53 Works

Data from: Differentiating founder and chronic HIV envelope sequences

John M. Murray, Stephen Maher, Talia Mota, Kazuo Suzuki, Anthony D. Kelleher, Rob J. Center & Damian Purcell
Significant progress has been made in characterizing broadly neutralizing antibodies against the HIV envelope glycoprotein Env, but an effective vaccine has proven elusive. Vaccine development would be facilitated if common features of early founder virus required for transmission could be identified. Here we employ a combination of bioinformatic and operations research methods to determine the most prevalent features that distinguish 78 subtype B and 55 subtype C founder Env sequences from an equal number of...

Data from: Landscape context explains changes in the functional diversity of regenerating forests better than climate or species richness

Michael Sams, Hao Ran Lai, Stephen Bonser, Peter Vesk, Robert Kooyman, Daniel Metcalfe, John W. Morgan, Margaret Mayfield, M. A. Sams, D. J. Metcalfe, R. M. Kooyman & P. A. Vesk
Aim A rich literature on forest succession provides general expectations for the steps forests go through while reassembling after disturbance, yet we still have a surprisingly poor understanding of why the outcomes of forest recovery after logging (or other disturbances) vary so extensively. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that regional species pool, system productivity, climate and landscape structure are important drivers of forest reassembly outcomes. Location Transect 1,500 km in length along the...

Data from: Optimal nutrient exchange and immune responses operate in partner specificity in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis

Jennifer L. Matthews, Camerron M. Crowder, Clinton A. Oakley, Adrian Lutz, Ute Roessner, Eli Meyer, Arthur R. Grossman, Virginia M. Weis & Simon K. Davy
The relationship between reef-building corals and phototrophic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium is fundamental to the functioning of coral reef ecosystems. It has been suggested that reef corals may adapt to climate change by changing their dominant symbiont type to a more thermally tolerant one, although the capacity for such a community shift is potentially hindered by the compatibility of different host-symbiont pairings. Here we combined transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to characterize the molecular, cellular,...

Data from: Cryptic lineage diversity, body size divergence and sympatry in a species complex of Australian lizards (Gehyra)

Craig C. Moritz, Renae C. Pratt, Sarah Bank, Gayleen Bourke, Jason G. Bragg, Paul Doughty, J. Scott Keogh, Rebecca J. Laver, Sally Potter, Luisa C. Teasdale, Leonardo G. Tedeschi & Paul M. Oliver
Understanding the joint evolutionary and ecological underpinnings of sympatry among close relatives remains a key challenge in biology. This problem can be addressed through joint phylogenomic and phenotypic analysis of complexes of closely related lineages within, and across, species and hence representing the speciation continuum. For a complex of tropical geckos from northern Australia – Gehyra nana and close relatives – we combine mtDNA phylogeography, exon-capture sequencing and morphological data to resolve independently evolving lineages...

Data from: High-productivity vegetation is important for lessening bird declines during prolonged drought

Katherine E. Selwood, Melodie A. McGeoch, Rohan H. Clarke & Ralph Mac Nally
1.Locations in which ecological assemblages show high resistance to climate pressures, such as drought, are likely to be important refuges for biota in changing climates. We asked whether environmental characteristics of locations were associated with the capacity of bird assemblages to withstand prolonged drought. 2.We used a multi-species index to quantify trends in bird assemblages during a 13-year drought at >500 locations (>18,000 surveys) in the Murray-Darling Basin, south eastern Australia, using data from the...

Data from: Evidence of genomic adaptation to climate in Eucalyptus microcarpa: implications for adaptive potential to projected climate change

Rebecca Jordan, Ary A. Hoffmann, Shannon K. Dillon & Suzanne M. Prober
Understanding whether populations can adapt in situ or whether interventions are required is of key importance for biodiversity management under climate change. Landscape genomics is becoming an increasingly important and powerful tool for rapid assessments of climate adaptation, especially in long-lived species such as trees. We investigated climate adaptation in Eucalyptus microcarpa using the DArTseq genomic approach. A combination of FST outlier and environmental association analyses were performed using > 4,200 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms...

Data from: Naturally acquired antibody responses to more than 300 Plasmodium vivax proteins in three geographic regions

Rhea J. Longley, Michael T. White, Eizo Takashima, Masayuki Morita, Bernard N. Kanoi, Connie S. N. Li Wai Suen, Inoni Betuela, Andrea Kuehn, Piyarat Sripoorote, Camila T. Franca, Peter Siba, Leanne J. Robinson, Marcus Lacerda, Jetsumon Sattabongkot, Takafumi Tsuboi & Ivo Mueller
Plasmodium vivax remains an important cause of malaria in South America and the Asia-Pacific. Naturally acquired antibody responses against multiple P. vivax proteins have been described in numerous countries, however, direct comparison of these responses has been difficult with different methodologies employed. We measured antibody responses against 307 P. vivax proteins at the time of P. vivax infection, and at 2–3 later time-points in three countries. We observed that seropositivity rates at the time of...

Data from: Temperature-regulated guest admission and release in microporous materials

Gang Kevin Li, Jin Shang, Qinfen Gu, Rohan V. Awati, Nathan Jensen, Andrew Grant, Xueying Zhang, David S. Sholl, Jefferson Z. Liu, Paul A. Webley & Eric F. May
While it has long been known that some highly adsorbing microporous materials suddenly become inaccessible to guest molecules below certain temperatures, previous attempts to explain this phenomenon have failed. Here we show that this anomalous sorption behaviour is a temperature-regulated guest admission process, where the pore-keeping group’s thermal fluctuations are influenced by interactions with guest molecules. A physical model is presented to explain the atomic-level chemistry and structure of these thermally regulated micropores, which is...

Data from: Pleistocene climatic changes drive diversification across a tropical savanna

Sally Potter, Alexander T. Xue, Jason G. Bragg, Dan F. Rosauer, Emily J. Roycroft & Craig Moritz
Spatial responses of species to past climate change depend on both intrinsic traits (climatic niche breadth, dispersal rates) and the scale of climatic fluctuations across the landscape. New capabilities in generating and analysing population genomic data, along with spatial modelling, have unleashed our capacity to infer how past climate changes have shaped populations, and by extension, complex communities. Combining these approaches, we uncover lineage diversity across four co-distributed lizards from the Australian Monsoonal Tropics and...

Data from: Different genetic structures revealed resident populations of a specialist parasitoid wasp in contrast to its migratory host

Shu-Jun Wei, Yuan Zhou, Xu-Lei Fan, Ary A. Hoffmann, Li-Jun Cao, Xue-Xin Chen & Zai-Fu Xu
Genetic comparisons of parasitoids and their hosts are expected to reflect ecological and evolutionary processes that influence the interactions between species. The parasitoid wasp, Cotesia vestalis, and its host diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, provide opportunities to test whether the specialist natural enemy migrates seasonally with its host or occurs as resident population. We genotyped 17 microsatellite loci and two mitochondrial genes for 158 female adults of C. vestalis collected from 12 geographical populations, as...

Data from: Single and multiple mating reduces longevity of female dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica)

Amanda M. Franklin & Devi Stuart-Fox
For many species, mating is a necessary yet costly activity. The costs involved can have an important influence on the evolution of life histories and senescence. Females of many species mate multiply and this behaviour can inflict a longevity cost. Most studies investigating the effects of multiple mating on female survival have been conducted on insects and the effects in other taxa are largely unknown. We investigate the effects of both a single mating and...

Mammal detection data for the SAFE project site, Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, 2015 [HMTF]

N.J. Deere, G. Guillera-Arroita, E.L. Baking, H. Bernard, M. Pfeifer, G. Reynolds, O.R. Wearn, Z.G. Davies & M.J. Struebig
This data set contains stacked detection matrices for 28 recorded mammal species across 115 sampling locations at the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) project site located in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Information for each camera trap sampling location, including spatial information and sampling effort is included. Data were collected in order to determine the contribution of carbon-based policies to biodiversity conservation in agricultural land-use mosaics. These data are essential to the development of the occupancy...

Data from: Are trait-growth models transferable? Predicting multi-species growth trajectories between ecosystems using plant functional traits

Freya M. Thomas & Peter A. Vesk
Plant functional traits are increasingly used to generalize across species, however few examples exist of predictions from trait-based models being evaluated in new species or new places. Can we use functional traits to predict growth of unknown species in different areas? We used three independently collected datasets, each containing data on heights of individuals from non-resprouting species over a chronosquence of time-since-fire sites from three ecosystems in south-eastern Australia. We examined the influence of specific...

Data from: Enhancing plant diversity in a novel grassland using seed addition

Tara J. Zamin, Alex Jolly, Steve Sinclair, John W. Morgan & Joslin L. Moore
1.Restoration of novel ecosystems to a historical benchmark may not always be possible or advisable. Novel ecosystems may be managed by targeting specific components and accepting the novelty of other ecosystem attributes. The feasibility of this component-wise management of novel ecosystems has rarely been tested. 2.In a novel grassland, where C3 grasses have replaced C4 grasses, nutrients have been elevated, and diversity has been lost due to a history of agricultural land use, we aimed...

Data from: Can collective memories shape fish distributions? A test, linking space-time occurrence models and population demographics

Jed I. Macdonald, Kai Logemann, Elias T. Krainski, Þorsteinn Sigurðsson, Colin M. Beale, Geir Huse, Solfrid S. Hjøllo & Guðrún Marteinsdóttir
Social learning can be fundamental to cohesive group living, and schooling fishes have proven ideal test subjects for recent work in this field. For many species, both demographic factors, and inter- (and intra-) generational information exchange are considered vital ingredients in how movement decisions are reached. Yet key information is often missing on the spatial outcomes of such decisions, and questions concerning how migratory traditions are influenced by collective memory, density-dependent and density-independent processes remain...

Data from: Testing the niche breadth-range size hypothesis: habitat specialization versus performance in Australian alpine daisies

Megan J. Hirst, Philippa C. Griffin, Jason P. Sexton & Ary A. Hoffmann
Relatively common species within a clade are expected to perform well across a wider range of conditions than their rarer relatives, yet experimental tests of this “niche breadth—range size” hypothesis remain surprisingly scarce. Rarity may arise due to trade-offs between specialization and performance across a wide range of environments. Here we use common garden and reciprocal transplant experiments to test the niche breadth—range size hypothesis, focusing on four common and three rare endemic alpine daisies...

Data from: Ecological opportunity and ecomorphological convergence in Australasian robins (Petroicidae)

Vicente García-Navas, Marta Rodriguez-Rey & Les Christidis
Ecological theories of adaptive radiation predict that ecological opportunity (EO) stimulates cladogenesis through entry into a novel environment and/or release of competition pressures. Due to its dynamic paleoclimatic and geological history, the Australo-Papuan region constitutes an opportune scenario to study patterns of diversification in relation to the colonization of new ecological niches. Here, we employ a comparative framework using the Australasian robins (Petroicidae) as a model system to test whether the diversification of this bird...

Data from: Demographic collapse and low genetic diversity of the Irrawaddy dolphin population inhabiting the Mekong River

Michael Krützen, Isabel Beasley, Corinne Y. Ackermann, Dietmar Lieckfeldt, Arne Ludwig, Gerard E. Ryan, Lars Bejder, Guido J. Parra, Rebekka Wolfensberger & Peter B. S. Spencer
In threatened wildlife populations, it is important to determine whether observed low genetic diversity may be due to recent anthropogenic pressure or the consequence of historic events. Historical size of the Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris) population inhabiting the Mekong River is unknown and there is significant concern for long-term survival of the remaining population as a result of low abundance, slow reproduction rate, high neonatal mortality, and continuing anthropogenic threats. We investigated population structure and...

Data from: Effects of beneficial mutations in pykF gene vary over time and across replicate populations in a long-term experiment with bacteria

Fen Peng, Scott Widmann, Andrea Wunsche, Kristina Duan, Katherine A Donovan, Renwick C. J. Dobson, Richard E. Lenski & Tim F. Cooper
The fitness effects of mutations can depend on the genetic backgrounds in which they occur and thereby influence future opportunities for evolving populations. In particular, mutations that fix in a population might change the selective benefit of subsequent mutations, giving rise to historical contingency. We examine these effects by focusing on mutations in a key metabolic gene, pykF, that arose independently early in the history of 12 Escherichia coli populations during a long-term evolution experiment....

Data from: Survey design for precise fire management conservation targets

Holly Sitters, Julian Di Stefano, Timothy Wills, Matthew Swan & Alan York
Common goals of ecological fire management are to sustain biodiversity and minimize extinction risk. A novel approach to achieving these goals determines the relative proportions of vegetation growth stages (equivalent to successional stages, which are categorical representations of time since fire) that maximize a biodiversity index. The method combines data describing species abundances in each growth stage with numerical optimization to define an optimal growth-stage structure which provides a conservation-based operational target for managers. However,...

Data from: Distinct microbial communities in the active and permafrost layers on the Tibetan Plateau

Yongliang Chen, Ye Deng, Jinzhi Ding, Hangwei Hu, Tianle Xu, Fei Li, Guibiao Yang, Yuanhe Yang, Hang-Wei Hu, Gui-Biao Yang, Yuan-He Yang & Tian-Le Xu
Permafrost represents an important understudied genetic resource. Soil microorganisms play important roles in regulating biogeochemical cycles and maintaining ecosystem function. However, our knowledge of patterns and drivers of permafrost microbial communities is limited over broad geographic scales. Using high-throughput Illumina sequencing, this study compared soil bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities between the active and permafrost layers on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results indicated that microbial alpha diversity was significantly higher in the active layer than...

Data from: High monetary reward rates and caloric rewards decrease temporal persistence

Bowen J. Fung, Stefan Bode & Carsten Murawski
Temporal persistence refers to an individual's capacity to wait for future rewards, while forgoing possible alternatives. This requires a trade-off between the potential value of delayed rewards and opportunity costs, and is relevant to many real-world decisions, such as dieting. Theoretical models have previously suggested that high monetary reward rates, or positive energy balance, may result in decreased temporal persistence. In our study, 50 fasted participants engaged in a temporal persistence task, incentivised with monetary...

Data from: Assessing the sensitivity of biodiversity indices used to inform fire management

Katherine M. Giljohann, Luke T. Kelly, Jemima Connell, Michael F. Clarke, Rohan H. Clarke, Tracey J. Regan & Michael A. McCarthy
Biodiversity indices are widely used to summarise changes in the distribution and abundance of multiple species and measure progress towards management targets. However, the sensitivity of biodiversity indices to the data, landscape classification and conservation values underpinning them are rarely interrogated. There are limited studies to help scientists and land managers use biodiversity indices in the presence of fire and vegetation succession. The geometric mean of species’ relative abundance or occurrence (G) is a biodiversity...

High Carbon Stock stratification of the SAFE project site, Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, 2015 [HMTF]

N.J. Deere, G. Guillera-Arroita, E.L. Baking, H. Bernard, M. Pfeifer, G. Reynolds, O.R. Wearn, Z.G. Davies & M.J. Struebig
This data set provides a spatial stratification of forest cover into discrete vegetation classes according to the High Carbon Stock (HCS) Approach. The data set covers the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) project site located in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Data were collected in 2015 during a project which was included in the NERC Human-modified tropical forest (HMTF) programme.

Data from: A spatially integrated framework for assessing socioecological drivers of carnivore decline

Nicolás Gálvez, Gurutzeta Guillera-Arroita, Freya A. V. St. John, Elke Schüttler, David W. Macdonald & Zoe G. Davies
Habitat loss, fragmentation and degradation are key threats to the long-term persistence of carnivores, which are also susceptible to direct persecution by people. Integrating natural and social science methods to examine how habitat configuration/quality and human–predator relations may interact in space and time to effect carnivore populations within human-dominated landscapes will help prioritise conservation investment and action effectively. We propose a socioecological modelling framework to evaluate drivers of carnivore decline in landscapes where predators and...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    53

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    53

Affiliations

  • University of Melbourne
    53
  • Australian National University
    7
  • Monash University
    6
  • UNSW Sydney
    6
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    5
  • La Trobe University
    5
  • University of Kent
    3
  • Macquarie University
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3