13 Works

Data from: Multispecies invasion reduces the negative impact of single alien plant species on native flora

Magdalena Lenda, Piotr Skórka, Johannes Knops, Michał Żmihorski, Renata Gaj, Dawid Moroń, Michal Woyciechowski & Piotr Tryjanowski
Aim: In the current Anthropocene, many ecosystems are being simultaneously invaded by multiple alien species. Some of these invasive species become more dominant and have greater environmental impacts than others. If two potentially dominant species invade the same area, the combined impact has been reported to be either (1) domination by one species, i.e., the competitive dominance of one invader, or (2) invasion meltdown, where the combined impact is much greater, i.e., a synergistic effect....

Data from: Implications of shared predation for space use in two sympatric leporids

Martijn J A Weterings, Sophie P Ewert, Jeffrey N Peereboom, Henry J Kuipers, Dries P J Kuijper, Herbert H T Prins, Patrick A Jansen, Frank Van Langevelde & Sipke E Van Wieren
Spatial variation in habitat riskiness has a major influence on the predator–prey space race. However, the outcome of this race can be modulated if prey shares enemies with fellow prey (i.e., another prey species). Sharing of natural enemies may result in apparent competition, and its implications for prey space use remain poorly studied. Our objective was to test how prey species spend time among habitats that differ in riskiness, and how shared predation modulates the...

Seasonal shifts of biodiversity patterns and species’ elevation ranges of butterflies and moths along a complete rainforest elevational gradient on Mount Cameroon

Vincent Maicher, Szabolcs Sáfián, Mercy Murkwe, Sylvain Delabye, Łukasz Przybyłowicz, Pavel Potocký, Ishmeal N. Kobe, Štěpán Janeček, Jan E. J. Mertens, Eric B. Fokam, Tomasz Pyrcz, Jiří Doležal, Jan Altman, David Hořák, Konrad Fiedler & Robert Tropek
Aim Temporal dynamics of biodiversity along tropical elevational gradients are unknown. We studied seasonal changes of Lepidoptera biodiversity along the only complete forest elevational gradient in the Afrotropics. We focused on shifts of species richness patterns, seasonal turnover of communities, and seasonal shifts of species’ elevational ranges, the latter often serving as an indicator of the global change effects on mountain ecosystems. Location Mount Cameroon, Cameroon. Taxon Butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) Methods We quantitatively sampled...

Comparing raccoon MHC diversity in native and introduced ranges: evidence for the importance of functional immune diversity for adaptation and survival in novel environments.

Aleksandra Biedrzycka, Maciej K. Konopiński, Eric Hoffman, Alexa Trujillo & Andrzej Zalewski
The adaptive potential of invasive species is related to the genetic diversity of the invader, which is influenced by genetic drift and natural selection. Typically, the genetic diversity of invaders is studied with neutral genetic markers, however, the expectation of reduced diversity has not been consistently supported by empirical studies. Here, we describe and interpret genetic diversity at both neutral microsatellite loci and the immune related MHC-DRB locus of native and invasive populations of raccoon...

The expansion wave of an invasive predator leaves declining waterbird populations behind

Marcin Brzeziński, Michał Żmihorski, Marek Nieoczym, Piotr Wilniewczyc & Andrzej Zalewski
Aim: Theory predicts that the evolutionary adaptations of prey to reduce predator pressure often fail in confrontation with non-native predators; thus, their predation usually leads to sharp declines of prey populations. However, over time, prey can develop anti-predator adaptations, reduce predator impact and recover its population. We analyse the numerical response of multiple prey species to the impact of a non-native predator on a large spatiotemporal scale. Location: Poland Methods: Long-term population dynamics of 13...

Data from: Fear of the dark? contrasting impacts of humans vs lynx on diel activity of roe deer across Europe

Nadège C. Bonnot, Ophélie Couriot, Anne Berger, Francesca Cagnacci, Simone Ciuti, Johannes De Groeve, Benedikt Gehr, Marco Heurich, Petter Kjellander, Max Kröschel, Nicolas Morellet, Leif Sönnichsen & A.J. Mark Hewison
Humans, as super predators, can have strong effects on wildlife behaviour, including profound modifications of diel activity patterns. Subsequent to the return of large carnivores to human-modified ecosystems, many prey species have adjusted their spatial behaviour to the contrasting landscapes of fear generated by both their natural predators and anthropogenic pressures. The effects of predation risk on temporal shifts in diel activity of prey, however, remain largely unexplored in human-dominated landscapes. We investigated the influence...

Data from: Small herbivores slow down species loss up to 22 years but only at early successional stage

Qingqing Chen, Ruth A. Howison, Jan P. Bakker, Juan Alberti, Dries P. J. Kuijper, Han Olff & Christian Smit
The long-term influence of persistent small herbivores on successional plant community configuration is rarely studied. We used an herbivore exclusion experiment along the successional gradient in a salt-marsh system, to investigate the effects of hares and geese, and hares alone, on plant diversity at five successional stages (the earliest, two early, the intermediate and the late successional stages) in the short and long term, i.e. 7 and 22 years, respectively. Plant diversity declined over time...

Data from: Megaphylogeny resolves global patterns of mushroom evolution

Torda Varga, Krisztina Krizsán, Csenge Földi, Bálint Dima, Marisol Sánchez-García, Santiago Sánchez-Ramírez, Gergely J. Szöllősi, János G. Szarkándi, Viktor Papp, László Albert, William Andreopoulos, Claudio Angelini, Vladimír Antonín, Kerrie W. Barry, Neale L. Bougher, Peter Buchanan, Bart Buyck, Viktória Bense, Pam Catcheside, Mansi Chovatia, Jerry Cooper, Wolfgang Dämon, Dennis Desjardin, Péter Finy, József Geml … & László G. Nagy
Mushroom-forming fungi (Agaricomycetes) have the greatest morphological diversity and complexity of any group of fungi. They have radiated into most niches and fulfill diverse roles in the ecosystem, including wood decomposers, pathogens or mycorrhizal mutualists. Despite the importance of mushroom-forming fungi, large-scale patterns of their evolutionary history are poorly known, in part due to the lack of a comprehensive and dated molecular phylogeny. Here, using multigene and genome-based data, we assemble a 5,284-species phylogenetic tree...

Data from: Bacterial communities within Phengaris (Maculinea) alcon caterpillars are shifted following transition from solitary living to social parasitism of Myrmica ant colonies

Mark A. Szenteczki, Camille Pitteloud, Luca Pietro Casacci, Lucie Kešnerová, Melissa R. L. Whitaker, Philipp Engel, Roger Vila & Nadir Alvarez
Bacterial symbionts are known to facilitate a wide range of physiological processes and ecological interactions for their hosts. In spite of this, caterpillars with highly diverse life histories appear to lack resident microbiota. Gut physiology, endogenous digestive enzymes, and limited social interactions may contribute to this pattern, but the consequences of shifts in social activity and diet on caterpillar microbiota are largely unknown. Phengaris alcon caterpillars undergo particularly dramatic social and dietary shifts when they...

Data from: Size-mediated priority and temperature effects on intra-cohort competition and cannibalism in a damselfly

Szymon Sniegula, Maria J. Golab & Frank Johansson
1. A shift in the relative arrival of offspring, e.g., a shift in hatching time, can affect competition at the intraspecific level through size-mediated priority effects, where the larger individuals gain more resources. These priority effects are likely to be affected by climate warming and the rate of intraspecific predation, i.e., cannibalism. 2. In a laboratory experiment, we examined size-mediated priority effects in larvae of the univoltine damselfly, Lestes sponsa, at two different temperatures (21°C...

Data from: Unveiling tipping points in long-term ecological records from Sphagnum-dominated peatlands

Mariusz Lamentowicz, Mariusz Gałka, Katarzyna Marcisz, Michał Słowiński, Kajukało-Drygalska Kajukało, Milva Druguet Dayras & Vincent E.J. Jassey
Unveiling past tipping points is a prerequisite for a better understanding of how individual species and entire ecosystems will respond to future climate change. Such knowledge is key for the implementation of biodiversity conservation. We identify the relationships between peatland vegetation and hydrological conditions over the past 2000 years using macrofossils, testate amoebae-based quantitative hydrological reconstructions, and Sphagnum-moss functional traits from seven Polish peatland records. Using threshold indicator taxa analysis (TITAN), we discovered that plant...

Data from: Soil organic carbon stability in forests: distinct effects of tree species identity and traits

Gerrit Angst, Kevin E. Mueller, David M. Eissenstat, Susan Trumbore, Katherine H. Freeman, Sarah E. Hobbie, Jon Chorover, Jacek Oleksyn, Peter B. Reich & Carsten W. Mueller
Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased interest in the potential for forest ecosystems and soils to act as carbon (C) sinks. While soil organic C contents often vary with tree species identity, little is known about if, and how, tree species influence the stability of C in soil. Using a 40‐year‐old common garden experiment with replicated plots of eleven temperate tree species, we investigated relationships between soil organic matter (SOM) stability in mineral soils and...

Reduced biodiversity in modernised villages: a conflict between sustainable development goals

Zuzanna M. Rosin, Matthew Hiron, Michał Żmihorski, Paweł Szymański, Marcin Tobolka & Tomas Pärt
1. Despite large conservation efforts to halt the loss of farmland biodiversity in Europe, negative population trends are still observed, especially for common species. Old villages and human settlements are biodiversity hotspots and important breeding habitats for farmland birds, but recent requirements for energy saving measures and improved living comfort have changed their architecture and habitats. Consequently, modernisation of villages may negatively affect bird diversity due to the loss of nesting and foraging sites. 2....

Registration Year

  • 2019
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • Polish Academy of Sciences
    13
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    2
  • Jagiellonian University
    2
  • Cleveland State University
    1
  • University of Buenos Aires
    1
  • Ghent University
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    1
  • University of Groningen
    1
  • Szent István University
    1