8 Works

Data from: Host-jump drives rapid and recent ecological speciation of the emergent fungal pathogen Colletotrichum kahawae

Diogo N. Silva, Pedro Talhinhas, Cai Lei, Luzolo Manuel, Elijah K. Gichuru, Andreia Loureiro, Vítor Várzea, Octavio S. Paulo & Dora Batista
Ecological speciation through host-shift has been proposed as a major route for the appearance of novel fungal pathogens. The growing awareness of their negative impact on global economies and public health created an enormous interest in identifying the factors that are most likely to promote their emergence in nature. In this work, a combination of pathological, molecular and geographic data was used to investigate the recent emergence of the fungus Colletotrichum kahawae (Ck). Ck emerged...

Data from: Origin of the chromosomal radiation of Madeiran house mice: a microsatellite analysis of metacentric chromosomes

Maria Da Luz Mathias, Janice Britton-Davidian, Jeremy B. Searle & Daniel W. Förster
Chromosome races of Mus musculus domesticus are characterised by particular sets of metacentric chromosomes formed by Robertsonian fusions and whole-arm reciprocal translocations. The Atlantic island of Madeira is inhabited by six chromosome races of house mice with 6–9 pairs of metacentric chromosomes. Three of these races are characterised by the metacentric 3.8 also found elsewhere in the distribution of M. m. domesticus, including Denmark and Spain. We investigated the possibility that metacentric 3.8 was introduced...

Data from: Influences of past climatic changes on historical population structure and demography of a cosmopolitan marine predator, the common dolphin (genus Delphinus)

Ana Amaral, Luciano Beheregaray, Kerstin Bilgmann, Luís Freitas, Kelly Robertson, Marina Sequeira, Karen Stockin, M. M. Coelho & Luciana Möller
Climatic oscillations during the Pleistocene have greatly influenced the distribution and connectivity of many organisms, leading to extinctions but also generating biodiversity. While the effects of such changes have been extensively studied in the terrestrial environment, studies focusing on the marine realm are still scarce. Here we used sequence data from one mitochondrial and five nuclear loci to assess the potential influence of Pleistocene climatic changes on the phylogeography and demographic history of a cosmopolitan...

Data from: Deep mitochondrial introgression and hybridization among ecologically divergent vole species

Cristiane Bastos-Silveira, Sara M. Santos, Rita Monarca, Maria Da Luz Mathias & Gerald Heckel
The completion of speciation is typically difficult to ascertain in rapidly diverging taxa but the amount of hybridization and gene flow in sympatry or parapatry contains important information about the level of reproductive isolation achieved. Here we examined the progress in speciation between the Mediterranean (Microtus duodecimcostatus) and the Lusitanian pine vole (M. lusitanicus) which are part of the most rapid radiation of species known in mammals. These two Iberian pine voles are classified as...

Data from: From nature to the labratory: the impact of founder effects in adaptation

Josiane Santos, Marta Pascual, Pedro Simões, Inês Fragata, Margarida Lima, Bárbara Kellen, Marta Santos, Ana Marques, Michael R. Rose & Margarida Matos
Most founding events entail a reduction of population size, which in turn leads to genetic drift effects that can deplete alleles. Besides reducing neutral genetic variability, founder effects can in principle shift additive genetic variance for phenotypes that underlie fitness. This could then lead to different rates of adaptation among populations that have undergone a population size bottleneck as well as an environmental change, even when these populations have a common evolutionary history. Thus theory...

Data from: Species tree of a recent radiation: the subfamily Delphininae (Cetacea, Mammalia)

Ana R. Amaral, Jennifer A. Jackson, Luciana M. Moller, Luciano B. Beheregaray & M. Manuela Coelho
Lineages undergoing rapid radiations provide exceptional opportunities for studying speciation and adaptation, but also represent a challenge for molecular systematics because retention of ancestral polymorphisms and the occurrence of hybridization can obscure relationships among lineages. Dolphins in the subfamily Delphininae are one such case. Non-monophyly, rapid speciation events, and discordance between morphological and molecular characters have made the inference of phylogenetic relationships within this subfamily very difficult. Here we approach this problem by applying multiple...

Data from: Genetic footprints of Iberian cattle in America 500 years after the arrival of Columbus

Amparo M. Martínez, Luis T. Gama, Javier Cañón, Catarina Ginja, Juan V. Delgado, Susana Dunner, Vincenzo Landi, Inmaculada Martín-Burriel, M. Cecilia T. Penedo, Clementina Rodellar, Jose Luis Vega-Pla, Atzel Acosta, Luz Ángela Álvarez, Esperanza Camacho, Óscar Cortés, José Ribamar Marques, Óscar Roberto Martínez, Rubén Darío Martínez, Lilia Melucci, Guillermo Martínez-Velázquez, Jose Ernesto Muñoz, Alicia Postiglioni, Jorge Quiroz, Philip Sponenberg, Odalys Uffo … & Ruben D. Martínez
BACKGROUND: American Creole cattle presumably descend from animals imported from the Iberian Peninsula during the period of colonization and settlement, through different migration routes, and may have also suffered the influence of cattle directly imported from Africa. The introduction of European cattle, which began in the 18th century, and later of Zebu from India, has threatened the survival of Creole populations, some of which have nearly disappeared or were admixed with exotic breeds. Assessment of...

Data from: Phylogeography, genetic structure and population divergence time of cheetahs in Africa and Asia: evidence for long-term geographic isolates

Pauline Charruau, Carlos Fernandes, Pablo Orozco-TerWengel, Joris Peters, Luke Hunter, H. Ziaie, A. Jourabchian, H. Jowkar, Georges Schaller, Stephane Ostrowski, Paul Vercammen, Thierry Grange, Christian Schlötterer, Antoinette Kotze, Eva-Maria Geigl, Chris Walzer & Pamela A. Burger
The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been described as a species with low levels of genetic variation. This has been suggested to be the consequence of a demographic bottleneck 10 000–12 000 years ago (ya) and also led to the assumption that only small genetic differences exist between the described subspecies. However, analysing mitochondrial DNA and microsatellites in cheetah samples from most of the historic range of the species we found relatively deep phylogeographic breaks between...

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