3 Works

Data from: Resource partitioning facilitates coexistence in sympatric cetaceans in the California Current

Sabrina Fossette, Briana Abrahms, Elliott L. Hazen, Steven J. Bograd, Kelly M. Newton, John Calambokidis, Julia A. Burrows, Jeremy A. Goldbogen, James T. Harvey, Baldo Marinovic, Bernie Tershy, Donald A. Croll & Kelly M. Zilliacus
1. Resource partitioning is an important process driving habitat use and foraging strategies in sympatric species that potentially compete. Differences in foraging behavior are hypothesized to contribute to species coexistence by facilitating resource partitioning, but little is known on the multiple mechanisms for partitioning that may occur simultaneously. Studies are further limited in the marine environment, where the spatial and temporal distribution of resources is highly dynamic and subsequently difficult to quantify. 2. We investigated...

Data from: Protection of large predators in a marine reserve alters size-dependent prey mortality

Rebecca L. Selden, Steven D. Gaines, Scott L. Hamilton & Robert R. Warner
Where predator–prey interactions are size-dependent, reductions in predator size owing to fishing has the potential to disrupt the ecological role of top predators in marine ecosystems. In southern California kelp forests, we investigated the size-dependence of the interaction between herbivorous sea urchins and one of their predators, California sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher). Empirical tests examined how differences in predator size structure between reserve and fished areas affected size-specific urchin mortality. Sites inside marine reserves had greater...

Data from: Tsunami-driven rafting: transoceanic species dispersal and implications for marine biogeography

James T. Carlton, John W. Chapman, Jonathan B. Geller, Jessica A. Miller, Deborah A. Carlton, Megan I. McCuller, Nancy C. Treneman, Brian P. Steves & Gregory M. Ruiz
The 2011 East Japan earthquake generated a massive tsunami that launched an extraordinary transoceanic biological rafting event with no known historical precedent. We document 289 living Japanese coastal marine species from 16 phyla transported over 6 years on objects that traveled thousands of kilometers across the Pacific Ocean to the shores of North America and Hawai‘i. Most of this dispersal occurred on nonbiodegradable objects, resulting in the longest documented transoceanic survival and dispersal of coastal...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Moss Landing Marine Laboratories
    3
  • Newport (United States)
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    1
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    1
  • Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
    1
  • University of California, Santa Cruz
    1
  • Williams College
    1
  • Cascadia Research
    1