11 Works

Data from: Does the niche-breadth or trade-off hypothesis explain the abundance-occupancy relationship in avian haemosporidia?

Sergei V. Drovetski, Sargis A. Aghayan, Vanessa A. Mata, Ricardo J. Lopes, Nicolle A. Mode, Johanna A. Harvey & Gary Voelker
Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the abundance-occupancy relationship (AOR) in parasites. The niche-breadth hypothesis suggests that host generalists are more abundant and efficient at colonizing different host communities than specialists. The trade-off hypothesis argues that host specialists achieve high density across their hosts’ ranges, whereas generalists incur the high cost of adaptation to diverse immuno-defense systems. We tested these hypotheses using 386 haemosporidian cytochrome-b lineages (1894 sequences) recovered from 2318 birds of 103...

Data from: High-resolution mapping reveals hundreds of genetic incompatibilities in hybridizing fish species

Molly Schumer, Rongfeng Cui, Daniel Powell, Rebecca Dresner, Gil G. Rosenthal, Peter Andolfatto & Daniel L Powell
Hybridization is increasingly being recognized as a common process in both animal and plant species. Negative epistatic interactions between genes with different parental ancestry decrease the fitness of hybrids and can limit gene flow between species. However, little is known about the number and genome-wide distribution of genetic incompatibilities separating species. To detect interacting genes, we perform a detailed genome scan for linkage disequilibrium between unlinked genomic regions in naturally occurring hybrid populations of swordtail...

Data from: Sexual selection on female ornaments in the sex-role-reversed Gulf pipefish (Syngnathus scovelli)

Sarah P. Flanagan, James B. Johnson, Emily Rose Rose, Adam G. Jones & E. Rose
Understanding how selection acts on traits individually and in combination is an important step in deciphering the mechanisms driving evolutionary change, but for most species, and especially those in which sexual selection acts more strongly on females than on males, we have no estimates of selection coefficients pertaining to the multivariate sexually selected phenotype. Here, we use a laboratory-based mesocosm experiment to quantify pre- and post-mating selection on female secondary sexual traits in the Gulf...

Data from: Worldwide patterns of ancestry, divergence, and admixture in domesticated cattle

Jared Egan Decker, Stephanie D. McKay, Megan M. Rolf, JaeWoo Kim, Antonio Molina Alcalá, Tad S. Sonstegard, Olivier Hanotte, Anders Götherström, Christopher M. Seabury, Lisa Praharani, Masroor Ellahi Babar, Luciana Correia De Almieda Regitano, Mehmet Ali Yildiz, Michael P. Heaton, Wan-Sheng Liu, Chu-Zhao Lei, James M. Reecy, Muhammad Saif-Ur-Rehman, Robert D. Schnabel & Jeremy F. Taylor
The domestication and development of cattle has considerably impacted human societies, but the histories of cattle breeds have been poorly understood especially for African, Asian, and American breeds. Using genotypes from 43,043 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphism markers scored in 1,543 animals, we evaluate the population structure of 134 domesticated bovid breeds. Regardless of the analytical method or sample subset, the three major groups of Asian indicine, Eurasian taurine, and African taurine were consistently observed. Patterns...

Data from: The legend of the Canadian horse: genetic diversity and breed origin

Anas Khanshour, Rytis Juras, Rick Blackburn & Ernest Gus Cothran
The Canadian breed of horse invokes a fascinating chapter of North American history and as such it is now a heritage breed and the national horse of Canada. The aims of this study were to determine the level of genetic diversity in the Canadian, investigate the possible foundation breeds and the role it had in the development of the US horse breeds, such as Morgan Horse. We tested a total of 981 horses by using...

Data from: Pulsing hydrology determines top-down control of basal resources in a tropical river-floodplain ecosystem

Kirk O. Winemiller, Jose V. Montoya, Daniel L. Roelke, James B. Cotner, Craig A. Layman, Luzmila Sanchez & Maria M. Castillo
Variable hydrology of rivers strongly affects biophysical factors that influence primary production and population densities, thereby affecting the relative influence of bottom-up and top-down processes in trophic networks. Many tropical floodplain rivers have sustained seasonal flood pulses driven by precipitation patterns of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. These changes in flow alter concentrations of dissolved nutrients, aquatic primary productivity, and per-unit-area densities of aquatic organisms. Therefore, one would predict that the strength of top-down effects of...

Data from: Hallauer's Tusón: a decade of selection for tropical- to-temperate phenological adaptation in maize

Juliana E. C. Teixeira, Teclemariam Weldekidan, Natalia De Leon, Sherry Flint-Garcia, James B. Holland, Nick Lauter, Seth C. Murray, Wenwei Xu, David A. Hessel, Adrienne E. Kleintop, James A. Hawk, Arnel R. Hallauer & Randall J. Wisser
Crop species exhibit an astounding capacity for environmental adaptation, but genetic bottlenecks resulting from intense selection for adaptation and productivity can lead to a genetically vulnerable crop. Improving the genetic resiliency of temperate maize depends upon the use of tropical germplasm, which harbors a rich source of natural allelic diversity. Here, the adaptation process was studied in a tropical maize population subjected to 10 recurrent generations of directional selection for early flowering in a single...

Data from: Extensive introgression in a malaria vector species complex revealed by phylogenomics

Michael C. Fontaine, James B. Pease, Aaron Steele, Robert M. Waterhouse, Daniel E. Neafsey, Igor V. Sharakhov, Xiofang Jiang, Andrew B. Hall, Flaminia Catteruccia, Evdoxia Kakani, Sarah N. Mitchell, Yi-Chieh Wu, Hilary A. Smith, R. Rebecca Love, Mara K. Lawniczak, Michel A. Slotman, Scott J. Emrich, Matthew W. Hahn & Nora J. Besansky
Introgressive hybridization is now recognized as a widespread phenomenon, but its role in evolution remains contested. Here we use newly available reference genome assemblies to investigate phylogenetic relationships and introgression in a medically important group of Afrotropical mosquito sibling species. We have identified the correct species branching order to resolve a contentious phylogeny, and show that lineages leading to the principal vectors of human malaria were among the first to split. Pervasive autosomal introgression between...

Data from: Multiple mating and reproductive skew in parental and introgressed females of the live-bearing fish Xiphophorus birchmanni

Kimberly A. Paczolt, Courtney N. Passow, Pablo J. Delclos, Holly K. Kindsvater, Adam G. Jones & Gil G. Rosenthal
Just as mating patterns can promote speciation or hybridization, the presence of hybridization can shape mating patterns within a population. In this study, we characterized patterns of multiple mating and reproductive skew in a naturally hybridizing swordtail fish species, Xiphophorus birchmanni. We quantified multiple mating using microsatellite markers to genotype embryos from 43 females collected from 2 wild populations. We also used a suite of single-nucleotide polymorphism markers to categorize females and their inferred mates...

Data from: Functionally reciprocal mutations of the prolactin signalling pathway define hairy and slick cattle

Matthew D. Littlejohn, Kristen M. Henty, Tiplady Kathryn, Thomas Johnson, Chad Harland, Thomas Lopdell, Richard G. Sherlock, Wanbo Li, Steven D. Lukefahr, Bruce C. Shanks, Dorian J. Garrick, Russel G. Snell, Richard J. Spelman & Stephen R. Davis
WGS Variants from 556 NZ Dairy Animals Chr23:30627379-40627379rtg_3.3.1_556_animal_Chr23:30627379-40627379_for_dryad.vcf.gzExome Variants in Multiple Breeds Chr20:34783594-42331973GATK-10MB-Window-Exomes.vcf.gzHairy syndrome genotypes and phenotypesGenotypes and phenotype used for genome-wide analysis of the hairy syndrome, Plink binary format (.bim .bed .fam)gen_phen_data_for_paper.zipHairy bull progeny TaqMan resultsHairy_bull_progeny_TaqMan_results.txtphysiological phenotypesphysiological_phenos.zipDFAM association results for 628,279 SNPDFAM_assoc_results.zipPhased genotypes and phenotypes for 82 Senepol crossbreedsphased_gen_phen_data_slick.zip

Data from: Stick insect genomes reveal natural selection's role in parallel speciation

Victor Soria-Carrasco, Zachariah Gompert, Aaron A. Comeault, Timothy E. Farkas, Thomas L. Parchman, J. Spencer Johnston, C. Alex Buerkle, Jeffrey L. Feder, Jens Bast, Tanja Schwander, Scott P. Egan, Bernard J. Crespi & Patrik Nosil
Natural selection can drive the repeated evolution of reproductive isolation, but the genomic basis of parallel speciation remains poorly understood. We analyzed whole-genome divergence between replicate pairs of stick insect populations that are adapted to different host plants and undergoing parallel speciation. We found thousands of modest-sized genomic regions of accentuated divergence between populations, most of which are unique to individual population pairs. We also detected parallel genomic divergence across population pairs involving an excess...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    11

Affiliations

  • Texas A&M University
    11
  • Iowa State University
    3
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • North West Agriculture and Forestry University
    1
  • Rice University
    1
  • University of Liège
    1
  • Lincoln University
    1
  • University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences
    1
  • Utah State University
    1
  • Princeton University
    1