9 Works

Analytic dataset informing prediction of subterranean cave and mine ambient temperatures

Meredith McClure, Daniel Crowley, Catherine Haase, Liam McGuire, Nathan Fuller, David Hayman, Cori Lausen, Raina Plowright, Brett Dickson & Sarah Olson
Caves and other subterranean features provide unique environments for many species. The importance of cave microclimate is particularly relevant at temperate latitudes where bats make seasonal use of caves for hibernation. White-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease that has devastated populations of hibernating bats across eastern and central North America, has brought renewed interest in bat hibernation and hibernaculum conditions. A recent review synthesized current understanding of cave climatology, exploring the qualitative relationship between cave...

Mountain goat molt from community photographs

Katarzyna Nowak, Shane Richards, Joel Berger, Amy Panikowski, Aerin Jacob, Donald Reid, Greg Newman, Nicholas Young & Jon Beckmann
Participatory approaches, such as community photography, can engage the public in questions of societal and scientific interest while helping advance understanding of ecological patterns and processes. We combined data extracted from community-sourced, spatially-explicit photographs with research findings from 2018 fieldwork in the Yukon, Canada, to evaluate winter coat molt patterns and phenology in mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), a cold-adapted, alpine mammal. Leveraging the community science portals iNaturalist and CitSci, in less than a year we...

Analytic dataset informing modeling of winter species distributions of North American bat species

Sarah Olson, Meredith McClure, Catherine Haase, Carter Hranac, David Hayman, Brett Dickson, Liam McGuire, Daniel Crowley, Nathan Fuller, Cori Lausen & Raina Plowright
The fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans and resultant white-nose syndrome (WNS) continues to advance across North America, infecting new bat populations, species, and hibernacula. Western North America hosts the highest bat diversity in the U.S. and Canada, yet little is known about hibernacula and hibernation behavior in this region. An improved understanding of where bats hibernate and the conditions that create suitable hibernacula is critical if land managers are to anticipate and address the conservation needs...

Data from: Prelude to a panzootic: gene flow and immunogenetic variation in northern little brown myotis vulnerable to bat white-nose syndrome

Christina M. Davy, Michael E. Donaldson, Yessica Rico, Cori L. Lausen, Kathleen Dogantzis, Kyle Ritchie, Craig K. R. Willis, Douglas W. Burles, Thomas S. Jung, Scott McBurney, Allysia Park, Donald J. McAlpine, Karen F. Vanderwolf, Christopher J. Kyle & Craig K.R. Willis
The fungus that causes bat white-nose syndrome (WNS) recently leaped from eastern North America to the Pacific Coast. The pathogen’s spread is associated with the genetic population structure of a host (Myotis lucifugus). To understand the fine-scale neutral and immunogenetic variation among northern populations of M. lucifugus, we sampled 1142 individuals across the species’ northern range. We used genotypes at 11 microsatellite loci to reveal the genetic structure of, and directional gene flow among, populations...

Data from: Population genetics reveal Myotis keenii (Keen’s myotis) and Myotis evotis (long-eared myotis) to be a single species

Cori Lausen, Michael F. Proctor, David Nagorsen, Doug Burles, David Paetkau, Erin Harmston, Karen Blejwas, Purnima Govindarajulu & Laura Friis
Abstract: Recognizing delineations of gene flow among groups of animals can be challenging, but necessary for conservation and management. Of particular importance is the identification of species boundaries. Several physical and genetic traits have been used with mixed success to distinguish Myotis keenii (Merriam, 1895) (Keen’s myotis) and Myotis evotis (H. Allen, 1864) (long-eared myotis), but it is unclear whether species distinction is biologically warranted. We generated 12-14 microsatellite loci genotypes for 275 long-eared Myotis...

Bowhead whales overwinter in the Amundsen Gulf and Eastern Beaufort Sea

Stephen Insley, William Halliday, Xavier Mouy & Niki Diogou
The bowhead whale is the only baleen whale endemic to the Arctic and is well adapted to this environment. Bowheads live near the polar ice edge for much of the year and although sea ice dynamics are not the only driver of their annual migratory movements, it likely plays a key role. Given the intrinsic variability of open water and ice, one might expect bowhead migratory plasticity to be high and linked to this proximate...

Interspecific variation in evaporative water loss and temperature response, but not metabolic rate, among hibernating bats

Liam McGuire, Nathan Fuller, Yvonne Dzal, Catherine Haase, Brandon Klüg-Baerwald, Kirk Silas, Raina Plowright, Cori Lausen, Craig Willis & Sarah Olson
Hibernation is widespread among mammals in a variety of environmental contexts. However, few experimental studies consider interspecific comparisons, and for many unstudied (or understudied) species we must assume the underlying physiology of hibernation is comparable to the relatively few species that have been studied in detail. Studies of interspecific variation provide insight into general patterns of hibernation strategies. We studied 13 species of free-living bats, including populations spread over thousands of kilometers and diverse habitats....

Body mass and hibernation microclimate may predict bat susceptibility to white-nose syndrome

Catherine Haase, Nathan Fuller, Yvonne Dzal, C. Reed Hranac, David Hayman, Cori Lausen, Kirk Silas, Sarah Olson & Raina Plowright
In multi-host disease systems, differences in mortality between species may reflect variation in host physiology, morphology, and behavior. In systems where the pathogen can persist in the environment, microclimate conditions, and the adaptation of the host to these conditions, may also impact mortality. White-nose syndrome is an emerging disease of hibernating bats caused by an environmentally persistent fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans. We assessed the effects of body mass, torpid metabolic rate, evaporative water loss, and hibernaculum...

Similar hibernation physiology in bats across broad geographic ranges

Liam McGuire, Nathan Fuller, Yvonne Dzal, Catherine Haase, Kirk Silas, Craig Willis, Sarah Olson & Cori Lausen
Species with broad geographic ranges may experience varied environmental conditions throughout their range leading to local adaptation. Variation among populations reflects potential adaptability or plasticity, with implications for populations impacted by disease, climate change, and other anthropogenic influences. However, behavior may counteract divergent selection among populations. We studied intraspecific variation in hibernation physiology of Myotis lucifugus (little brown myotis) and Corynorhinus townsendii (Townsend’s big-eared bat), two species of bats with large geographic ranges. We studied...

Registration Year

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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Wildlife Conservation Society Canada
    9
  • Wildlife Conservation Society
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  • University of Winnipeg
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  • Montana State University
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  • Austin Peay State University
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  • University of Waterloo
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  • Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
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  • Massey University
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  • Conservation Science Partners
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  • Texas Tech University
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