16 Works

Data from: Carcharodontosaurian remains (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal

Elisabete Malafaia, Pedro Mocho, Fernando Escaso, Pedro Dantas & Francisco Ortega
A new specimen of a theropod dinosaur found in the Upper Jurassic (Freixial Formation, late Tithonian) of the Lusitanian Basin is described. It corresponds to a single individual and includes a sequence of articulated caudal vertebrae, an almost complete right pes, and other fragments of the appendicular skeleton. The specimen includes the most complete pes of a theropod dinosaur currently known in the Lusitanian Basin and represents one of the youngest skeletal records of theropod...

Data from: Quantifying in situ phenotypic variability in the hydraulic properties of four tree species across their distribution range in Europe

Sylvain Delzon, N. González-Muñoz, J. M. Torres-Ruiz, G. Capdeville, F. Sterck, P. Copini, G. Petit, G. Von Arx, A. Lintunen, L. Grönlund, T. Hölttä, M. C. Caldeira, R. Lobo-Do-Vale & M. Peltoniemi
Many studies have reported that hydraulic properties vary considerably between tree species, but little is known about their intraspecific variation and, therefore, their capacity to adapt to a warmer and drier climate. Here, we quantify phenotypic divergence and clinal variation for embolism resistance, hydraulic conductivity and branch growth, in four tree species, two angiosperms (Betula pendula, Populus tremula) and two conifers (Picea abies, Pinus sylvestris), across their latitudinal distribution in Europe. Growth and hydraulic efficiency...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: Effect of cadmium accumulation on the performance of plants and of herbivores that cope differently with organic defenses

Diogo Prino Godinho, Helena Cristina Serrano, Anabela B. Da Silva, Cristina Branquinho & Sara Magalhães
Some plants are able to accumulate in their shoots metals at levels that are toxic to most other organisms. This ability may serve as a defence against herbivores. Therefore, both metal-based and organic defences may affect herbivores. However, how metal accumulation affects the interaction between herbivores and organic plant defences remains overlooked. To fill this gap, we studied the interactions between tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), a model plant that accumulates cadmium, and two spidermite species, Tetranychus...

Data from: Microsites of seed arrival: spatio-temporal variations in complex seed-disperser networks

Ana I. García-Cervigón, Magdalena Zywiec, Miguel Delibes, Alberto Suárez-Esteban, Ramon Perea & Jose M. Fedriani
Microsites where seeds arrive during the dispersal process determine plant reproductive success, affecting the quality of dispersal. Despite their crucial role for plant recruitment, very few studies have addressed spatio-temporal variations in microsites of seed arrival in complex seed-disperser networks. Using an endozoochorous dispersal system, we characterized the microsites of seed arrival of eight fleshy-fruited plant species dispersed by five mammal species during two consecutive seasons across three sites in a Mediterranean environment (n =...

Data from: Contrasting plant water-use responses to groundwater depth in coastal dune ecosystems

Cristina Antunes, Mari Cruz Díaz Barradas, María Zunzunegui, Simone Vieira, Ângela Pereira, Andreia Anjos, Otília Correia, Maria João Pereira & Cristina Máguas
1.Groundwater lowering can produce dramatic changes in the physiological performance and survival of plant species. The impact of decreasing water availability due to climate change and anthropogenic groundwater extraction on coastal dune ecosystems has become of increasing concern, with uncertainties about how vegetation will respond in both the short and long terms. 2.We aimed to evaluate the water‐use responses of different plant functional types to increasing groundwater table depth and how this would affect their...

Data from: The abundance and distribution of guilds of riparian woody plants change in response to land use and flow regulation

Francisca C. Aguiar, Pedro Segurado, Maria João Martins, Maria Dolores Bejarano, Christer Nilsson, Maria Manuela Portela & David M. Merritt
1. Many riparian ecosystems in Mediterranean Europe are affected by land use and flow alteration by dams. We focused on understanding how these stressors and their components affect riparian forests in the region. We asked: (i) are there well-defined, responsive riparian guilds?; (ii) do dam-induced stream flows determine abundance and distribution of riparian guilds? and (iii) what are the main drivers governing composition and cover of riparian guilds in regulated rivers? 2. We inventoried the...

Data from: Mate choice driven by genome in an allopolyploid fish complex

Miguel Morgado-Santos, Maria Filomena Magalhães, Luís Vicente & Maria João Collares-Pereira
Nonsexual complexes which lack typical reproductive isolation and show multiple conspecific and heterospecific mating options among hybrids and parental species are excellent models to study mate choice based on genetics. The allopolyploid fish complex Squalius alburnoides includes multiple fertile male and female genomotypes reproducing among each other and with the sympatric species of the Squalius genus. We used this hybridogenetic complex to study the relationship between mate preference and mates’ genetic background, focusing on a...

Data from: Traits that allow bats of tropical lowland origin to conquer mountains: bat assemblages along elevational gradients in the South American Atlantic Forest

William Douglas De Carvalho, Mayara A. Martins, Carlos Eduardo L. Esbérard & Jorge M. Palmeirim
Aim: This study aims to contribute to the identification of ecological determinants of tropical moist forest montane biodiversity, analyzing changes in the structure of bat assemblages along an elevational gradient and testing the role of species traits shaping those assemblages. Location: Mountain ranges in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Methods: We compiled a dataset with the composition of phyllostomid bat assemblages at 32 forested sites, ranging from 60m to 1960m a.s.l. We quantified how abundance and...

Data from: Bee movement across heterogeneous tropical forests: multi-paternal genetic analyses reveal the importance of neighborhood composition for pollen-mediated gene flow

Megan C. O'Connell, Antonio R. Castilla, Leticia X. Lee & Shalene Jha
Animal pollination is critical for maintaining the reproduction and genetic diversity of many plant species, especially those in tropical ecosystems. Despite the threat to pollination posed by tropical deforestation, it remains an understudied process. In particular, little is known about these dynamics in multi-paternal, successional plant species whose fruits can contain substantial genetic diversity. Given the importance of successional plants in reforestation, quantifying the factors that impact their reproduction is essential for understanding plant gene...

Data from: Evolution of longevity improves immunity in Drosophila

Daniel K. Fabian, Kathrin Garschall, Peter Klepsatel, Gonçalo Santos-Matos, Élio Sucena, Martin Kapun, Bruno Lemaitre, Robert Arking, Christian Schloetterer & Thomas Flatt
Much has been learned about the genetics of aging from studies in model organisms, but still little is known about naturally occurring alleles that contribute to variation in longevity. For example, analysis of mutants and transgenes has identified insulin signaling as a major regulator of longevity, yet whether standing variation in this pathway underlies microevolutionary changes in lifespan and correlated fitness traits remains largely unclear. Here we have analyzed the genomes of a set of...

Data from: How much starvation, desiccation and oxygen depletion can Drosophila melanogaster tolerate before its upper thermal limits are affected?

Tommaso Manenti, Tomás Rocha Cunha, Jesper Givskov Sørensen & Volker Loeschcke
Heat tolerance is commonly assessed as the critical thermal maximum (CTmax) using the dynamic method exposing organisms to a gradually increasing (ramping) temperature until organisms fall into a coma. The CTmax estimate is dependent on the ramping rate, with decreased rates leading to longer treatments and ultimately lower CTmax estimates. There is a current discussion surrounding the physiological dynamics of the effect of the time of exposure by temperature interaction on these estimates. Besides temperature...

Data from: Natural history and survival in stage 1 Val30Met transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy

Teresa Coelho, Mónica Inês, Isabel Conceiçao, Marta Soares, Mamede De Carvalho & João Costa
Objectives: To assess natural history and treatment effect on survival among transthyretin-associated familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) Val30Met patients. Methods: Multi-institutional, hospital-based study of TTR-FAP Val30Met patients prospectively followed-up until December 2016, grouped into untreated (n = 1,771), liver transplant (LTx) (n = 957) or tafamidis-treated (n = 432) cohorts. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR), Kaplan-Meier and Cox methods were used to estimate excess mortality, survival probabilities and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause mortality, respectively. Results:...

Data from: Leaf nutrients, not specific leaf area, are consistent indicators of elevated nutrient inputs

Jennifer Firn, James M. McGree, Eric Harvey, Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Martin Schütz, Yvonne M. Buckley, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Andrew M. MacDougall, Suzanne M. Prober, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren L. Sullivan, Erica Porter, Emma Ladouceur, Charlotte Allen, Karine H. Moromizato, John W. Morgan, W. Stanley Harpole, Yann Hautier, Nico Eisenhauer, Justin P. Wright, Peter B. Adler, Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker … & Anita C. Risch
Leaf traits are frequently measured in ecology to provide a ‘common currency’ for predicting how anthropogenic pressures impact ecosystem function. Here, we test whether leaf traits consistently respond to experimental treatments across 27 globally distributed grassland sites across 4 continents. We find that specific leaf area (leaf area per unit mass)—a commonly measured morphological trait inferring shifts between plant growth strategies—did not respond to up to four years of soil nutrient additions. Leaf nitrogen, phosphorus...

Data from: An expanded molecular phylogeny of Plumbaginaceae, with emphasis on Limonium (sea lavenders): taxonomic implications and biogeographic considerations

Konstantina Koutroumpa, Spyros Theodoridis, Ben H. Warren, Ares Jiménez, Ferhat Celep, Musa Doğan, Maria M. Romeiras, Arnoldo Santos-Guerra, José María Fernández-Palacios, Juli Caujapé-Castells, Mónica Moura, Miguel M. Sequeira, Elena Conti & Miguel Menezes De Sequeira
Plumbaginaceae is characterized by a history of multiple taxonomic rearrangements and lacks a broad molecular phylogenetic framework. Limonium is the most species‐rich genus of the family with ca. 600 species and cosmopolitan distribution. Its center of diversity is the Mediterranean region, where ca. 70% of all Limonium species are endemic. In this study, we sample 201 Limonium species covering all described infrageneric entities and spanning its wide geographic range, along with 64 species of other...

Data from: Drivers of power line use by white storks: a case study of birds nesting on anthropogenic structures

Francisco Moreira, Ricardo C. Martins, Ines Catry & Marcello D'Amico
1. Anthropogenic structures are mainly known to have negative impacts on wildlife populations but sometimes arethey can be beneficial. Power lines are a main driver of bird mortality through collision or electrocution, but electricity pylons are also commonly used for nest building by some species. Birds and nests cause power outages that need to be tackled by electricity companies. However, the use of pylons by threatened species provides an opportunity for conservation purposes. 2. In...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    16

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    16

Affiliations

  • University of Lisbon
    16
  • University of Alberta
    2
  • University of Guelph
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Padua
    1
  • Friends University
    1
  • University of Twente
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Biodiversity Research Institute
    1