34 Works

Data from: Blood-stage parasitaemia and age determine Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax gametocytaemia in Papua New Guinea

Cristian Koepfli, Leanne J. Robinson, Patricia Rarau, Mary Salib, Naomi Sambale, Rahel Wampfler, Inoni Betuela, Wang Nuitragool, Alyssa E. Barry, Peter Siba, Ingrid Felger & Ivo Mueller
A better understanding of human-to-mosquito transmission is crucial to control malaria. In order to assess factors associated with gametocyte carriage, 2083 samples were collected in a cross-sectional survey in Papua New Guinea. Plasmodium species were detected by light microscopy and qPCR and gametocytes by detection of pfs25 and pvs25 mRNA transcripts by reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). The parasite prevalence by PCR was 18.5% for Plasmodium falciparum and 13.0% for P. vivax. 52.5% of all infections were...

Data from: The Pillars of Hercules as a bathymetric barrier to gene-flow promoting isolation in a global deep-sea shark (Centroscymnus coelolepis)

Diana Catarino, Halvor Knutsen, Ana Veríssimo, Esben Moland Olsen, Per Erik Jorde, Gui Menezes, Hanne Sannæs, David Stanković, Joan Batista Company, Francis Neat, Roberto Danovaro, Antonio Dell'Anno, Bastien Rochowski, Sergio Stefanni, Joan Baptista Company & Hanne Sannaes
Knowledge of the mechanisms limiting connectivity and gene-flow in deep-sea ecosystems is limited, especially for deep-sea sharks. The Portuguese dogfish (Centroscymnus coelolepis) is a globally distributed and Near Threatened deep-sea shark. C. coelolepis population structure was studied using 11 nuclear microsatellite markers and a 497 bp fragment from the mtDNA Control Region. High levels of genetic homogeneity across the Atlantic (ΦST=-0.0091, FST= 0.0024, P > 0.05) were found suggesting one large population unit at this...

Data from: Strategies for understanding and reducing the Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium ovale hypnozoite reservoir in Papua New Guinean children: a randomised placebo-controlled trial and mathematical model

Leanne J. Robinson, Rahel Wampfler, Inoni Betuela, Stephan Karl, Michael T. White, Connie S. N. Li Wai Suen, Natalie E. Hofmann, Benson Kiniboro, Andreea Waltmann, Jessica Brewster, Lina Lorry, Nandao Tarongka, Lornah Samol, Mariabeth Silkey, Quique Bassat, Peter M. Siba, Louis Schofield, Ingrid Felger, Ivo Mueller & Benson Kinboro
Background: The undetectable hypnozoite reservoir for relapsing Plasmodium vivax and P. ovale malarias presents a major challenge for malaria control and elimination in endemic countries. This study aims to directly determine the contribution of relapses to the burden of P. vivax and P. ovale infection, illness, and transmission in Papua New Guinean children. Methods and Findings: From 17 August 2009 to 20 May 2010, 524 children aged 5–10 y from East Sepik Province in Papua...

Data from: Parasite and predator risk assessment: nuanced use of olfactory cues

John G. Sharp, Sarah Garnick, Mark A. Elgar & Graeme Coulson
Foraging herbivores face twin threats of predation and parasite infection, but the risk of predation has received much more attention. We evaluated, experimentally, the role of olfactory cues in predator and parasite risk assessment on the foraging behaviour of a population of marked, free-ranging, red-necked wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus). The wallabies adjusted their behaviour according to these olfactory cues. They foraged less, were more vigilant and spent less time at feeders placed in the vicinity of...

Data from: Trait anticipatory pleasure predicts effort expenditure for reward

Joachim T. Geaney, Michael T. Treadway & Luke D. Smillie
Research in motivation and emotion has been increasingly influenced by the perspective that processes underpinning the motivated approach of rewarding goals are distinct from those underpinning enjoyment during reward consummation. This distinction recently inspired the construction of the Temporal Experience of Pleasure Scale (TEPS), a self-report measure that distinguishes trait anticipatory pleasure (pre-reward feelings of desire) from consummatory pleasure (feelings of enjoyment and gratification upon reward attainment). In a university community sample (N = 97),...

Data from: A global synthesis of survival estimates for microbats

Pia E. Lentini, Tomas J. Bird, Stephen R. Griffiths, Lisa N. Godinho & Brendan A. Wintle
Accurate survival estimates are needed to construct robust population models, which are a powerful tool for understanding and predicting the fates of species under scenarios of environmental change. Microbats make up 17% of the global mammalian fauna, yet the processes that drive differences in demographics between species are poorly understood. We collected survival estimates for 44 microbat species from the literature and constructed a model to determine the effects of reproductive, feeding and demographic traits...

Data from: Patterns of niche filling and expansion across the invaded ranges of an Australian lizard

Reid Tingley, Michael B. Thompson, Stephen Hartley & David G. Chapple
Studies of realized niche shifts in alien species typically ignore the potential effects of intraspecific niche variation and different invaded-range environments on niche lability. We incorporate our detailed knowledge of the native-range source populations and global introduction history of the delicate skink Lampropholis delicata to examine intraspecific variation in realized niche expansion and unfilling, and investigate how alternative niche modelling approaches are affected by that variation. We analyzed the realized niche dynamics of L. delicata...

Data from: Vaccination method affects immune response and bacterial growth but not protection in the Salmonella Typhimurium animal model of typhoid

Clare L. Kinnear & Richard A. Strugnell
Understanding immune responses elicited by vaccines, together with immune responses required for protection, is fundamental to designing effective vaccines and immunisation programs. This study examines the effects of the route of administration of a live attenuated vaccine on its interactions with, and stimulation of, the murine immune system as well as its ability to increase survival and provide protection from colonisation by a virulent challenge strain. We assess the effect of administration method using the...

Data from: High Rates of Asymptomatic, Sub-microscopic Plasmodium vivax Infection and Disappearing Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in an Area of Low Transmission in Solomon Islands

Andreea Waltmann, Andrew W. Darcy, Ivor Harris, Cristian Koepfli, John Lodo, Ventis Vahi, David Piziki, G. Dennis Shanks, Alyssa Barry, Maxine Whittaker, James W. Kazura, Ivo Mueller & Alyssa E. Barry
Introduction: Solomon Islands is intensifying national efforts to achieve malaria elimination. A long history of indoor spraying with residual insecticides, combined recently with distribution of long lasting insecticidal nets and artemether-lumefantrine therapy, has been implemented in Solomon Islands. The impact of these interventions on local endemicity of Plasmodium spp. is unknown. Methods: In 2012, a cross-sectional survey of 3501 residents of all ages was conducted in Ngella, Central Islands Province, Solomon Islands. Prevalence of Plasmodium...

Data from: Bird functional diversity decreases with time since disturbance: does patchy prescribed fire enhance ecosystem function?

Holly Sitters, Julian Di Stefano, Fiona Jane Christie, Matthew Swan, Alan York & Fiona Christie
Animal species diversity is often associated with time since disturbance, but the effects of disturbances such as fire on functional diversity are unknown. Functional diversity measures the range, abundance and distribution of trait values in a community, and links changes in species composition with the consequences for ecosystem function. Improved understanding of the relationship between time since fire (TSF) and functional diversity is critical given that the frequency of both prescribed fire and wildfire is...

Data from: Population structure and history of the Welsh sheep breeds determined by whole genome genotyping

Sarah E. Beynon, Gancho T. Slavov, Marta Farré, Bolormaa Sunduimijid, Kate Waddams, Brian Davies, William Haresign, James Kijas, Iona M. MacLeod, C. Jamie Newbold, Lynfa Davies & Denis M. Larkin
Background: One of the most economically important areas within the Welsh agricultural sector is sheep farming, contributing around £230 million to the UK economy annually. Phenotypic selection over several centuries has generated a number of native sheep breeds, which are presumably adapted to the diverse and challenging landscape of Wales. Little is known about the history, genetic diversity and relationships of these breeds with other European breeds. We genotyped 353 individuals from 18 native Welsh...

Data from: A systematic review and meta-analysis of gene therapy in animal models of cerebral glioma: why did promise not translate to human therapy?

Theodore C. Hirst, Hanna M. Vesterinen, Samantha Conlin, Kieren J. Egan, Ana Antonic, Aaron Lawson McLean, Malcolm R. Macleod, Robin Grant, Paul M. Brennan, Emily S. Sena & Ian R. Whittle
Background: The development of therapeutics is often characterized by promising animal research that fails to translate into clinical efficacy; this holds for the development of gene therapy in glioma. We tested the hypothesis that this is because of limitations in the internal and external validity of studies reporting the use of gene therapy in experimental glioma. Method: We systematically identified studies testing gene therapy in rodent glioma models by searching three online databases. The number...

Data from: Point process models for presence-only analysis

Ian W. Renner, Jane Elith, Adrian Baddeley, William Fithian, Trevor Hastie, Steven Phillips, Gordana Popovic & David I. Warton
1. Presence-only data are widely used for species distribution modelling, and point process regression models are a exible tool that has considerable potential for this problem, when data arise as point events. 2. In this paper we review point process models, some of their advantages, and some common methods of fitting them to presence-only data. 3. Advantages include (and are not limited to): clarification of what the response variable is that is modelled; a framework...

Data from: Assortative mating among animals of captive and wild origin following experimental conservation releases

Brendan Slade, Marissa L. Parrott, Aleisha Paproth, Michael J. L. Magrath, Graeme R. Gillespie & Tim S. Jessop
Captive breeding is a high profile management tool used for conserving threatened species. However, the inevitable consequence of generations in captivity is broad scale and often-rapid phenotypic divergence between captive and wild individuals, through environmental differences and genetic processes. Although poorly understood, mate choice preference is one of the changes that may occur in captivity that could have important implications for the reintroduction success of captive-bred animals. We bred wild-caught house mice for three generations...

Data from: Estimating age and age class of harvested hog deer from eye lens mass using frequentist and Bayesian methods

David M. Forsyth, Mathieu Garel & Steve R. McLeod
Estimation of the age or age class of harvested animals is often necessary to interpret the condition and dynamics of wildlife populations. The mammalian eye lens continues to grow until death and hence the dry mass of the eye lens has commonly been used to estimate the age of mammals. The method requires the relationship between eye lens mass and age to be parameterized using individuals of known age. However, predicting age is complicated by...

Data from: Mother-offspring distances reflect sex differences in fine-scale genetic structure of eastern grey kangaroos

Wendy J. King, Dany Garant & Marco Festa-Bianchet
Natal dispersal affects life history and population biology and causes gene flow. In mammals, dispersal is usually male-biased so that females tend to be philopatric and surrounded by matrilineal kin, which may lead to preferential associations among female kin. Here we combine genetic analyses and behavioral observations to investigate spatial genetic structure and sex-biased dispersal patterns in a high-density population of mammals showing fission–fusion group dynamics. We studied eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) over 2...

Data from: Mitochondrial DNA variants help monitor the dynamics of Wolbachia invasion into host populations

Heng Lin Yeap, Gordana Rašić, Nancy M. Endersby-Harshman, Siu F. Lee, Eggi Arguni, Hoang Le Nguyen & Ary A. Hoffmann
Wolbachia is the most widespread endosymbiotic bacterium of insects and other arthropods that can rapidly invade host populations. Deliberate releases of Wolbachia into natural populations of the dengue fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, are used as a novel biocontrol strategy for dengue suppression. Invasion of Wolbachia through the host population relies on factors such as high fidelity of the endosymbiont transmission and limited immigration of uninfected individuals, but these factors can be difficult to measure. One...

Data from: High nucleotide diversity and limited linkage disequilibrium in Helicoverpa armigera facilitates the detection of a selective sweep

Sue V. Song, Sharon Downes, Tracey Parker, John G. Oakeshott & Charles Robin
Insecticides impose extreme selective pressures on populations of target pests and so insecticide resistance loci of these species may provide the footprints of ‘selective sweeps’. To lay the foundation for future genome-wide scans for selective sweeps and inform genome-wide association study designs, we set out to characterize some of the baseline population genomic parameters of one of the most damaging insect pests in agriculture worldwide, Helicoverpa armigera. To this end, we surveyed nine Z-linked loci...

Data from: Kinetic estimation of GFR improves prediction of dialysis and recovery after kidney transplantation

Timothy J. Pianta, Zoltan H. Endre, John W. Pickering, Nicholas A. Buckley & Philip W. Peake
Background: The early prediction of delayed graft function (DGF) would facilitate patient management after kidney transplantation. Methods: In a single-centre retrospective analysis, we investigated kinetic estimated GFR under non-steady-state conditions, KeGFR, in prediction of DGF. KeGFRsCr was calculated at 4h, 8h and 12h in 56 recipients of deceased donor kidneys from initial serum creatinine (sCr) concentrations, estimated creatinine production rate, volume of distribution, and the difference between consecutive sCr values. The utility of KeGFRsCr for...

Data from: Adoption in eastern grey kangaroos: a consequence of misdirected care?

Wendy J. King, David M. Forsyth, Graeme Coulson & Marco Festa-Bianchet
Adoption is rare in animals and is usually attributed to kin selection. In a 6-year study of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), 11 of 326 juveniles were adopted. We detected eight adoptions by observing behavioural associations and nursing between marked mothers and young and three more by analysing the relatedness of mothers and young using microsatellite DNA. Four adoptions involved reciprocal switches and three were by mothers whose own pouch young were known to subsequently...

Data from: Low evolutionary potential for egg-to-adult viability in Drosophila melanogaster at high temperatures

Torsten Nygaard Kristensen, Johannes Overgaard, Jan Lassen, Ary A. Hoffmann & Carla M. Sgro
To cope with the increasing and less predictable temperature forecasts under climate change, many terrestrial ectotherms will have to migrate or rely on adaptation through plastic or evolutionary means. Studies suggest that some ectotherms have a limited potential to change their upper thermal limits via evolutionary shifts, but research has mostly focused on adult life stages under laboratory conditions. Here we use replicate populations of Drosophila melanogaster and a nested half sib/full sib quantitative genetic...

Data from: A collection of Australian Drosophila datasets on climate adaptation and species distributions

Ary A. Hoffmann, Ailie Smith, Philippa C. Griffin & Sandra B. Hangartner
The Australian Drosophila Ecology and Evolution Resource (ADEER) collates Australian datasets on drosophilid flies, which are aimed at investigating questions around climate adaptation, species distribution limits and population genetics. Australian drosophilid species are diverse in climatic tolerance, geographic distribution and behaviour. Many species are restricted to the tropics, a few are temperate specialists, and some have broad distributions across climatic regions. Whereas some species show adaptability to climate changes through genetic and plastic changes, other...

Data from: Evolutionary potential of multiple measures of upper thermal tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster

Sandra Hangartner & Ary A. Hoffmann
Thermal tolerance influences the distribution and abundance of many species, but the adaptive capacity of species to increase upper thermal tolerance is poorly understood. Given that patterns of heat tolerance can strongly depend on assay method, it is crucial to get a better understanding of genetic variances and correlations among different heat tolerance components. This study tests for correlated responses in different heat tolerance assays in Drosophila melanogaster lines selected for increased heat tolerance following...

Data from: Ontogenetic and interspecific scaling of consumption in insects

James L. Maino & Michael R. Kearney
The uptake of resources from the environment is a basic feature of all life. Consumption rate has been found to scale with body size with an exponent close to unity across diverse organisms. However, past analyses have ignored the important distinction between ontogenetic and interspecific size comparisons. Using principles of dynamic energy budget theory, we present a mechanistic model for the body mass scaling of consumption, which separates interspecific size effects from ontogenetic size effects....

Data from: Genomic evidence for role of inversion 3RP of Drosophila melanogaster in facilitating climate change adaptation

Rahul V. Rane, Lea Rako, Siu Fai Lee, Ary A. Hoffmann & Martin Kapun
Chromosomal inversion polymorphisms are common in animals and plants, and recent models suggest that alternative arrangements spread by capturing different combinations of alleles acting additively or epistatically to favour local adaptation. It is also thought that inversions typically maintain favoured combinations for a long time by suppressing recombination between alternative chromosomal arrangements. Here, we consider patterns of linkage disequilibrium and genetic divergence in an old inversion polymorphism in Drosophila melanogaster (In(3R)Payne) known to be associated...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    34

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    34

Affiliations

  • University of Melbourne
    34
  • University of Queensland
    4
  • Monash University
    4
  • Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research
    3
  • University of Basel
    3
  • University of Sydney
    3
  • Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute
    3
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research
    2