39 Works

Data from: Local endemism and within-island diversification of shrews illustrate the importance of speciation in building Sundaland mammal diversity

Terrence C. Demos, Anang S. Achmadi, Thomas C. Giarla, Heru Handika, , Kevin C. Rowe & Jacob A. Esselstyn
Island systems are important models for evolutionary biology because they provide convenient, discrete biogeographic units of study. Continental islands with a history of intermittent dry land connections confound the discrete definitions of islands and have led zoologists to predict (1) little differentiation of terrestrial organisms among continental shelf islands and (2) extinction, rather than speciation, to be the main cause of differences in community composition among islands. However, few continental island systems have been subjected...

Data from: Landscape genomics reveals altered genome wide diversity within revegetated stands of Eucalyptus microcarpa (Grey Box)

Rebecca Jordan, Shannon K. Dillon, Suzanne M. Prober & Ary A. Hoffmann
In order to contribute to evolutionary resilience and adaptive potential in highly modified landscapes, revegetated areas should ideally reflect levels of genetic diversity within and across natural stands. Landscape genomic analyses enable such diversity patterns to be characterized at genome and chromosomal levels. Landscape-wide patterns of genomic diversity were assessed in Eucalyptus microcarpa, a dominant tree species widely used in revegetation in Southeastern Australia. Trees from small and large patches within large remnants, small isolated...

Data from: An antibody screen of a Plasmodium vivax antigen library identifies novel merozoite proteins associated with clinical protection

Camila T. França, Jessica B. Hostetler, Sumana Sharma, Michael T. White, Enmoore Lin, Benson Kiniboro, Andreea Waltmann, Andrew W. Darcy, Connie S. Li Wai Suen, Peter Siba, Christopher L. King, Julian C. Rayner, Rick M. Fairhurst, Ivo Mueller & Connie S. N. Li Wai Suen
Background. Elimination of Plasmodium vivax malaria would be greatly facilitated by the development of an effective vaccine. A comprehensive and systematic characterization of antibodies to P. vivax antigens in exposed populations is useful in guiding rational vaccine design. Methodology/Principal Findings. In this study, we investigated antibodies to a large library of P. vivax entire ectodomain merozoite proteins in 2 Asia-Pacific populations, analysing the relationship of antibody levels with markers of current and cumulative malaria exposure,...

Data from: Revisiting the measurement of anomie

Ali Teymoori, Jolanda Jetten, Brock Bastian, Amarina Ariyanto, Frédérique Autin, Nadia Ayub, Constantina Badea, Tomasz Besta, Fabrizio Butera, Rui Costa-Lopes, Lijuan Cui, Carole Fantini, Gillian Finchilesc, Lowell Gaertner, Mario Gollwitzer, Ángel Gómez, Roberto González, Ying Yi Hong, Dorthe Høj Jensen, Minoru Karasawa, Thomas Kessler, Olivier Klein, Marcus Lima, Tuuli Anna Mähönen, Laura Megevand … & Gillian Finchilescu
Sociologists coined the term "anomie" to describe societies that are characterized by disintegration and deregulation. Extending beyond conceptualizations of anomie that conflate the measurements of anomie as 'a state of society' and as a 'state of mind', we disentangle these conceptualizations and develop an analysis and measure of this phenomenon focusing on anomie as a perception of the 'state of society'. We propose that anomie encompasses two dimensions: a perceived breakdown in social fabric (i.e.,...

Data from: Correlates of extinction risk in squamate reptiles: the relative importance of biology, geography, threat and range size

Monika Böhm, Rhiannon Williams, Huw R. Bramhall, Kirsten M. McMillan, Ana D. Davidson, Andrés Garcia, Lucie M. Bland, Jon Bielby & Ben Collen
Aim Evaluating the relative roles of biological traits and environmental factors that predispose species to an elevated risk of extinction is of fundamental importance to macroecology. Identifying species that possess extinction-promoting traits allows targeted conservation action before precipitous declines occur. Such analyses have been carried out for several vertebrate groups, with the notable exception of reptiles. We identify traits correlating with high extinction risk in squamate reptiles, assess whether these differ with geography, taxonomy and...

Data from: Concordance in evolutionary history of threatened plant and insect populations warrant unified conservation management approaches

Melinda L. Moir, David J. Coates, W. Jason Kennington, Sarah Barrett, Gary S. Taylor & W. Jason Kensington
Threatened organisms may act as host to a suite of dependent organisms, which are potentially cothreatened, yet management is rarely coordinated between host and dependent species. Here, we test the congruency of patterns of genetic structure between two critically endangered interacting taxa; the feather-leaf banksia (Banksia brownii R.Br.), and its host-specific herbivorous plant-louse Trioza barrettae Taylor & Moir, to establish whether conservation actions should be implemented jointly for both species. We also examine the role...

Data from: How do different aspects of biodiversity change through time? A case study on an Australian bird community

Jian D. L. Yen, James R. Thomson, Jonathan M. Keith, David M. Paganin & Ralph Mac Nally
The study of ecological communities through time can reveal fundamental ecological processes and is key to understanding how natural and human pressures will affect biodiversity. Most studies of ecological communities through time consider only one or a few summary measures (e.g. species richness, total abundance), which might neglect important aspects of community structure or function. We studied temporal variation in several measures of species diversity, size diversity, and species composition in an intensively sampled bird...

Data from: Woodstoich III: integrating tools of nutritional geometry and ecological stoichiometry to advance nutrient budgeting and the prediction of consumer-driven nutrient recycling

Erik Sperfeld, Halvor M. Halvorson, Matthew Malishev, Fiona J. Clissold & Nicole D. Wagner
Within the last two decades, ecological stoichiometry (ES) and nutritional geometry (NG, also known as geometric framework for nutrition) have delivered novel insights into core questions of nutritional ecology. These two nutritionally explicit frameworks differ in the ‘nutrient currency’ used and the focus of their past research; behavioural feeding strategies in NG, mainly investigating terrestrial organisms, and trophic ecology in ES, mainly in aquatic settings. However, both NG and ES have developed in explaining patterns...

Data from: Contrasting patterns of population connectivity between regions in a commercially important mollusc Haliotis rubra: integrating population genetics, genomics and marine LiDAR data

Adam Miller, Anthony Van Rooyen, Gordana Rasic, Daniel Ierodiaconou, Harry K. Gorfine, Robert Day, Caroline Wong, Ary A. Hoffmann & Andrew R. Weeks
Estimating contemporary genetic structure and population connectivity in marine species is challenging, often compromised by genetic markers that lack adequate sensitivity, and unstructured sampling regimes. We show how these limitations can be overcome via the integration of modern genotyping methods and sampling designs guided by LiDAR and SONAR data sets. Here we explore patterns of gene flow and local genetic structure in a commercially harvested abalone species (Haliotis rubra) from southeastern Australia, where the viability...

Data from: Scope for genetic rescue of an endangered subspecies though re-establishing natural gene flow with another subspecies

Katherine A. Harrisson, Alexandra Pavlova, Anders Gonçalves Da Silva, Rebecca Rose, James K. Bull, Melanie L. Lancaster, Neil Murray, Bruce Quin, Peter Menkhorst, Michael J. Magrath, Paul Sunnucks & Michael J. L. Magrath
Genetic diversity is positively linked to the viability and evolutionary potential of species but is often compromised in threatened taxa. Genetic rescue by gene flow from a more diverse or differentiated source population of the same species can be an effective strategy for alleviating inbreeding depression and boosting evolutionary potential. The helmeted honeyeater Lichenostomus melanops cassidix is a critically endangered subspecies of the common yellow-tufted honeyeater. Cassidix has declined to a single wild population of...

Data from: Nonlinear scaling of foraging contacts with rodent population density

Benny Borremans, Jonas Reijniers, Nelika K. Hughes, Stephanie S. Godfrey, Sophie Gryseels, Rhodes H. Makundi & Herwig Leirs
Density-dependent shifts in population processes like territoriality, reproduction, dispersal, and parasite transmission are driven by changes in contacts between individuals. Despite this, surprisingly little is known about how contacts change with density, and thus the mechanisms driving density-dependent processes. A simple linear contact-density function is often assumed, but this is not based on a sound basis of empirical data. We addressed this question using a replicated, semi-natural experiment in which we measured contacts at feeding...

Data from: A fresh approach reveals how dispersal shapes metacommunity structure in a human-altered landscape

Barbara J. Downes, Jill Lancaster, Alena Glaister & William D. Bovill
To understand species losses from disturbed landscapes, it is important to distinguish the effects of degraded environmental conditions from those caused by barriers to dispersal between habitat patches. To assess the relative importance of these effects, we developed a new approach using permutation and association tests applied to rank abundance data, using the invertebrate fauna of two rivers in two seasons. Our study streams were Hughes Creek and Seven Creeks, in south-eastern Australia, which have...

Data from: Detecting copper toxicity in sediments: from the sub-individual level to the population level

Katherine J. Jeppe, Jianghua Yang, Sara M. Long, Melissa E. Carew, Xiaowei Zhang, Vincent Pettigrove & Ary A. Hoffmann
1.Sediments accumulate chemicals that can be toxic to biota and often contribute to aquatic ecosystem decline. Measuring mortality in laboratory-bred organisms is a common way to assess sediment toxicity. However, mortality-based responses of resilient laboratory organisms may not reflect indigenous macroinvertebrate responses, which can be relatively more sensitive to sediment toxicants. A possible solution is to also measure responses at the sub-individual level. 2.Several organism responses to sediment copper toxicity were assessed in a field-based...

Data from: Manipulating wetland hydroperiod to improve occupancy rates by an endangered amphibian: modelling management scenarios

Andrew J. Hamer, Geoff W. Heard, Jake Urlus, Jonathon Ricciardello, Bernadette Schmidt, Darren Quin, William K. Steele & Geoffrey W. Heard
Environmental managers have the difficult task of ensuring species persistence despite considerable uncertainty about their response to management. Spatially explicit population models provide one solution for simulating the dynamics of species and evaluating alternative management regimes. We used a Bayesian model to investigate wetland occupancy dynamics of the endangered growling grass frog Litoria raniformis at a wastewater treatment plant in southern Victoria, Australia. We coupled prior information from earlier research on this species with our...

Data from: Tropical Drosophila pandora carry Wolbachia infections causing cytoplasmic incompatibility or male killing

Kelly M. Richardson, Michele Schiffer, Philippa C. Griffin, Siu F. Lee & Ary A. Hoffmann
Wolbachia infections have been described in several Drosophila species, but relatively few have been assessed for phenotypic effects. Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is the most common phenotypic effect that has been detected, while some infections cause male killing or feminization, and many Wolbachia infections have few host effects. Here, we describe two new infections in a recently described species, Drosophila pandora, one of which causes near-complete CI and near-perfect maternal transmission (the “CI” strain). The other...

Data from: The effect of egg size on hatch time and metabolic rate: theoretical and empirical insights on developing insect embryos

James L. Maino, Elia I. Pirtle & Michael R. Kearney
Body size scaling relationships allow biologists to study ecological phenomena in terms of individual level metabolic processes. Recently, dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory has been shown to offer novel insights on the effect of body size on biological rates. We test whether DEB theory and its unique partitioning of biomass into reserve and structural components can explain the effect of egg size on hatch time and the time course of respiration in insect embryos. We...

Data from: Incest avoidance, extrapair paternity, and territory quality drive divorce in a year-round territorial bird.

Nataly Hidalgo Aranzamendi, Michelle L. Hall, Sjouke A. Kingma, Paul Sunnucks & Anne Peters
Divorce can be an important behavioral strategy to improve fitness. This is particularly relevant for species that are territorial year-round with continuous partnerships, where individuals face constraints on partner choice due to limited vacancies and dispersal opportunities. We tested several hypotheses for divorce in such a species, the cooperatively breeding bird Malurus coronatus. Based on 9 years of detailed information on dispersal and survival of 317 breeding pairs, we tested whether divorce is driven by...

Data from: Translocation strategies for multiple species depend on interspecific interaction type

Michaela Plein, Michael Bode, Melinda L. Moir & Peter A. Vesk
Conservation translocations – anthropogenic movements of species to prevent their extinction – have increased substantially over the last few decades. Although multiple species are frequently moved to the same location, current translocation guidelines consider species in isolation. This practice ignores important interspecific interactions, and thereby risks translocation failure. We model three different two-species systems to illustrate the inherent complexity of multi-species translocations, and to assess the influence of different interaction types (consumer-resource, mutualism, and competition)...

Data from: The genetic basis of discrete and quantitative colour variation in the polymorphic lizard, Ctenophorus decresii

Katrina J. Rankin, Claire A. McLean, Darrell J. Kemp & Devi Stuart-Fox
Background: Colour polymorphic species provide invaluable insight into processes that generate and maintain intra-specific variation. Despite an increasing understanding of the genetic basis of discrete morphs, sources of colour variation within morphs remain poorly understood. Here we use the polymorphic tawny dragon lizard Ctenophorus decresii to test simple Mendelian models for the inheritance of discrete morphs, and to investigate the genetic basis of continuous variation among individuals across morphs. Males of this species express either...

Data from: Who is spreading avian influenza in the moving duck flock farming network of Indonesia?

Joerg Henning, Dirk U. Pfeiffer, Mark Stevenson, Didik Yulianto, Walujo Priyono & Joanne Meers
Duck populations are considered to be a reservoir of Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus H5N1 in some agricultural production systems, as they are able to shed the virus for several days without clinical signs. Countries endemically affected with HPAI in Asia are characterised by production systems where ducks are fed on post-harvest spilled rice. During this scavenging process it is common for ducks to come into contact with other duck flocks or wild birds,...

Data from: Persistence of a Wolbachia infection frequency cline in Drosophila melanogaster and the possible role of reproductive dormancy

Peter Kriesner, William R. Conner, Andrew R. Weeks, Michael Turelli & Ary A. Hoffmann
Field populations of arthropods are often polymorphic for Wolbachia but the factors maintaining intermediate Wolbachia frequencies are generally not understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, Wolbachia frequencies are highly variable across the globe. We document the persistence of a Wolbachia infection frequency cline in D. melanogaster populations from eastern Australia across at least 20 years, with frequencies generally high in the tropics but lower in cool temperate regions. The results are interpreted using a model of frequency...

Data from: From resource to female defence: the impact of roosting ecology on a bat's mating strategy

Linus Günther, Marlena D. Lopez, Mirjam Knörnschild, Kyle Reid, Martina Nagy & Frieder Mayer
With their extraordinary species richness and diversity in ecological traits and social systems, bats are a promising taxon for testing socio-ecological hypotheses in order to get new insights into the evolution of animal social systems. Regarding its roosting habits, proboscis bats form an extreme by occupying sites which are usually completely exposed to daylight (e.g. tree trunks, vines or rocks). This is accompanied by morphological and behavioural adaptations to remain cryptic in exposed day roosts....

Data from: Sperm dispersal distances estimated by parentage analysis in a brooding scleractinian coral

Patricia Warner, Bette Willis, Madeleine Van Oppen, Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen, Patricia A. Warner & Bette L. Willis
Within populations of brooding sessile corals, sperm dispersal constitutes the mechanism by which gametes interact and mating occurs, and forms the first link in the network of processes that determine species-wide connectivity patterns. However, almost nothing is known about sperm dispersal for any internally fertilizing coral. In this study, we conducted a parentage analysis on coral larvae collected from an area of mapped colonies, in order to measure the distance sperm disperses for the first...

Data from: The influence of herbivores on primary producers can vary spatially and interact with disturbance

Paul E. Carnell & Michael J. Keough
Identifying the major drivers of ecosystem change remains a central area of ecological research. Although top–down drivers of change have received particular focus, we still have little understanding of how consistently these factors control an ecosystem's shift in both directions, between different ecosystem states. Using a crossed experiment in a shallow embayment in southeastern Australia, we investigated the roles of disturbance (kelp removal) and sea urchin herbivory (via increased density) to determine their contributions to...

Data from: Exploring the in meso crystallization mechanism by characterizing the lipid mesophase microenvironment during the growth of single transmembrane α-helical peptide crystals

, Konstantin Knoblich, Shane A. Seabrook, Nigel M. Kirby, Stephen T. Mudie, Deborah Lau, Xu Li, Sally L. Gras, Xavier Mulet, Matthew E. Call, Melissa J. Call, Calum J. Drummond & Charlotte E. Conn
The proposed mechanism for in meso crystallisation of transmembrane proteins suggests that a protein or peptide is initially uniformly dispersed in the lipid self-assembly cubic phase but that crystals grow from a local lamellar phase, which acts as a conduit between the crystal and the bulk cubic phase. However, there is very limited experimental evidence for this theory. We have developed protocols to investigate the lipid mesophase microenvironment during crystal growth using standard procedures readily...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    39

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    39

Affiliations

  • University of Melbourne
    39
  • Monash University
    4
  • University of Queensland
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • UNSW Sydney
    3
  • Australian Institute of Marine Science
    3
  • James Cook University
    3
  • National University of Malaysia
    2
  • Deakin University
    2
  • Museum Victoria
    2