19 Works

Data from: Tropical specialist versus climate generalist: diversification and demographic history of sister species of Carlia skinks from northwestern Australia

Ana Catarina Afonso Silva, Jason G. Bragg, Sally Potter, Carlos Fernandes, Maria Manuela Coelho & Craig Moritz
Species endemic to the tropical regions are expected to be vulnerable to future climate change due in part to their relatively narrow climatic niches. In addition, these species are more likely to have responded strongly to past climatic change, and this can be explored through phylogeographic analyses. To test the hypothesis that tropical specialists are more sensitive to climate change than climate generalists, we generated and analyze sequence data from mtDNA and ~2500 exons to...

Data from: The population genomics of archaeological transition in west Iberia: investigation of ancient substructure using imputation and haplotype-based methods

Rui Martiniano, Lara M. Cassidy, Ros Ó'Maoldúin, Russell McLaughlin, Nuno M. Silva, Licinio Manco, Daniel Fidalgo, Tania Pereira, Maria J. Coelho, Miguel Serra, Joachim Burger, Rui Parreira, Elena Moran, Antonio C. Valera, Eduardo Porfirio, Rui Boaventura, Ana M. Silva & Daniel G. Bradley
We analyse new genomic data (0.05–2.95x) from 14 ancient individuals from Portugal distributed from the Middle Neolithic (4200–3500 BC) to the Middle Bronze Age (1740–1430 BC) and impute genomewide diploid genotypes in these together with published ancient Eurasians. While discontinuity is evident in the transition to agriculture across the region, sensitive haplotype-based analyses suggest a significant degree of local hunter-gatherer contribution to later Iberian Neolithic populations. A more subtle genetic influx is also apparent in...

Data from: Climate and anthropogenic factors determine site occupancy in Scotland's Northern-range badger population: implications of context-dependent responses under environmental change

André P. Silva, Gonçalo Curveira-Santos, Kerry Kilshaw, Chris Newman, David W. Macdonald, Luciana G. Simões & Luís M. Rosalino
Aim In the light of human-induced rapid environmental change (HIREC), populations are exposed to ever-greater bioclimatic stress at the edge of a species’ historic range. The distribution dynamics of European badgers (Meles meles) at their southern edge are linked tightly to climatic variability. We contribute critical data on how climatic context and local factors determine site occupancy in a northern-range population. Location Eleven study areas (averaging ~21.3 km2) spread over ~50,000 km2 in Northern Scotland....

Data from: Functional anatomy of the cervical region in the late Miocene amphicyonid Magericyon anceps (Carnivora, Amphicyonidae): implications for its feeding behaviour

Gema Siliceo, Manuel J. Salesa, Mauricio Antón, Stéphane Peigné & Jorge Morales
We describe the skull and neck morphology of the late Miocene amphicyonid Magericyon anceps, focusing on aspects related to functional anatomy. This species, recorded only from the Vallesian sites of Batallones-1 and Batallones-3 (Madrid, Spain), is the last known amphicyonid in the fossil record of Western Europe, with the Batallones populations being one of the best-known of the family. The morphology of its skull and cervical vertebrae allows us to infer aspects of its associated...

Data from: Sauropod tooth morphotypes from the Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin (Portugal)

Pedro Mocho, Rafael Royo-Torres, Elisabete Malafaia, Fernando Escaso & Francisco Ortega
The Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin has yielded an important fossil record of sauropods, but little information is available about the tooth morphotypes represented in this region. A large sample of teeth, both unpublished and published, is described and discussed here. Four main tooth morphologies are identified: spatulate, heart-shaped, pencil-shaped, and compressed cone-chisel-shaped. Heart-shaped teeth are considered to be exclusive to a non-neosauropod eusauropod, tentatively referred to Turiasauria. The spatulate teeth can be attributed...

Data from: Quantifying population size of migrant birds at stopover sites: combining count data with stopover length estimated from stable isotope analysis

Teresa Catry, Pedro Miguel Lourenço & Jose Pedro Granadeiro
1. Regular counts of migrating animals at stopover sites have been used as a measure of site importance at the global scale as well as for monitoring long-term population changes. However, migratory passage can last for several weeks and the turnover rate of individuals is often high, preventing the use of peak counts to estimate the total number of migrants. This estimate can be achieved, however, by combining count data with information on stopover length....

Data from: DNA metabarcoding for high-throughput monitoring of estuarine macrobenthic communities

Jorge Lobo, Shadi Shokralla, Maria Helena Costa, Mehrdad Hajibabaei & Filipe Costa
Morphology-based profiling of benthic communities has been extensively applied to aquatic ecosystems' health assessment. However, it remains a low-throughput, and sometimes ambiguous, procedure. Despite DNA metabarcoding has been applied to marine benthos, a comprehensive approach providing species-level identifications for estuarine macrobenthos is still lacking. Here we report a combination of experimental and field studies to assess the aptitude of COI metabarcoding to provide robust species-level identifications for high-throughput monitoring of estuarine macrobenthos. To investigate the...

Data from: Riparian plant guilds become simpler and most likely fewer following flow regulation

María D. Bejarano, Christer Nilsson & Francisca C. Aguiar
1. River regulation affects riparian systems worldwide and conservation and restoration efforts are essential to retain biodiversity, and the functioning and services of riverine ecosystems. Effects of regulation on plant species richness have been widely addressed, but the filtering effect of regulation on guilds has received less attention. 2. We used a functional trait approach to identify adaptive plant strategies through regulation-tolerant traits and predict shifts of riparian vegetation communities in response to regulation. We...

Data from: Anthropogenic disturbance of tropical forests threatens pollination services to açaí palm in the Amazon river delta

Alistair John Campbell, Luísa Gigante Carvalheiro, Marcia Motta Maués, Rodolfo Jaffé, Tereza Cristina Giannini, Madson Antonio Benjamin Freitas, Beatriz Woiski Texeira Coelho & Cristiano Menezes
The açaí palm Euterpe oleracea Mart. in the Amazon river delta has seen rapid expansion to meet increased demand for its fruit. This has been achieved by transforming lowland forest habitats (floodplains) into simplified agroforests and intensive plantation in upland areas. As açaí palm makes an important contribution to the economy and food security of local communities, identifying management approaches that support biodiversity and ecosystem processes that underpin fruit production on açaí farms is essential....

Data from: Using beta diversity to inform agricultural policies and conservation actions on Mediterranean farmland

Joana Santana, Miguel Porto, Luis Reino, Francisco Moreira, Paulo Flores Ribeiro, José Lima Santo, John T. Rotenberry & Pedro Beja
1. Spatial variation in species composition (β-diversity) is an important component of farmland biodiversity, which together with local richness (α-diversity) drives the number of species in a region (γ-diversity). However, β-diversity is seldom used to inform conservation, due to limited understanding of its responses to agricultural management, and lack of clear links between β-diversity changes and conservation outcomes. 2. We explored the value of β-diversity to guide conservation on farmland, by quantifying the contribution of...

Data from: Genome-wide SNP data unveils the globalization of domesticated pigs

Bin Yang, Leilei Cui, Miguel Perez-Enciso, Aleksei Traspov, Richard P. M. A. Crooijmans, Natalia Zinovieva, Lawrence B. Schook, Alan Archibald, Kesinee Gatphayak, Christophe Knorr, Alex Triantafyllidis, Panoraia Alexandri, Gono Semiadi, Olivier Hanotte, Deodália Dias, Peter Dovč, Pekka Uimari, Laura Iacolina, Massimo Scandura, Martien A. M. Groenen, Lusheng Huang & Hendrik-Jan Megens
Background: Pigs were domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia early during the agricultural revolution, and have since been transported and traded across the globe. Here, we present a worldwide survey on 60K genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for 2093 pigs, including 1839 domestic pigs representing 122 local and commercial breeds, 215 wild boars, and 39 out-group suids, from Asia, Europe, America, Oceania and Africa. The aim of this study was to infer global...

Data from: Rare events of massive plant reproductive investment lead to long-term density-dependent reproductive success

Magdalena Żywiec, Mateusz Ledwoń, Jan Holeksa, Piotr Seget, Barbara Łopata & Jose M. Fedriani
1. The level of reproductive investment and density and distance dependent (DDD) processes are major determinants of plant reproductive output. The reproductive investment of a plant population varies temporally, but whether and how density- and distance-dependent processes are affected by population-level reproductive investment is a puzzle. 2. We used a spatially explicit approach in order to examine DDD effects on Sorbus acuparia crop sizes for a continuous period of 16 years. Our special interest was...

Data from: Long term on-farm participatory maize breeding by stratified mass selection retains molecular diversity while improving agronomic performance

Mara Lisa Alves, Maria Belo, Bruna Carbas, Cláudia Brites, Manuel Paulo, Pedro Mendes-Moreira, Carla Brites, Maria Do Rosário Bronze, Zlatko Šatović & Maria Carlota Vaz Patto
Modern maize breeding programs gave rise to genetically uniform varieties that can affect maize's capacity to cope with increasing climate unpredictability. Maize populations, genetically more heterogeneous, can evolve and better adapt to a broader range of edaphic-climatic conditions. These populations usually suffer from low yields; it is therefore desirable to improve their agronomic performance while maintaining their valuable diversity levels. With this objective, a long-term participatory breeding/on-farm conservation program was established in Portugal. In this...

Data from: The diet of a nocturnal pelagic predator, the Bulwer’s petrel, across the lunar cycle

S. Waap, W. O. C. Symondson, J. P. Granadeiro, H. Alonso, C. Serra-Gonçalves, M. P. Dias & P. Catry
The lunar cycle is believed to strongly influence the vertical distribution of many oceanic taxa, with implications for the foraging behaviour of nocturnal marine predators. Most studies to date testing lunar effects on foraging have focused on predator activity at-sea, with some birds and marine mammals demonstrating contrasting behavioural patterns, depending on the lunar-phase. However, to date no study has focused on how the lunar cycle might actually affect predator-prey interactions in the upper layers...

Data from: Tracking changes in chromosomal arrangements and their genetic content during adaptation

Josiane Santos, Marta Pascual, Inês Fragata, Pedro Simões, Marta A. Santos, Margarida Lima, Ana Marques, Miguel Lopes-Cunha, Bárbara Kellen, Joan Balanyà, Michael R. Rose & Margarida Matos
There is considerable evidence for an adaptive role of inversions, but how their genetic content evolves and affects the subsequent evolution of chromosomal polymorphism remains controversial. Here, we track how life-history traits, chromosomal arrangements and 22 microsatellites, within and outside inversions, change in three replicated populations of Drosophila subobscura for 30 generations of laboratory evolution since founding from the wild. The dynamics of fitness-related traits indicated adaptation to the new environment concomitant with directional evolution...

Data from: Evolutionary online behaviour learning and adaptation in real robots

Fernando Silva, Luís Correia & Anders L. Christensen
Online evolution of behavioural control on real robots is an open-ended approach to autonomous learning and adaptation: robots have the potential to automatically learn new tasks and to adapt to changes in environmental conditions, or to failures in sensors and/or actuators. However, studies have so far almost exclusively been carried out in simulation because evolution in real hardware has required several days or weeks to produce capable robots. In this article, we successfully evolve neural...

Data from: Despite reproductive interference, the net outcome of reproductive interactions among spider mite species is not necessarily costly

Salomé H. Clemente, Inês Santos, Rita Ponce, Leonor R. Rodrigues, Susana A.M. Varela & Sara Magalhaes
Reproductive interference is considered a strong ecological force, potentially leading to species exclusion. This supposes that the net effect of reproductive interactions is strongly negative for one, or both, of the species involved. Testing this requires a comprehensive analysis of interspecific reproductive interactions, accounting for the order and timing of mating events, and for their effects on either fertility or fecundity. To this aim, we measured reproductive interactions among spider mites, using a focal species,...

Data from: Does sex matter? Gender-specific responses to forest fragmentation in Neotropical bats

Ricardo Rocha, Diogo F. Ferreira, Adrià López-Baucells, Fabio Z. Farneda, Joao M.B. Carreiras, Jorge M. Palmeirim & Christoph F. J. Meyer
Understanding the consequences of habitat modification on wildlife communities is central to the development of conservation strategies. However, albeit male and female individuals of numerous species are known to exhibit differences in habitat use, sex-specific responses to habitat modification remain little explored. Here, we used a landscape-scale fragmentation experiment to assess, separately for males and females, the effects of fragmentation on the abundance of Carollia perspicillata and Rhinophylla pumilio, two widespread Neotropical frugivorous bats. We...

Data from: Mauritius on fire: tracking historical human impacts on biodiversity loss

William D. Gosling, Jona De Kruif, Sietze J. Norder, Erik J. De Boer, Henry Hooghiemstra, Kenneth F. Rijsdijk, Crystal N.H. McMichael & Crystal N. H. McMichael
Fire was rare on Mauritius prior to human arrival (AD 1598); subsequently three phases of elevated fire activity occurred: c. 1630-1747, 1787-1833, and 1950-modern. Elevated fire frequency coincided with periods of high human impact evidenced from the historical record, and is linked to the extinction of island endemics.

Registration Year

  • 2017
    19

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    19

Affiliations

  • University of Lisbon
    19
  • University of Helsinki
    2
  • Federal Scientific Center for Animal Husbandry named after Academician L.K. Ernst
    1
  • University of Zagreb
    1
  • University of Aveiro
    1
  • Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    1
  • Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi
    1
  • University of Agriculture in Krakow
    1
  • Lisbon University Institute
    1
  • University of Algarve
    1