268 Works

Mammal detection data for the SAFE project site, Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, 2015 [HMTF]

N.J. Deere, G. Guillera-Arroita, E.L. Baking, H. Bernard, M. Pfeifer, G. Reynolds, O.R. Wearn, Z.G. Davies & M.J. Struebig
This data set contains stacked detection matrices for 28 recorded mammal species across 115 sampling locations at the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) project site located in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Information for each camera trap sampling location, including spatial information and sampling effort is included. Data were collected in order to determine the contribution of carbon-based policies to biodiversity conservation in agricultural land-use mosaics. These data are essential to the development of the occupancy...

Data from: High nucleotide diversity and limited linkage disequilibrium in Helicoverpa armigera facilitates the detection of a selective sweep

Sue V. Song, Sharon Downes, Tracey Parker, John G. Oakeshott & Charles Robin
Insecticides impose extreme selective pressures on populations of target pests and so insecticide resistance loci of these species may provide the footprints of ‘selective sweeps’. To lay the foundation for future genome-wide scans for selective sweeps and inform genome-wide association study designs, we set out to characterize some of the baseline population genomic parameters of one of the most damaging insect pests in agriculture worldwide, Helicoverpa armigera. To this end, we surveyed nine Z-linked loci...

Data from: Low evolutionary potential for egg-to-adult viability in Drosophila melanogaster at high temperatures

Torsten Nygaard Kristensen, Johannes Overgaard, Jan Lassen, Ary A. Hoffmann & Carla M. Sgro
To cope with the increasing and less predictable temperature forecasts under climate change, many terrestrial ectotherms will have to migrate or rely on adaptation through plastic or evolutionary means. Studies suggest that some ectotherms have a limited potential to change their upper thermal limits via evolutionary shifts, but research has mostly focused on adult life stages under laboratory conditions. Here we use replicate populations of Drosophila melanogaster and a nested half sib/full sib quantitative genetic...

Data from: Adoption in eastern grey kangaroos: a consequence of misdirected care?

Wendy J. King, David M. Forsyth, Graeme Coulson & Marco Festa-Bianchet
Adoption is rare in animals and is usually attributed to kin selection. In a 6-year study of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), 11 of 326 juveniles were adopted. We detected eight adoptions by observing behavioural associations and nursing between marked mothers and young and three more by analysing the relatedness of mothers and young using microsatellite DNA. Four adoptions involved reciprocal switches and three were by mothers whose own pouch young were known to subsequently...

Data from: Incidence of influenza A(H3N2) virus infections in Hong Kong in a longitudinal sero-epidemiological study, 2009-2015

Vivian W. I. Wei, Jessica Y. T. Wong, Ranawaka A. P. M. Perera, Kin On Kwok, Vicky J. Fang, Ian G. Barr, J. S. Malik Peiris, Steven Riley & Benjamin J. Cowling
Background: Many serologic studies were done during and after the 2009 influenza pandemic, to estimate the cumulative incidence of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections, but there are few comparative estimates of the incidence of influenza A(H3N2) virus infections during epidemics. Methods: We conducted a longitudinal serologic study in Hong Kong. We collected sera annually and tested samples from 2009-13 by HAI against the A/Perth/16/2009(H3N2) virus, and samples from 2013-15 against the A/Victoria/361/2011(H3N2) virus using the hemagglutination...

Data from: Local endemism and within-island diversification of shrews illustrate the importance of speciation in building Sundaland mammal diversity

Terrence C. Demos, Anang S. Achmadi, Thomas C. Giarla, Heru Handika, , Kevin C. Rowe & Jacob A. Esselstyn
Island systems are important models for evolutionary biology because they provide convenient, discrete biogeographic units of study. Continental islands with a history of intermittent dry land connections confound the discrete definitions of islands and have led zoologists to predict (1) little differentiation of terrestrial organisms among continental shelf islands and (2) extinction, rather than speciation, to be the main cause of differences in community composition among islands. However, few continental island systems have been subjected...

Data from: Multiple refugia from penultimate glaciations in East Asia demonstrated by phylogeography and ecological modelling of an insect pest

Wei Song, Li-Jun Cao, Bing-Yan Li, Ya-Jun Gong, Ary A. Hoffmann & Shu-Jun Wei
Background: Refugial populations in Quaternary glaciations are critical to understanding the evolutionary history and climatic interactions of many extant species. Compared with the well-studied areas of Europe and Northern America, refugia of species in eastern Asia remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the phylogeographic history of a globally important insect pest, the oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta, in its native range of China. Results: Genetic structure analyses unveiled three distinct groups and a set of...

Data from: Enhancing plant diversity in a novel grassland using seed addition

Tara J. Zamin, Alex Jolly, Steve Sinclair, John W. Morgan & Joslin L. Moore
1.Restoration of novel ecosystems to a historical benchmark may not always be possible or advisable. Novel ecosystems may be managed by targeting specific components and accepting the novelty of other ecosystem attributes. The feasibility of this component-wise management of novel ecosystems has rarely been tested. 2.In a novel grassland, where C3 grasses have replaced C4 grasses, nutrients have been elevated, and diversity has been lost due to a history of agricultural land use, we aimed...

Data from: A revision of the bioregionalisation of freshwater fish communities in the Australian Monsoonal Tropics

James J. Shelley, Tim Dempster, Matthew C. Le Feuvre, Peter J. Unmack, Shawn W. Laffan & Stephen E. Swearer
The Australian freshwater fish fauna is very unique, but poorly understood. In the Australian Monsoonal Tropics (AMT) biome of northern Australia, the number of described and candidate species has nearly doubled since the last attempt to analyse freshwater fish species composition patterns and determine a bioregionalisation scheme. Here, we utilise the most complete database of catchment‐scale freshwater fish distributions from the AMT to date to: (a) reanalyze spatial patterns of species richness, endemism and turnover...

Data from: Combining optimization and simulation modelling to measure the cumulative impacts of prescribed fire and wildfire on vegetation species diversity

Matthew P. Chick, Alan York, Holly Sitters, Julian Di Stefano & Craig R. Nitschke
1. Growth-stage optimisation (GSO) offers a new approach to biodiversity conservation in fire-prone regions through estimating the optimal distribution of vegetation growth stages that maximises a species diversity index. This optimal growth-stage structure provides managers an operational goal explicitly linked to a positive conservation outcome but does not define the fire regime needed to achieve it. 2. We paired GSO with LANDIS II, a landscape succession and disturbance simulation model, to (1) estimate the optimal...

Data from: Adaptation to reef habitats through selection on the coral animal and its associated microbiome

Madeleine J.H. Van Oppen, Pim Bongaerts, Pedro Frade, Lesa M. Peplow, Sarah E. Boyd, Hieu T. Nim, Line K. Bay & Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen
Spatially adjacent habitats on coral reefs can represent highly distinct environments, often harbouring different coral communities. Yet, certain coral species thrive across divergent environments. It is unknown whether the forces of selection are sufficiently strong to overcome the counteracting effects of the typically high gene flow over short distances, and for local adaptation to occur. We screened the coral genome (using restriction-site-associated sequencing [RAD-seq]), and characterized both the dinoflagellate photosymbiont and tissue-associated prokaryote microbiomes (using...

Data from: The microstructure of white feathers predicts their visible and near-infrared reflectance properties

Devi Stuart-Fox, Elizabeth Newton, Raoul A. Mulder, Liliana D'Alba, Matthew D. Shawkey, Branislav Igic & Liliana D’Alba
Research on the optical properties of animal integuments, including fur, feather, skin and cuticle, has focussed almost exclusively on animal-visible wavelengths within the narrow range of 300 - 700 nm. By contrast, the near-infrared (NIR) portion of direct sunlight, spanning 700 - 2600 nm, has been largely ignored despite its potentially important thermal consequences. We quantified variation in visible and NIR reflectance and transmission for white body contour feathers of 50 bird species, and examined...

Data from: Night warming on hot days produces novel impacts on development, survival and reproduction in a small arthropod

Fei Zhao, Wei Zhang, Ary A. Hoffmann & Chun-Sen Ma
1. An asymmetric increase of nighttime temperatures on hot days is one of the main features of global climate change. But the biological effects of an increased nighttime temperature combined with high daytime temperature are unclear. 2. We used six thermal regimens to simulate nighttime temperatures on hot days and investigated the effects of night warming on life history traits of the English grain aphid Sitobion avenae. Experimental temperatures fluctuated in continuous diurnal cycles, increasing...

Data from: Testing the impact of calibration on molecular divergence times using a fossil-rich group: the case of Nothofagus (Fagales)

Hervé Sauquet, Simon Y. W. Ho, Maria A. Gandolfo, Gregory J. Jordan, Peter Wilf, David J. Cantrill, Michael J. Bayly, Lindell Bromham, Gillian K. Brown, Raymond J. Carpenter, Daphne M. Lee, Daniel J. Murphy, J. M. Kale Sniderman & Frank Udovicic
Although temporal calibration is widely recognized as critical for obtaining accurate divergence-time estimates using molecular dating methods, few studies have evaluated the variation resulting from different calibration strategies. Depending on the information available, researchers have often used primary calibrations from the fossil record or secondary calibrations from previous molecular dating studies. In analyses of flowering plants, primary calibration data can be obtained from macro- and mesofossils (e.g., leaves, flowers, and fruits) or microfossils (e.g., pollen)....

Data from: Complexity of the genetic basis of aging in nature revealed by a clinal study of lifespan and methuselah, a gene for aging, in Drosophila from eastern Australia.

Carla M. Sgrò, Belinda Van Heerwaarden, Vanessa Kellermann, Choon Wei Wee, Ary A. Hoffmann & Siu Fai Lee
Clinal studies are a powerful tool for understanding the genetic basis of climatic adaptation. However, while clines in quantitative traits and genetic polymorphisms have been observed within and across continents, few studies have attempted to demonstrate direct links between them. The gene methuselah in Drosophila has been shown to have a major effect on stress response and longevity phenotypes based largely on laboratory studies of induced mutations in the mth gene. Clinal patterns in the...

Data from: A collection of Australian Drosophila datasets on climate adaptation and species distributions

Ary A. Hoffmann, Ailie Smith, Philippa C. Griffin & Sandra B. Hangartner
The Australian Drosophila Ecology and Evolution Resource (ADEER) collates Australian datasets on drosophilid flies, which are aimed at investigating questions around climate adaptation, species distribution limits and population genetics. Australian drosophilid species are diverse in climatic tolerance, geographic distribution and behaviour. Many species are restricted to the tropics, a few are temperate specialists, and some have broad distributions across climatic regions. Whereas some species show adaptability to climate changes through genetic and plastic changes, other...

Data from: High monetary reward rates and caloric rewards decrease temporal persistence

Bowen J. Fung, Stefan Bode & Carsten Murawski
Temporal persistence refers to an individual's capacity to wait for future rewards, while forgoing possible alternatives. This requires a trade-off between the potential value of delayed rewards and opportunity costs, and is relevant to many real-world decisions, such as dieting. Theoretical models have previously suggested that high monetary reward rates, or positive energy balance, may result in decreased temporal persistence. In our study, 50 fasted participants engaged in a temporal persistence task, incentivised with monetary...

Data from: Female song is widespread and ancestral in songbirds

Karan J. Odom, Michelle L. Hall, Katharina Riebel, Kevin E. Omland & Naomi E. Langmore
Bird song has historically been considered an almost exclusively male trait, an observation fundamental to the formulation of Darwin’s theory of sexual selection. Like other male ornaments, song is used by male songbirds to attract females and compete with rivals. Thus, bird song has become a textbook example of the power of sexual selection to lead to extreme neurological and behavioural sex differences. Here we present an extensive survey and ancestral state reconstruction of female...

Data from: Predicting climate warming effects on green turtle hatchling viability and dispersal performance

Catherine Cavallo, David Booth, Tim Dempster, Michael R. Kearney, Ella Kelly & Tim S. Jessop
1. Ectotherms are taxa considered highly sensitive to rapid climate warming. This is because body temperature profoundly governs their performance, fitness and life history. Yet, while several modelling approaches currently predict thermal effects on some aspects of life history and demography, they do not consider how temperature simultaneously affects developmental success and offspring phenotypic performance, two additional key attributes that are needed to comprehensively understand species responses to climate warming. 2. Here, we developed a...

Data from: The effect of virus-blocking Wolbachia on male competitiveness of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti

Michal Segoli, Ary A. Hoffmann, Jane Lloyd, Gavin J. Omodei & Scott A. Ritchie
Background: The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia blocks the transmission of dengue virus by its vector mosquito Aedes aegypti, and is currently being evaluated for control of dengue outbreaks. Wolbachia induces cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) that results in the developmental failure of offspring in the cross between Wolbachia-infected males and uninfected females. This increases the relative success of infected females in the population, thereby enhancing the spread of the beneficial bacterium. However, Wolbachia spread via CI will only...

Data from: Phylogeographic structure, demographic history, and morph composition in a colour polymorphic lizard

Claire A. McLean, Devi Stuart-Fox & Adnan Moussalli
In polymorphic species, population divergence in morph composition and frequency has the potential to promote speciation. We assessed the relationship between geographic variation in male throat colour polymorphism and phylogeographic structure in the tawny dragon lizard, Ctenophorus decresii. We identified four genetically distinct lineages, corresponding to two polymorphic lineages in the Northern Flinders Ranges and Southern Flinders Ranges/Olary Ranges regions respectively, and a monomorphic lineage in the Mt Lofty Ranges/Kangaroo Island region. The degree of...

Data from: Crossing the line: increasing body size in a trans-Wallacean lizard radiation (Cyrtodactylus, Gekkota)

Paul M. Oliver, Phillip Skipwith & Michael S. Y. Lee
The region between the Asian and Australian continental plates (Wallacea) demarcates the transition between two differentiated regional biotas. Despite this striking pattern, some terrestrial lineages have successfully traversed the marine barriers of Wallacea and subsequently diversified in newly colonized regions. The hypothesis that these dispersals between biogeographic realms are correlated with detectable shifts in evolutionary trajectory has however rarely been tested. Here, we analyse the evolution of body size in a widespread and exceptionally diverse...

Data from: An antibody screen of a Plasmodium vivax antigen library identifies novel merozoite proteins associated with clinical protection

Camila T. França, Jessica B. Hostetler, Sumana Sharma, Michael T. White, Enmoore Lin, Benson Kiniboro, Andreea Waltmann, Andrew W. Darcy, Connie S. Li Wai Suen, Peter Siba, Christopher L. King, Julian C. Rayner, Rick M. Fairhurst, Ivo Mueller & Connie S. N. Li Wai Suen
Background. Elimination of Plasmodium vivax malaria would be greatly facilitated by the development of an effective vaccine. A comprehensive and systematic characterization of antibodies to P. vivax antigens in exposed populations is useful in guiding rational vaccine design. Methodology/Principal Findings. In this study, we investigated antibodies to a large library of P. vivax entire ectodomain merozoite proteins in 2 Asia-Pacific populations, analysing the relationship of antibody levels with markers of current and cumulative malaria exposure,...

Data from: Landscape genomics reveals altered genome wide diversity within revegetated stands of Eucalyptus microcarpa (Grey Box)

Rebecca Jordan, Shannon K. Dillon, Suzanne M. Prober & Ary A. Hoffmann
In order to contribute to evolutionary resilience and adaptive potential in highly modified landscapes, revegetated areas should ideally reflect levels of genetic diversity within and across natural stands. Landscape genomic analyses enable such diversity patterns to be characterized at genome and chromosomal levels. Landscape-wide patterns of genomic diversity were assessed in Eucalyptus microcarpa, a dominant tree species widely used in revegetation in Southeastern Australia. Trees from small and large patches within large remnants, small isolated...

Data from: Kinetic estimation of GFR improves prediction of dialysis and recovery after kidney transplantation

Timothy J. Pianta, Zoltan H. Endre, John W. Pickering, Nicholas A. Buckley & Philip W. Peake
Background: The early prediction of delayed graft function (DGF) would facilitate patient management after kidney transplantation. Methods: In a single-centre retrospective analysis, we investigated kinetic estimated GFR under non-steady-state conditions, KeGFR, in prediction of DGF. KeGFRsCr was calculated at 4h, 8h and 12h in 56 recipients of deceased donor kidneys from initial serum creatinine (sCr) concentrations, estimated creatinine production rate, volume of distribution, and the difference between consecutive sCr values. The utility of KeGFRsCr for...

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