17 Works

Data from: Unraveling conflicting density- and distance-dependent effects on plant reproduction using a spatially-explicit approach

José M. Fedriani, Thorsten Wiegand, Gemma Calvo, Alberto Suárez-Esteban, Miguel Jácome, Magdalena Żywiec & Miguel Delibes
1. Density- and distance-dependent (DDD) mechanisms are important determinants of plant reproductive success (PRS). Different components of sequential PRS can operate either in the same or in different directions and thus reinforce or neutralize each other, and they may also operate at different spatial scales. Thus, spatially-explicit approaches are needed to detect such complex DDD effects across multiple PRS components and spatial scales. 2. To reveal DDD effects of different components of early PRS of...

Data from: Mapping beta diversity from space: Sparse Generalized Dissimilarity Modelling (SGDM) for analysing high-dimensional data

Pedro J. Leitão, Stefan Suess, Marcel Schwieder, Inês Catry, Edward Milton, Francisco Moreira, Patrick E. Osborne, Manuel J. Pinto, Sebastian Van Der Linden, Patrick Hostert & Edward J. Milton
1. Spatial patterns of community composition turnover (beta diversity) may be mapped through Generalised Dissimilarity Modelling (GDM). While remote sensing data are adequate to describe these patterns, the often high-dimensional nature of these data poses some analytical challenges, potentially resulting in loss of generality. This may hinder the use of such data for mapping and monitoring beta-diversity patterns. 2. This study presents Sparse Generalised Dissimilarity Modelling (SGDM), a methodological framework designed to improve the use...

Data from: P53 gene discriminates two ecologically divergent sister species of pine voles

Ana S. Quina, Cristiane Bastos-Silveira, Marcos Miñarro, Jacint Ventura, Rafael Jiménez, Octávio S. Paulo & Maria L. Mathias
Genes with relevant roles in the differentiation of closely-related species are likely to have diverged simultaneously with the species and more accurately reproduce the species tree. The Lusitanian (Microtus lusitanicus) and Mediterranean (M. duodecimcostatus) pine voles are two recently separated sister species with fossorial lifestyles whose different ecological, physiological and morphological phenotypes reflect the better adaptation of M. duodecimcostatus to the underground habitat. Here we asked whether the differentiation of M. lusitanicus and M. duodecimcostatus...

Data from: \"De novo assembled transcriptome of organs involved in reproduction in an endangered endemic Iberian cyprinid fish (Squalius pyrenaicus)\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 June 2015 to 31 July 2015

Miguel P. Machado, Joana Pinho, Ana R. Grosso, Manfred Schartl, Maria M. Coelho, C. Vilas, Wolfgang Arthofer, Alexander Rief, Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner, Julia Seeber, Florian M. Steiner, D. Conklin, A. Estonba, J. Langa & I. Montes
Sex determination systems are diverse, especially among fish, and include genetic and/or environmental components. Unexpectedly for such a basic aspect of development, sex determination systems change rapidly during evolution and gonadal fate is not ultimate, being actively maintained lifelong. Here, sequences of expressed genes involved in maintenance of gonad identity and reproduction processes were obtained through transcriptome assembly of the brain-gonadal axis tissues of a freshwater fish inhabiting highly variable environments, the gonochoristic Iberian fish...

Data from: Evolution of Drosophila resistance against different pathogens and infection routes entails no detectable maintenance costs

Vitor G. Faria, Nelson E. Martins, Tânia Paulo, Luís Teixeira, Élio Sucena & Sara Magalhães
Pathogens exert a strong selective pressure on hosts, entailing host adaptation to infection. This adaptation often affects negatively other fitness-related traits. Such trade-offs may underlie the maintenance of genetic diversity for pathogen resistance. Trade-offs can be tested with experimental evolution of host populations adapting to parasites, using two approaches: (1) measuring changes in immunocompetence in relaxed-selection lines and (2) comparing life-history traits of evolved and control lines in pathogen-free environments. Here, we used both approaches...

Data from: \"Discovery and characterization of 80 SNPs and 1,624 SSRs in the transcriptome of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus, L)\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 June 2015 to 31 July 2015

Iratxe Montes, Jorge Langa, César Vilas, Sarah J. Helyar, Paula Álvarez, Darrell Conklin & Andone Estonba
This paper reports on SNP discovery in the Atlantic mackerel transcriptome, using next generation sequencing technologies and applying developed methodology already proven successful for the European anchovy. A total of 9,966 high quality transcriptome contigs were assembled, from which 951 putative SNPs were discovered. In all, 479 putative SNPs and 1,624 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) suitable for genotyping were identified. A subset of 96 was selected for genotyping; from these, 80 SNPs were considered polymorphic...

Data from: Drosophila melanogaster larvae make nutritional choices that minimize developmental time

Marisa A. Rodrigues, Nelson E. Martins, Lara F. Balancé, Lara N. Broom, António J. S. Dias, Ana S. D. Fernandes, Fábio Rodrigues, Élio Sucena & Christen K. Mirth
Organisms from slime moulds to humans carefully regulate their macronutrient intake to optimize a wide range of life history characters including survival, stress resistance, and reproductive success. However, life history characters often differ in their response to nutrition, forcing organisms to make foraging decisions while balancing the trade-offs between these effects. To date, we have a limited understanding of how the nutritional environment shapes the relationship between life history characters and foraging decisions. To gain...

Data from: Keeping your options open: maintenance of thermal plasticity during adaptation to a stable environment

Inês Fragata, Miguel Lopes-Cunha, Margarida Bárbaro, Bárbara Kellen, Margarida Lima, Gonçalo Faria, Sofia G. Seabra, Mauro Santos, Pedro Simões & Margarida Maria Matos
Phenotypic plasticity may allow species to cope with environmental variation. The study of thermal plasticity and its evolution helps understanding how populations respond to variation in temperature. In the context of climate change, it is essential to realize the impact of historical differences in the ability of populations to exhibit a plastic response to thermal variation and how it evolves during colonization of new environments. We have analyzed the real-time evolution of thermal reaction norms...

Data from: Intracoronary delivery of human mesenchymal/stromal stem cells: insights from coronary microcirculation invasive assessment in a swine model

António Fiarresga, Márcia F. Mata, Sandra Cavaco-Gonçalves, Mafalda Selas, Irina N. Simões, Eunice Oliveira, Belmira Carrapiço, Nuno Cardim, Joaquim M. Sampaio Cabral, Rui Cruz Ferreira & Cláudia Lobato Da Silva
Background: Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells have unique properties favorable to their use in clinical practice and have been studied for cardiac repair. However, these cells are larger than coronary microvessels and there is controversy about the risk of embolization and microinfarctions, which could jeopardize the safety and efficacy of intracoronary route for their delivery. The index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) is an invasive method for quantitatively assessing the coronary microcirculation status. Objectives: To examine heart microcirculation...

Data from: Understanding the mechanisms of anti-tropical divergence in the seabird White-faced Storm-petrel (Procellariiformes: Pelagodroma marina) using a multi-locus approach

Monica C. Silva, Rafael Matias, Ross M. Wanless, Peter G. Ryan, Brent Stephenson, Mark Bolton, Nuno Ferrand & M. Manuela Coelho
Analytical methods that apply coalescent theory to multilocus data have improved inferences of demographic parameters that are critical to understanding population divergence and speciation. In particular, at the early stages of speciation, it is important to implement models that accommodate conflicting gene trees, and benefit from the presence of shared polymorphisms. Here, we employ eleven nuclear loci and the mitochondrial control region to investigate the phylogeography and historical demography of the pelagic seabird White-faced Storm-petrel...

Data from: How a haemosporidian parasite of bats gets around: the genetic structure of a parasite, vector and host compared

Fardo Witsenburg, Laura Clément, Ludovic Dutoit, Adrià López-Baucells, Jorge Palmeirim, Dino Scaravelli, Martin Ševčík, Nicolas Salamin, Jérôme Goudet, Philippe Christe & Igor Pavlinić
Parasite population structure is often thought to be largely shaped by that of its host. In the case of a parasite with a complex life cycle, two host species, each with their own patterns of demography and migration, spread the parasite. However, the population structure of the parasite is predicted to resemble only that of the most vagile host species. In this study we tested this prediction in the context of a vector-transmitted parasite. We...

Data from: Avian malaria: a new lease of life for an old experimental model to study the evolutionary ecology of Plasmodium

Romain Pigeault, Julien Vézilier, Stéphane Cornet, Flore Zélé, Antoine Nicot, Philippe Perret, Sylvain Gandon & Ana Rivero
Avian malaria has historically played an important role as a model in the study of human malaria, being a stimulus for the development of medical parasitology. Avian malaria has recently come back to the research scene as a unique animal model to understand the ecology and evolution of the disease, both in the field and in the laboratory. Avian malaria is highly prevalent in birds and mosquitoes around the world and is amenable to laboratory...

Data from: Wing trait-inversion associations in Drosophila subobscura can be generalized within continents, but may change through time

Pedro Simoes, Inês Fragata, Miguel Lopes-Cunha, Margarida Lima, Bárbara Kellen, Margarida Bárbaro, Mauro Santos & Margarida Matos
Clinal variation is one of the most emblematic examples of the action of natural selection at a wide geographical range. In Drosophila subobscura parallel clines in body size and inversions, but not in wing shape, were found in Europe and South and North America. Previous work has shown that a bottleneck effect might be largely responsible for differences in wing trait-inversions association between one European and one South American population. One question still unaddressed is...

Data from: Structure and functioning of intertidal food webs along an avian flyway: a comparative approach using stable isotopes

Teresa Catry, Pedro M. Lourenço, Ricardo J. Lopes, Camilo Carneiro, José A. Alves, Joana Costa, Hamid Rguibi-Idrissi, Stuart Bearhop, Theunis Piersma & José P. Granadeiro
Food webs and trophic dynamics of coastal systems have been the focus of intense research throughout the world, as they prove to be critical in understanding ecosystem processes and functions. However, very few studies have undertaken a quantitative comparison of entire food webs from a key consumer perspective across a broad geographical area, limiting relevant comparisons among systems with distinct biotic and abiotic components. We investigate the structure and functioning of food webs in four...

Data from: Detection of tephra layers in Antarctic sediment cores with hyperspectral imaging

Ismael F. Aymerich, Marc Oliva, Santiago Giralt & Julio Martín-Herrero
Tephrochronology uses recognizable volcanic ash layers (from airborne pyroclastic deposits, or tephras) in geological strata to set unique time references for paleoenvironmental events across wide geographic areas. This involves the detection of tephra layers which sometimes are not evident to the naked eye, including the so-called cryptotephras. Tests that are expensive, time-consuming, and/or destructive are often required. Destructive testing for tephra layers of cores from difficult regions, such as Antarctica, which are useful sources of...

Data from: Evolution of mating behaviour between two populations adapting to common environmental conditions

Margarida Bárbaro, Mário S. Mira, Inês Fragata, Pedro Simões, Margarida Lima, Miguel Lopes-Cunha, Bárbara Kellen, Josiane Santos, Susana A. M. Varela, Margarida Matos & Sara Magalhães
Populations from the same species may be differentiated across contrasting environments, potentially affecting reproductive isolation among them. When such populations meet in a novel common environment, this isolation may be modified by biotic or abiotic factors. Curiously, the latter have been overlooked. We filled this gap by performing experimental evolution of three replicates of two populations of Drosophila subobscura adapting to a common laboratorial environment, and simulated encounters at three time points during this process....

Data from: Semi-permeable species boundaries in Iberian barbels (Barbus and Luciobarbus, Cyprinidae)

Hugo F. Gante, Ignacio Doadrio, Maria Judite Alves & Thomas E. Dowling
Background: The evolution of species boundaries and the relative impact of selection and gene flow on genomic divergence are best studied in populations and species pairs exhibiting various levels of divergence along the speciation continuum. We studied species boundaries in Iberian barbels, Barbus and Luciobarbus, a system of populations and species spanning a wide degree of genetic relatedness, as well as geographic distribution and range overlap. We jointly analyze multiple types of molecular markers and...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • University of Lisbon
    17
  • University of the Basque Country
    2
  • University of Würzburg
    2
  • Andalusian Institute of Agricultural and Fisheries Research and Training
    2
  • University of Exeter
    2
  • University of Porto
    2
  • University of Innsbruck
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1