six-month treatment regimen on treatment success rate (TSR) and sputum smear conversion (SSC) among patients with retreatment...

Data from: Occupancy winners in tropical protected forests: a pantropical analysis

Asunción Semper-Pascual, Richard Bischof, Cyril Milleret, Lydia Beaudrot, Andrea F. Vallejo-Vargas, Jorge A. Ahumada, Emmanuel Akampurira, Robert Bitariho, Santiago Espinosa, Patrick A. Jansen, Cisquet Kiebou-Opepa, Marcela Guimarães Moreira Lima, Emanuel H. Martin, Badru Mugerwa, Francesco Rovero, Julia Salvado, Fernanda Santos, Eustrate Uzabaho & Douglas Sheil
The structure of forest mammal communities appears surprisingly consistent across the continental tropics, presumably due to convergent evolution in similar environments. Whether such consistency extends to mammal occupancy, despite variation in species characteristics and context, remains unclear. Here we ask whether we can predict occupancy patterns and, if so, whether these relationships are consistent across biogeographic regions. Specifically, we assessed how mammal feeding guild, body mass and ecological specialization relate to occupancy in protected forests...

Additional file 2 of Knowledge, attitude and perceptions of medical students towards mental health in a university in Uganda

Raymond Bernard Kihumuro, Mark Mohan Kaggwa, Timothy Mwanje Kintu, Rachael Mukisa Nakandi, David Richard Muwanga, David Jolly Muganzi, Pius Atwau, Innocent Ayesiga, Josephine Nambi Najjuma & Scholastic Ashaba
Supplementary Material 2

Additional file 3 of Knowledge, attitude and perceptions of medical students towards mental health in a university in Uganda

Raymond Bernard Kihumuro, Mark Mohan Kaggwa, Timothy Mwanje Kintu, Rachael Mukisa Nakandi, David Richard Muwanga, David Jolly Muganzi, Pius Atwau, Innocent Ayesiga, Josephine Nambi Najjuma & Scholastic Ashaba
Supplementary Material 3

Knowledge, attitude and perceptions of medical students towards mental health in a university in Uganda

Raymond Bernard Kihumuro, Mark Mohan Kaggwa, Timothy Mwanje Kintu, Rachael Mukisa Nakandi, David Richard Muwanga, David Jolly Muganzi, Pius Atwau, Innocent Ayesiga, Josephine Nambi Najjuma & Scholastic Ashaba
Abstract Background The prevalence of mental illness among medical students is high. A gap remains on what knowledge should be given to improve the attitudes and perceptions towards mental health. Despite the vast body of literature globally, no study has been conducted in Uganda to assess the levels of knowledge, attitude, and perception among medical students in Uganda. Objective To determine the level of knowledge, attitude, and perception and their associated factors among medical students...

Level and comfort of caregiver–young adolescent communication on sexual and reproductive health: a cross-sectional survey in south-western Uganda

Cecilia Akatukwasa, Viola N. Nyakato, Dorcus Achen, Elizabeth Kemigisha, Daniel Atwine, Wendo Mlahagwa, Stella Neema, Gad Ndaruhutse Ruzaaza, Gily Coene, Godfrey Z. Rukundo & Kristien Michielsen
Abstract Background Communication on sexual and reproductive health (SRH) between caregivers and their young adolescent children plays a significant role in shaping attitudes and behaviours that are critical to laying the foundations for positive and safe SRH behaviours in later adolescence. Nevertheless, this communication is often limited, particularly in countries where adolescent sexuality is taboo. This study assessed the topics discussed (‘level’) and the comfort of caregivers with communicating with young adolescents on SRH, and...

Additional file 1 of Level and comfort of caregiver–young adolescent communication on sexual and reproductive health: a cross-sectional survey in south-western Uganda

Cecilia Akatukwasa, Viola N. Nyakato, Dorcus Achen, Elizabeth Kemigisha, Daniel Atwine, Wendo Mlahagwa, Stella Neema, Gad Ndaruhutse Ruzaaza, Gily Coene, Godfrey Z. Rukundo & Kristien Michielsen
Additional file 1: Appendix A. Level of comfort of SRH communication. Appendix B. SRH communication by number of topics. Appendix C. Caregiver attitudes towards SRH of Adolescents. Appendix D. Comfort of SRH Discussions by dyad type. Appendix E. Distribution of independent variables by sex of the caregiver.

Additional file 2 of Perspectives on mental health services for medical students at a Ugandan medical school

Raymond Bernard Kihumuro, Mark Mohan Kaggwa, Rachael Mukisa Nakandi, Timothy Mwanje Kintu, David Richard Muwanga, David Jolly Muganzi, Pius Atwau, Innocent Ayesiga, Anita Acai, Sarah Maria Najjuka, Josephine Nambi Najjuma, Susan Frazier-Koussai, Scholastic Ashaba & Sheila Harms
Additional file 2.

Additional file 1 of Antimicrobial resistance and rational use of medicine: knowledge, perceptions, and training of clinical health professions students in Uganda

Andrew Marvin Kanyike, Ronald Olum, Jonathan Kajjimu, Shebah Owembabazi, Daniel Ojilong, Dianah Rhoda Nassozi, Joan Fidelia Amongin, Linda Atulinda, Kenneth Agaba, Drake Agira, Nicholas Kisaakye Wamala, Richard Buule, Germinah Nabukeera, Robert Kyomuhendo, Rehema Luwano, Whitney Owobusingye, Dissan Matovu, Philip Musoke, Felix Bongomin & Kenedy Kiyimba
Additional file1. Study Questionnaire.

Asynchronous Saturation of the Carbon Sink in African and Amazonian tropical forests

Wannes Hubau, Simon Lewis, Oliver Phillips, Kofi Kofi Affum-Baffoe, Hans Hans Beeckman, Aida Cuni-Sanchez, Corneille Ewango, Sophie Fauset, Douglas Sheil, Bonaventure Sonké, Martin Sullivan, Terry Sunderland, Sean Thomas, Katharine Abernethy, Stephen Adu-Bredu, Christian Amani, Timothy Baker, Lindsay Banin, Fidèle Baya, Serge Begne, Amy Bennett, Fabrice Benedet, Robert Bitariho & Yannick Bocko
Data and R-code from Hubau W et al. 2020. 'Asynchronous Saturation of the Carbon Sink in African and Amazonian tropical forests'. Nature 579, 80-87. 2020. DOI: 10.1038/s41586-020-2035-0. ABSTRACT: Structurally intact tropical forests sequestered ~50% of global terrestrial carbon uptake over the 1990s and early 2000s, offsetting ~15% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions1-3. Climate-driven vegetation models typically predict that this tropical forest ‘carbon sink’ will continue for decades4,5. However, recent inventories of intact Amazonian forests show declining...

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