279 Works

Data for: Socially cued anticipatory adjustment of female signalling effort in a moth

Kathryn McNamara
Juvenile population density has profound effects on subsequent adult development, morphology, and reproductive investment. Yet, little is known about how the juvenile social environment affects adult investment into chemical sexual signalling. Male gumleaf skeletonizer moths, Uraba lugens, facultatively increase investment into antennae (pheromone receiving structures) when reared at low juvenile population densities, but whether there is comparable adjustment by females into pheromone investment is not known. We investigate how juvenile population density influences the ‘calling’...

Female and male plumage colour is linked to parental quality, pairing and extra-pair mating in a tropical passerine

Ana V. Leitão, Michelle L. Hall & Raoul A. Mulder
Sexual selection has been proposed to drive the evolution of elaborate phenotypic traits in males, which often confer success in competition or mating. However, in many species both males and females display such traits, although studies investigating selection acting in both sexes are scarce. In this study, we investigated whether plumage ornamentation is sexually selected in female and male lovely fairy-wrens Malurus amabilis, a cooperatively breeding songbird. We found that female and male plumage colour...

High contrast yellow mosaic patterns are prey attractants for orb-weaving spiders

Po Peng
Many animals improve their foraging success by producing signals that exploit the sensory biases of potential prey, but the specific properties that make these sensory traps effective remain unclear. We combine field experiments with phylogenetic comparative analyses to investigate the visual luring properties of different signal designs in web‐building spiders. Our field experiments used cardboard spider models to examine the effects of area of colour patches, colour and pattern on the foraging success of the...

Data from: Environment predicts repeated body size shifts in a recent radiation of Australian mammals

Emily J. Roycroft, Jonathan A. Nations & Kevin C. Rowe
Closely related species that occur across steep environmental gradients often display clear body size differences, and examining this pattern is crucial to understanding how environmental variation shapes diversity. Australian endemic rodents in the Pseudomys Division (Muridae: Murinae) have repeatedly colonized the arid, monsoon, and mesic biomes over the last 5 million years. Using occurrence records, body mass data, and Bayesian phylogenetic models we test whether body mass of 31 species in the Pseudomys Division can...

Flexible habitat choice by aphids exposed to multiple cues reflecting present and future benefits

Yin Wandong, Xue Qi, Tian Baoliang, Yang Shujian, Li Zhengying, Chen Zhaozhao, Ryan Michael & Hoffmann Ary
Mothers choose suitable habitats for laying offspring to maximize fitness. Since habitat quality varies in space and time, mothers gather information to choose among available habitats through multiple cues reflecting different aspects of habitat quality at present and in the future. However, it is unclear how females assess and integrate different cues associated with current rewards and future safety to optimize oviposition/larviposition decisions, especially across small spatial scales. Here we tested the individual and interactive...

Data from: From cryptic to colourful: evolutionary decoupling of larval and adult colour in butterflies

Iliana Medina, Regina Vega-Trejo, Thomas Wallenius, Matthew Symonds & Devi Stuart-Fox
Many animals undergo complete metamorphosis, where larval forms change abruptly in adulthood. Colour change during ontogeny is common, but there is little understanding of evolutionary patterns in these changes. Here we use data on larval and adult colour for 246 butterfly species (61% of all species in Australia) to test whether the evolution of colour is coupled between life stages. We show that adults are more variable in colour across species than caterpillars and that...

Data from: Broadband onset inhibition can suppress spectral splatter in the auditory brainstem

Martin J. Spencer, David A. X. Nayagam, Janine C. Clarey, Antonio G. Paolini, Hamish Meffin, Anthony N. Burkitt & David B. Grayden
In vivo intracellular responses to auditory stimuli revealed that, in a particular population of cells of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL) of rats, fast inhibition occurred before the first action potential. These experimental data were used to constrain a leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model of the neurons in this circuit. The post-synaptic potentials of the VNLL cell population were characterized using a method of triggered averaging. Analysis suggested that these inhibited VNLL cells...

Data from: Prescribed burning protects endangered tropical heathlands of the Arnhem Plateau, northern Australia

Brett P. Murphy, Mark A. Cochrane & Jeremy Russell-Smith
1. There are concerns that frequent intense fires are reducing biodiversity on the Arnhem Plateau within Kakadu National Park, northern Australia. Since the 1980s, prescribed burning in the early dry season has aimed to reduce the extent of late dry season wildfires. A programme of more strategic prescribed burning has been undertaken since 2007, aiming to increase intervals between fires affecting heathland and rain forest communities. 2. We assess the effectiveness of prescribed burning in...

Data from: Plasmodium vivax diversity and population structure across four continents

Cristian Koepfli, Priscila T. Rodrigues, Tiago Antao, Pamela Orjuela-Sánchez, Peter Van Den Eede, Dionicia Gamboa, Nguyen Van Hong, Jorge Bendezu, Annette Erhart, Céline Barnadas, Arsène Ratsimbasoa, Didier Menard, Carlo Severini, Michela Menegon, Baki Y. M. Nour, Nadira Karunaweera, Ivo Mueller, Marcelo U. Ferreira, Ingrid Felger & Bakri Y. M. Nour
Plasmodium vivax is the geographically most widespread human malaria parasite. To analyze patterns of microsatellite diversity and population structure across countries of different transmission intensity, genotyping data from 11 microsatellite markers was either generated or compiled from 841 isolates from four continents collected in 1999–2008. Diversity was highest in South-East Asia (mean allelic richness 10.0–12.8), intermediate in the South Pacific (8.1–9.9) Madagascar and Sudan (7.9–8.4), and lowest in South America and Central Asia (5.5–7.2). A...

Data from: Multifarious selection through environmental change: acidity and predator-mediated adaptive divergence in the moor frog (Rana arvalis)

Andrés Egea-Serrano, Sandra Hangartner, Anssi Laurila & Katja Räsänen
Environmental change can simultaneously cause abiotic stress and alter biological communities, yet adaptation of natural populations to co-changing environmental factors is poorly understood. We studied adaptation to acid and predator stress in six moor frog (Rana arvalis) populations along an acidification gradient, where abundance of invertebrate predators increases with increasing acidity of R. arvalis breeding ponds. First, we quantified divergence among the populations in anti-predator traits (behaviour and morphology) at different rearing conditions in the...

Data from: Evolutionary potential of multiple measures of upper thermal tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster

Sandra Hangartner & Ary A. Hoffmann
Thermal tolerance influences the distribution and abundance of many species, but the adaptive capacity of species to increase upper thermal tolerance is poorly understood. Given that patterns of heat tolerance can strongly depend on assay method, it is crucial to get a better understanding of genetic variances and correlations among different heat tolerance components. This study tests for correlated responses in different heat tolerance assays in Drosophila melanogaster lines selected for increased heat tolerance following...

Data from: Restricting access to invasion hubs enables sustained control of an invasive vertebrate

Mike Letnic, Jonathan K. Webb, Tim J. Jessop & Tim Dempster
Biological invasions often occur through expansion of satellite populations that become established at ‘invasion hubs’. Invasion hubs can result from random dispersal events, but frequently arise when invading individuals actively choose habitats using cues that signify high-quality environments where the fitness consequences are positive. Theoretical studies suggest that targeted control at invasion hubs can effectively suppress the populations and impacts of invaders. In arid Australia, small dams that provide water for livestock function as invasion...

Data from: Functional responses of insectivorous bats to increasing housing density support 'land-sparing' rather than ‘land-sharing’ urban growth strategies

Fiona M. Caryl, Linda F. Lumsden, Rodney Van Der Ree & Brendan A. Wintle
Debates about ‘land-sparing’ and ‘land-sharing’ strategies for conserving biodiversity in cities provide an overly simplistic characterization of alternate planning options. Increased urbanization manifests in a number of ways and sophisticated analyses of how species respond to urban environments are required before generalizations about the relative merits of either planning strategy should be made. We investigated how insectivorous bats respond to housing density (a measure of urbanization intensity) and a range of habitat variables by modelling...

Data from: Measurement of systemic mitochondrial function in advanced primary open-angle glaucoma and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

Nicole J. Van Bergen, Jonathan G. Crowston, Jamie E. Craig, Kathryn P. Burdon, Lisa S. Kearns, Shiwani Sharma, Alex W. Hewitt, David A. Mackey & Ian A. Trounce
Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to...

Data from: The contrasting phylodynamics of human influenza B viruses

Dhanasekaran Vijaykrishna, Edward C. Holmes, Udayan Joseph, Mathieu Fourment, Yvonne C. F. Su, Rebecca Halpin, Raphael T. C. Lee, Yi-Mo Deng, Vithiagaran Gunalan, Xudong Lin, Tim Stockwell, Nadia B. Fedorova, Bin Zhou, Natalie Spirason, Denise K. Kühnert, Veronika Bošková, Tanja Stadler, Anna-Maria Costa, Dominic E. Dwyer, Q. Sue Huang, Lance C. Jennings, William Rawlinson, Sheena G. Sullivan, Aeron C. Hurt, Sebastian Maurer-Stroh … & Raphael TC Lee
A complex interplay of viral, host and ecological factors shape the spatio-temporal incidence and evolution of human influenza viruses. Although considerable attention has been paid to influenza A viruses, a lack of equivalent data means that an integrated evolutionary and epidemiological framework has until now not been available for influenza B viruses, despite their significant disease burden. Through the analysis of over 900 full genomes from an epidemiological collection of more than 26,000 strains from...

Data from: The emergent geography of biophysical dispersal barriers across the Indo-West Pacific

Eric A. Treml, Jason Roberts, Patrick N. Halpin, Hugh P. Possingham & Cynthia Riginos
Aim: To discover and evaluate potential dispersal barriers across the Indo-West Pacific Ocean and to develop spatially explicit hypotheses regarding the location of barriers and their capacity to filter taxa. Additionally, to compare model predictions with previously described barriers and build a more thorough understanding of the region's biogeographic patterns. Location: The reefs of the Indo-West Pacific Ocean, from 100 to 170°E and from 30°N to 30°S. Methods: A biophysical larval dispersal model was used...

Data from: Ontogenetic and interspecific scaling of consumption in insects

James L. Maino & Michael R. Kearney
The uptake of resources from the environment is a basic feature of all life. Consumption rate has been found to scale with body size with an exponent close to unity across diverse organisms. However, past analyses have ignored the important distinction between ontogenetic and interspecific size comparisons. Using principles of dynamic energy budget theory, we present a mechanistic model for the body mass scaling of consumption, which separates interspecific size effects from ontogenetic size effects....

Data from: Genomic evidence for role of inversion 3RP of Drosophila melanogaster in facilitating climate change adaptation

Rahul V. Rane, Lea Rako, Siu Fai Lee, Ary A. Hoffmann & Martin Kapun
Chromosomal inversion polymorphisms are common in animals and plants, and recent models suggest that alternative arrangements spread by capturing different combinations of alleles acting additively or epistatically to favour local adaptation. It is also thought that inversions typically maintain favoured combinations for a long time by suppressing recombination between alternative chromosomal arrangements. Here, we consider patterns of linkage disequilibrium and genetic divergence in an old inversion polymorphism in Drosophila melanogaster (In(3R)Payne) known to be associated...

Data from: Application of wMelPop Wolbachia strain to crash local populations of Aedes aegypti

Scott A. Ritchie, Michael Townsend, Chris J. Paton, Ashley G. Callahan & Ary A. Hoffmann
The endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia pipientis (wMel strain) has been successfully established in several populations of Aedes aegypti, the primary dengue vector. The virulent Wolbachia strain wMelPop is known to cause several pathological impacts (increased egg mortality, life shortening, etc.) reducing overall fitness in the mosquito Ae. aegypti. Increased egg mortality could substantially reduce egg banks in areas with a lengthy monsoonal dry season, and be employed to eliminate local populations. We tested this application under...

Data from: Dendrogramma is a siphonophore

Timothy D. O'Hara, Andrew F. Hugall, Hugh MacIntosh, Kate M. Naughton, Alan Williams & Adnan Moussalli
Dendrogramma was the iconic deep-sea animal of 2014, voted among the top-ten new species described that year. The two species described are mushroom shaped animals, diploblastic, with an apparent gastrovascular system that extends from the base of the stalk to bifurcating canals that radiate through the flat disc. The authors could not assign the new genus to any known animal group with certainty, leading to numerous media reports that it belonged to an entirely new...

Data from: Predicting the evolutionary dynamics of seasonal adaptation to novel climates in Arabidopsis thaliana

Alexandre Fournier-Level, Emily O. Perry, Jonathan A. Wang, Peter T. Braun, Andrew Migneault, Martha D. Cooper, C. Jessica E. Metcalf & Johanna Schmitt
Anticipating the effect of climate change on plants requires understanding its evolutionary consequence on traits and genes in complex realistic environments. How seasonal variation has an impact on the dynamics of adaptation in natural populations remains unclear. We simulated adaptation to different climate change scenarios, grounding our analysis in experimental data and explicitly exploring seasonal variation. Seasonal variation dramatically affected the dynamics of adaptation: Marked seasonality led to genetic differentiation within the population to different...

Data from: Location-specific cuticular hydrocarbon signals in a social insect

Qike Wang, Jason Q. D. Goodger, Ian E. Woodrow & Mark A. Elgar
Social insects use cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) to convey different social signals, including colony or nest identity. Despite extensive investigations, the exact source and identity of CHCs that act as nest-specific identification signals remain largely unknown. Perhaps this is because studies that identify CHC signals typically use organic solvents to extract a single sample from the entire animal, thereby analysing a cocktail of chemicals that may serve several signal functions. We took a novel approach by...

Data from: Effectiveness and safety of 1 vs 4 h blood pressure profile with clinical and laboratory assessment for the exclusion of gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia: a retrospective study in a university affiliated maternity hospital

Elizabeth Anne McCarthy, Thomas A. Carins, Yolanda Hannigan, Nadia Bardien, Alexis Shub & Susan P. Walker
Objective: We asked whether 60 compared with 240 min observation is sufficiently informative and safe for pregnancy day assessment (PDAC) of suspected pre-eclampsia (PE). Design: A retrospective study of 209 pregnant women (475 PDAC assessments, 6 months) with routinely collected blood pressure (BP), symptom and laboratory information. We proposed a 60 min screening algorithm comprising: absence of symptoms, normal laboratory parameters and ≤1high-BP reading (systolic blood pressure, SBP 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic...

Data from: The scaling of population persistence with carrying capacity does not asymptote in populations of a fish experiencing extreme climate variability

Richard S.A. White, Brendan A. Wintle, Peter A. McHugh, Douglas J. Booker, Angus R. McIntosh & Richard S. A. White
Despite growing concerns regarding increasing frequency of extreme climate events and declining population sizes, the influence of environmental stochasticity on the relationship between population carrying capacity and time-to-extinction has received little empirical attention. While time-to-extinction increases exponentially with carrying capacity in constant environments, theoretical models suggest increasing environmental stochasticity causes asymptotic scaling, thus making minimum viable carrying capacity vastly uncertain in variable environments. Using empirical estimates of environmental stochasticity in fish metapopulations, we showed that...

Data from: Coupling biogeochemical tracers with fish growth reveals physiological and environmental controls on otolith chemistry

Gretchen L. Grammer, John R. Morrongiello, Christopher Izzo, Peter J. Hawthorne, John F. Middleton & Bronwyn M. Gillanders
Biogeochemical tracers found in the hard parts of organisms are frequently used to answer key ecological questions by linking the organism with the environment. However, the biogeochemical relationship between the environment and the biogenic structure becomes less predictable in higher organisms as physiological processes become more complex. Here, we use the simultaneous combination of biogeochemical tracers and fish growth analyzed with a novel modeling framework to describe physiological and environmental controls on otolith chemistry in...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    15
  • 2020
    33
  • 2019
    22
  • 2018
    39
  • 2017
    53
  • 2016
    39
  • 2015
    34
  • 2014
    24
  • 2013
    9
  • 2012
    2

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    272
  • Text
    6
  • Conference Paper
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Melbourne
    279
  • Monash University
    36
  • Australian National University
    18
  • University of Queensland
    15
  • UNSW Sydney
    14
  • James Cook University
    12
  • University of Sydney
    11
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    11
  • Museum Victoria
    10
  • La Trobe University
    9