12 Works

Data from: Evidence for low-level hybridization between two allochronic populations of the pine processionary moth, Thaumetopoea pityocampa (Lepidoptera: Notodontidae)

Christian Burban, Mathieu Gautier, Raphael Leblois, Julie Landes, Helena Santos, Maria-Rosa Païva, Manuela Branco & Carole Kerdelhué
Divergence between populations sharing the same habitat can be initiated by different reproductive times, leading to allochronic differentiation. A spatially localized allochronic summer population (SP) of the pine processionary moth Thaumetopoea pityocampa, recently discovered in Portugal, occurs in sympatry with the local winter population (WP). We examined the level of genetic differentiation between the two populations and estimated the current gene flow within the spatial framework of their co-occurrence. Mitochondrial data indicated that the two...

Data from: Tracking global change using lichen diversity: towards a global-scale ecological indicator

Paula Matos, Linda Geiser, Amanda Hardman, Doug Glavich, Pedro Pinho, Alice Nunes, Amadeu M. V. M. Soares, Cristina Branquinho & Amadeu M.V.M. Soares
Lichens have been used to efficiently track major drivers of global change from the local to regional scale since the beginning of the industrial revolution (sulphur dioxide) to the present (nitrogen deposition and climate change). Currently, the challenge is to universalize monitoring methodologies to compare global change drivers’ simultaneous and independent effects on ecosystems and to assess the efficacy of mitigation measures. Because two protocols are now used at a continental scale North America (US)...

Data from: Conservation priorities of Iberoamerican pig breeds and their ancestors based on microsatellite information

Oscar Cortés, A. M. Martinez, J. Cañon, N. Sevane, L. T. Gama, C. Ginja, V. Landi, P. Zaragoza, N. Carolino, A. Vicente, P. Sponenberg & J. V. Delgado
Criollo pig breeds are descendants from pigs brought to the American continent starting with Columbus second trip in 1493. Pigs currently play a key role in social economy and community cultural identity in Latin America. The aim of this study was to establish conservation priorities among a comprehensive group of Criollo pig breeds based on a set of 24 microsatellite markers and using different criteria. Spain and Portugal pig breeds, wild boar populations of different...

Data from: History, geography, and host use shape genome-wide patterns of genetic variation in the redheaded pine sawfly (Neodiprion lecontei)

Robin K. Bagley, Vitor C. Sousa, Matthew L. Niemiller & Catherine R. Linnen
Divergent host use has long been suspected to drive population differentiation and speciation in plant-feeding insects. Evaluating the contribution of divergent host use to genetic differentiation can be difficult, however, as dispersal limitation and population structure may also influence patterns of genetic variation. In this study, we use double-digest restriction-associated DNA (ddRAD) sequencing to test the hypothesis that divergent host use contributes to genetic differentiation among populations of the redheaded pine sawfly (Neodiprion lecontei), a...

Data from: Revisiting the measurement of anomie

Ali Teymoori, Jolanda Jetten, Brock Bastian, Amarina Ariyanto, Frédérique Autin, Nadia Ayub, Constantina Badea, Tomasz Besta, Fabrizio Butera, Rui Costa-Lopes, Lijuan Cui, Carole Fantini, Gillian Finchilesc, Lowell Gaertner, Mario Gollwitzer, Ángel Gómez, Roberto González, Ying Yi Hong, Dorthe Høj Jensen, Minoru Karasawa, Thomas Kessler, Olivier Klein, Marcus Lima, Tuuli Anna Mähönen, Laura Megevand … & Gillian Finchilescu
Sociologists coined the term "anomie" to describe societies that are characterized by disintegration and deregulation. Extending beyond conceptualizations of anomie that conflate the measurements of anomie as 'a state of society' and as a 'state of mind', we disentangle these conceptualizations and develop an analysis and measure of this phenomenon focusing on anomie as a perception of the 'state of society'. We propose that anomie encompasses two dimensions: a perceived breakdown in social fabric (i.e.,...

Data from: Mechanisms and fitness consequences of laying decisions in a migratory raptor

Teresa Catry, Francisco Moreira, Rita Alcazar, Pedro A. Rocha & Ines Catry
Seasonal decline in breeding performance is a commonly observed pattern in birds, but disentangling the contributions of environmental conditions (“timing” hypothesis) and individual quality (“quality” hypothesis) to such a pattern is challenging. Moreover, despite the strong selection for early breeding, the individual optimization model predicts that each individual has an optimal breeding window. We investigated the causes and consequences of laying decisions in the lesser kestrel (Falco naumanni) by combining a long-term dataset on reproductive...

Data from: Extended dispersal kernels in a changing world: insights from statistics of extremes

Cristina Garcia & Luís Borda-De-Água
Dispersal ecology is a topical discipline that involves understanding and predicting plant community responses to multiple drivers of global change. Propagule movements that entail long-distance dispersal (LDD) events are crucial for plants to reach and colonize suitable sites across fragmented landscapes. Yet, LDD events are extremely rare, and thus, obtaining reliable estimates of the maximum distances that propagules move across and of their frequency has been a long-lasting challenge in plant ecology. Recent advances in...

Data from: Spatial patterns of self-recruitment of a coral reef fish in relation to island-scale retention mechanisms

Ricardo Beldade, Sally J. Holbrook, Russell J. Schmitt, Serge Planes & Giacomo Bernardi
Oceanographic features influence the transport and delivery of marine larvae, and physical retention mechanisms, such as eddies, can enhance self-recruitment (i.e. the return of larvae to their natal population). Knowledge of exact locations of hatching (origin) and settlement (arrival) of larvae of reef animals provides a means to compare observed patterns of self-recruitment ‘connectivity’ with those expected from water circulation patterns. Using parentage inference based on multiple sampling years in Moorea, French Polynesia, we describe...

Data from: Dispersal and group formation dynamics in a rare and endangered temperate forest bat (Nyctalus lasiopterus, Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae)

João D. Santos & Christoph F. J. Meyer
For elusive mammals like bats, colonization of new areas and colony formation are poorly understood, as is their relationship with the genetic structure of populations. Understanding dispersal and group formation behaviors is critical not only for a better comprehension of mammalian social dynamics, but also for guiding conservation efforts of rare and endangered species. Using nuclear and mitochondrial markers, we studied patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation among and within breeding colonies of giant noctule...

Data from: Climate modifies response of non-native and native species richness to nutrient enrichment

Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Peter B. Reich, Eric M. Lind, Lauren L. Sullivan, Eric W. Seabloom, Laura Yahdjian, Andrew S. MacDougall, Lara G. Reichmann, Juan Alberti, Selene Báez, Jonathan D. Bakker, Marc W. Cadotte, Maria C. Caldeira, Enrique J. Chaneton, Carla M. D'Antonio, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Oscar Iribarne, Kevin P. Kirkman, Johannes M. H. Knops, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Ramesh Laungani, Andrew D. B. Leakey … & Elizabeth T. Borer
Ecosystem eutrophication often increases domination by non-natives and causes displacement of native taxa. However, variation in environmental conditions may affect the outcome of interactions between native and non-native taxa in environments where nutrient supply is elevated. We examined the interactive effects of eutrophication, climate variability and climate average conditions on the success of native and non-native plant species using experimental nutrient manipulations replicated at 32 grassland sites on four continents. We hypothesized that effects of...

Data from: Influence of plant-pollinator interactions on the assembly of plant and hummingbird communities

Marina Wolowski, Luísa G. Carvalheiro & Leandro Freitas
Understanding how ecological processes structure species assemblages is a central issue in community ecology. While the influence of plant–pollinator interactions on each other's evolution is well recognized, their role in the assembly of interdependent communities of plants and pollinators is still unclear. Using data from seven communities of hummingbirds and plants that they pollinate from two tropical rain forest types (lowland and montane), we evaluated phylogenetic relationships and signal of functional traits, over space and...

Data from: \"Transcriptome sequences for Campanula gentilis\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 April 2015 – 31 May 2015

Töre Demet, Federico Luebert, Guilhem Mansion, Ludo A. H. Muller, M. Vidotto, E. Boscari, L. Congiu, A. Grapputo, L. Zane, Vera Maria Fonseca Almeida-Val, Maria Manuela Coelho, Tiago Filipe Jesus & Demet Töre
In this report, we present the transcriptome of a single accession of Campanula gentilis Kovanda, obtained through the sequencing of both a normalized and a non-normalized cDNA library generated from stem and leaf tissue. The resources we provide include the raw sequence reads, the assembled contigs, the putative open reading frames, the contig/ORF annotations and the normalized as well as non-normalized expression levels.

Registration Year

  • 2016
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • University of Lisbon
    12
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • University of Kentucky
    2
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • University of Padua
    1
  • University of Buenos Aires
    1
  • National University of Malaysia
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • University of Aveiro
    1