39 Works

Data from: Local endemism and within-island diversification of shrews illustrate the importance of speciation in building Sundaland mammal diversity

Terrence C. Demos, Anang S. Achmadi, Thomas C. Giarla, Heru Handika, , Kevin C. Rowe & Jacob A. Esselstyn
Island systems are important models for evolutionary biology because they provide convenient, discrete biogeographic units of study. Continental islands with a history of intermittent dry land connections confound the discrete definitions of islands and have led zoologists to predict (1) little differentiation of terrestrial organisms among continental shelf islands and (2) extinction, rather than speciation, to be the main cause of differences in community composition among islands. However, few continental island systems have been subjected...

Data from: An antibody screen of a Plasmodium vivax antigen library identifies novel merozoite proteins associated with clinical protection

Camila T. França, Jessica B. Hostetler, Sumana Sharma, Michael T. White, Enmoore Lin, Benson Kiniboro, Andreea Waltmann, Andrew W. Darcy, Connie S. Li Wai Suen, Peter Siba, Christopher L. King, Julian C. Rayner, Rick M. Fairhurst, Ivo Mueller & Connie S. N. Li Wai Suen
Background. Elimination of Plasmodium vivax malaria would be greatly facilitated by the development of an effective vaccine. A comprehensive and systematic characterization of antibodies to P. vivax antigens in exposed populations is useful in guiding rational vaccine design. Methodology/Principal Findings. In this study, we investigated antibodies to a large library of P. vivax entire ectodomain merozoite proteins in 2 Asia-Pacific populations, analysing the relationship of antibody levels with markers of current and cumulative malaria exposure,...

Data from: Landscape genomics reveals altered genome wide diversity within revegetated stands of Eucalyptus microcarpa (Grey Box)

Rebecca Jordan, Shannon K. Dillon, Suzanne M. Prober & Ary A. Hoffmann
In order to contribute to evolutionary resilience and adaptive potential in highly modified landscapes, revegetated areas should ideally reflect levels of genetic diversity within and across natural stands. Landscape genomic analyses enable such diversity patterns to be characterized at genome and chromosomal levels. Landscape-wide patterns of genomic diversity were assessed in Eucalyptus microcarpa, a dominant tree species widely used in revegetation in Southeastern Australia. Trees from small and large patches within large remnants, small isolated...

Data from: Dendrogramma is a siphonophore

Timothy D. O'Hara, Andrew F. Hugall, Hugh MacIntosh, Kate M. Naughton, Alan Williams & Adnan Moussalli
Dendrogramma was the iconic deep-sea animal of 2014, voted among the top-ten new species described that year. The two species described are mushroom shaped animals, diploblastic, with an apparent gastrovascular system that extends from the base of the stalk to bifurcating canals that radiate through the flat disc. The authors could not assign the new genus to any known animal group with certainty, leading to numerous media reports that it belonged to an entirely new...

Data from: Predicting the evolutionary dynamics of seasonal adaptation to novel climates in Arabidopsis thaliana

Alexandre Fournier-Level, Emily O. Perry, Jonathan A. Wang, Peter T. Braun, Andrew Migneault, Martha D. Cooper, C. Jessica E. Metcalf & Johanna Schmitt
Anticipating the effect of climate change on plants requires understanding its evolutionary consequence on traits and genes in complex realistic environments. How seasonal variation has an impact on the dynamics of adaptation in natural populations remains unclear. We simulated adaptation to different climate change scenarios, grounding our analysis in experimental data and explicitly exploring seasonal variation. Seasonal variation dramatically affected the dynamics of adaptation: Marked seasonality led to genetic differentiation within the population to different...

Data from: Location-specific cuticular hydrocarbon signals in a social insect

Qike Wang, Jason Q. D. Goodger, Ian E. Woodrow & Mark A. Elgar
Social insects use cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) to convey different social signals, including colony or nest identity. Despite extensive investigations, the exact source and identity of CHCs that act as nest-specific identification signals remain largely unknown. Perhaps this is because studies that identify CHC signals typically use organic solvents to extract a single sample from the entire animal, thereby analysing a cocktail of chemicals that may serve several signal functions. We took a novel approach by...

Data from: Congruent patterns of connectivity can inform management for broadcast spawning corals on the Great Barrier Reef

Lukoschek Vimoksalehi, Cynthia Riginos, Madeleine J.H. Van Oppen, Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen & Vimoksalehi Lukoschek
Connectivity underpins the persistence and recovery of marine ecosystems. The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is the world's largest coral reef ecosystem and managed by an extensive network of no-take zones; however, information about connectivity was not available to optimize the network's configuration. We use multivariate analyses, Bayesian clustering algorithms and assignment tests of the largest population genetic data set for any organism on the GBR to date (Acropora tenuis, >2500 colonies; >50 reefs, genotyped for...

Data from: Geographic variation in hybridization and ecological differentiation between three syntopic, morphologically similar species of montane lizards

Margaret L. Haines, Jane Melville, Joanna Sumner, Nick Clemann, David G. Chapple & Devi Stuart-Fox
To understand factors shaping species boundaries in closely related taxa, a powerful approach is to compare levels of genetic admixture at multiple points of contact and determine how this relates to intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic, morphological and ecological differentiation. In the Australian Alps, the threatened alpine bog skink Pseudemoia cryodroma co-occurs with two morphologically and ecologically similar congeners, P. entrecasteauxii and P. pagenstecheri, and all three species are suspected to hybridize. We...

Data from: Large-scale, multi-directional larval connectivity among coral reef fish populations in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park

David H. Williamson, Hugo B. Harrison, Glenn R. Almany, Michael L. Berumen, Michael Bode, Mary C. Bonin, Severine Choukroun, Peter J. Doherty, Ashley J. Frisch, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo & Geoffrey P. Jones
Larval dispersal is the key process by which populations of most marine fishes and invertebrates are connected and replenished. Advances in larval tagging and genetics have enhanced our capacity to track larval dispersal, assess scales of population connectivity, and quantify larval exchange among no-take marine reserves and fished areas. Recent studies have found that reserves can be a significant source of recruits for populations up to 40 km away, but the scale and direction of...

Data from: Ornament size and colour as alternative strategies for effective communication in gliding lizards

Danielle A. Klomp, Terry Ord, Indraneil Das, Arvin Diesmos, Norhayati Ahmad, Devi Stuart-Fox & T. J. Ord
Sexual ornamentation needs to be conspicuous to be effective in attracting potential mates and defending territories and indeed, a multitude of ways exists to achieve this. Two principal mechanisms for increasing conspicuousness are to increase the ornament's colour or brightness contrast against the background and to increase the size of the ornament. We assessed the relationship between the colour and size of the dewlap, a large extendible throat-fan, across a range of species of gliding...

Data from: The DNA of coral reef biodiversity: predicting and protecting genetic diversity of reef assemblages

Kimberly A. Selkoe, Oscar E. Gaggiotti, Eric A. Treml, Mary K. Donovan, Hawaii Reef Connectivity Consortium, Robert J. Toonen & Johanna L. K. Wren
Conservation of ecological communities requires deepening our understanding of genetic diversity patterns and drivers at community-wide scales. Here we use seascape genetic analysis of a diversity metric, allelic richness, for 47 reef species sampled across 13 Hawaiian Islands to empirically demonstrate that large reefs high in coral cover harbor the greatest genetic diversity on average. We found that a species’ life history (e.g., depth range and herbivory) mediates response of genetic diversity to seascape drivers...

Data from: Extensive variation, but not local adaptation in an Australian alpine daisy

Megan J. Hirst, Jason P. Sexton & Ary A. Hoffmann
Alpine plants often occupy diverse habitats within a similar elevation range, but most research on local adaptation in these plants has focused on elevation gradients. In testing for habitat-related local adaptation, local effects on seed quality and initial plant growth should be considered in designs that encompass multiple populations and habitats. We tested for local adaptation across alpine habitats in a morphologically variable daisy species, Brachyscome decipiens, in the Bogong High Plains in Victoria, Australia....

Data from: Population structure and gene flow in the global pest, Helicoverpa armigera

Craig J. Anderson, Wee T. Tay, Angela McGaughran, Karl Gordon & Tom K. Walsh
Helicoverpa armigera is a major agricultural pest that is distributed across Europe, Asia, Africa and Australasia. This species is hypothesized to have spread to the Americas 1.5 million years ago, founding a population that is at present, a distinct species, Helicoverpa zea. In 2013, H. armigera was confirmed to have re-entered South America via Brazil and subsequently spread. The source of the recent incursion is unknown and population structure in H. armigera is poorly resolved,...

Data from: Sperm dispersal distances estimated by parentage analysis in a brooding scleractinian coral

Patricia Warner, Bette Willis, Madeleine Van Oppen, Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen, Patricia A. Warner & Bette L. Willis
Within populations of brooding sessile corals, sperm dispersal constitutes the mechanism by which gametes interact and mating occurs, and forms the first link in the network of processes that determine species-wide connectivity patterns. However, almost nothing is known about sperm dispersal for any internally fertilizing coral. In this study, we conducted a parentage analysis on coral larvae collected from an area of mapped colonies, in order to measure the distance sperm disperses for the first...

Data from: Cross-validation strategies for data with temporal, spatial, hierarchical, or phylogenetic structure

David R. Roberts, Volker Bahn, Simone Ciuti, Mark S. Boyce, Jane Elith, Gurutzeta Guillera-Arroita, Severin Hauenstein, José J. Lahoz-Monfort, Boris Schröder, Wilfried Thuiller, David I. Warton, Brendan A. Wintle, Florian Hartig & Carsten F. Dormann
Ecological data often show temporal, spatial, hierarchical (random effects), or phylogenetic structure. Modern statistical approaches are increasingly accounting for such dependencies. However, when performing cross-validation, these structures are regularly ignored, resulting in serious underestimation of predictive error. One cause for the poor performance of uncorrected (random) cross-validation, noted often by modellers, are dependence structures in the data that persist as dependence structures in model residuals, violating the assumption of independence. Even more concerning, because often...

Data from: The genetic basis of discrete and quantitative colour variation in the polymorphic lizard, Ctenophorus decresii

Katrina J. Rankin, Claire A. McLean, Darrell J. Kemp & Devi Stuart-Fox
Background: Colour polymorphic species provide invaluable insight into processes that generate and maintain intra-specific variation. Despite an increasing understanding of the genetic basis of discrete morphs, sources of colour variation within morphs remain poorly understood. Here we use the polymorphic tawny dragon lizard Ctenophorus decresii to test simple Mendelian models for the inheritance of discrete morphs, and to investigate the genetic basis of continuous variation among individuals across morphs. Males of this species express either...

Data from: Behavioural response to combined insecticide and temperature stress in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster

Alexandre Fournier-Level, Adina Neumann-Mondlak, Robert T. Good, Llewellyn M. Green, Joshua M. Schmidt & Charles Robin
Insecticide resistance evolves extremely rapidly, providing an illuminating model for the study of adaptation. With climate change reshaping species distribution, pest and disease vector control needs rethinking to include the effects of environmental variation and insect stress physiology. Here we assessed how both long term adaptation of populations to temperature and immediate temperature variation affects the genetic architecture of DDT insecticide response in Drosophila melanogaster. Mortality assays and behavioral assays based on continuous activity monitoring...

Data from: Translocation strategies for multiple species depend on interspecific interaction type

Michaela Plein, Michael Bode, Melinda L. Moir & Peter A. Vesk
Conservation translocations – anthropogenic movements of species to prevent their extinction – have increased substantially over the last few decades. Although multiple species are frequently moved to the same location, current translocation guidelines consider species in isolation. This practice ignores important interspecific interactions, and thereby risks translocation failure. We model three different two-species systems to illustrate the inherent complexity of multi-species translocations, and to assess the influence of different interaction types (consumer-resource, mutualism, and competition)...

Data from: The influence of herbivores on primary producers can vary spatially and interact with disturbance

Paul E. Carnell & Michael J. Keough
Identifying the major drivers of ecosystem change remains a central area of ecological research. Although top–down drivers of change have received particular focus, we still have little understanding of how consistently these factors control an ecosystem's shift in both directions, between different ecosystem states. Using a crossed experiment in a shallow embayment in southeastern Australia, we investigated the roles of disturbance (kelp removal) and sea urchin herbivory (via increased density) to determine their contributions to...

Data from: Exploring the in meso crystallization mechanism by characterizing the lipid mesophase microenvironment during the growth of single transmembrane α-helical peptide crystals

, Konstantin Knoblich, Shane A. Seabrook, Nigel M. Kirby, Stephen T. Mudie, Deborah Lau, Xu Li, Sally L. Gras, Xavier Mulet, Matthew E. Call, Melissa J. Call, Calum J. Drummond & Charlotte E. Conn
The proposed mechanism for in meso crystallisation of transmembrane proteins suggests that a protein or peptide is initially uniformly dispersed in the lipid self-assembly cubic phase but that crystals grow from a local lamellar phase, which acts as a conduit between the crystal and the bulk cubic phase. However, there is very limited experimental evidence for this theory. We have developed protocols to investigate the lipid mesophase microenvironment during crystal growth using standard procedures readily...

Data from: From resource to female defence: the impact of roosting ecology on a bat's mating strategy

Linus Günther, Marlena D. Lopez, Mirjam Knörnschild, Kyle Reid, Martina Nagy & Frieder Mayer
With their extraordinary species richness and diversity in ecological traits and social systems, bats are a promising taxon for testing socio-ecological hypotheses in order to get new insights into the evolution of animal social systems. Regarding its roosting habits, proboscis bats form an extreme by occupying sites which are usually completely exposed to daylight (e.g. tree trunks, vines or rocks). This is accompanied by morphological and behavioural adaptations to remain cryptic in exposed day roosts....

Data from: Identification and qualification of 500 nuclear, single-copy, orthologous genes for the Eupulmonata (Gastropoda) using transcriptome sequencing and exon capture

Luisa C. Teasdale, Frank Köhler, Kevin D. Murray, Tim O'Hara & Adnan Moussalli
The qualification of orthology is a significant challenge when developing large, multiloci phylogenetic data sets from assembled transcripts. Transcriptome assemblies have various attributes, such as fragmentation, frameshifts and mis-indexing, which pose problems to automated methods of orthology assessment. Here, we identify a set of orthologous single-copy genes from transcriptome assemblies for the land snails and slugs (Eupulmonata) using a thorough approach to orthology determination involving manual alignment curation, gene tree assessment and sequencing from genomic...

Data from: Incest avoidance, extrapair paternity, and territory quality drive divorce in a year-round territorial bird.

Nataly Hidalgo Aranzamendi, Michelle L. Hall, Sjouke A. Kingma, Paul Sunnucks & Anne Peters
Divorce can be an important behavioral strategy to improve fitness. This is particularly relevant for species that are territorial year-round with continuous partnerships, where individuals face constraints on partner choice due to limited vacancies and dispersal opportunities. We tested several hypotheses for divorce in such a species, the cooperatively breeding bird Malurus coronatus. Based on 9 years of detailed information on dispersal and survival of 317 breeding pairs, we tested whether divorce is driven by...

Data from: Who is spreading avian influenza in the moving duck flock farming network of Indonesia?

Joerg Henning, Dirk U. Pfeiffer, Mark Stevenson, Didik Yulianto, Walujo Priyono & Joanne Meers
Duck populations are considered to be a reservoir of Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus H5N1 in some agricultural production systems, as they are able to shed the virus for several days without clinical signs. Countries endemically affected with HPAI in Asia are characterised by production systems where ducks are fed on post-harvest spilled rice. During this scavenging process it is common for ducks to come into contact with other duck flocks or wild birds,...

Data from: Persistence of a Wolbachia infection frequency cline in Drosophila melanogaster and the possible role of reproductive dormancy

Peter Kriesner, William R. Conner, Andrew R. Weeks, Michael Turelli & Ary A. Hoffmann
Field populations of arthropods are often polymorphic for Wolbachia but the factors maintaining intermediate Wolbachia frequencies are generally not understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, Wolbachia frequencies are highly variable across the globe. We document the persistence of a Wolbachia infection frequency cline in D. melanogaster populations from eastern Australia across at least 20 years, with frequencies generally high in the tropics but lower in cool temperate regions. The results are interpreted using a model of frequency...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    39

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    39

Affiliations

  • University of Melbourne
    39
  • Monash University
    4
  • University of Queensland
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • UNSW Sydney
    3
  • Australian Institute of Marine Science
    3
  • James Cook University
    3
  • National University of Malaysia
    2
  • Deakin University
    2
  • Museum Victoria
    2