52 Works

Divergent neurogenomic responses shape social learning of both personality and mate preference

Pablo Delclos, Santiago Forero & Gil Rosenthal
Behavior plays a fundamental role in shaping the origin and fate of species. Mating decisions can act to promote or restrict gene flow, as can personality traits that influence dispersal and niche use. Mate choice and personality are often both learned and therefore influenced by an individual’s social environment throughout development. Likewise, the molecular pathways that shape these behaviors may also be co-expressed. In this study on swordtail fish (Xiphophorus birchmanni), we show that female...

Data from: The upper thermal tolerance for a Texas population of the hairy maggot blow fly Chrysomya rufifacies Macquart (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

Travis Rusch, Ashleigh Faris, Lauren Beebe, Jeffery Tomberlin & Aaron Tarone
The hairy maggot blow fly (Chrysomya rufifacies: Macquart) is an invasive necrophagous fly found throughout the continental United States. Chrysomya rufifacies is of medical/veterinary, forensic, and ecological importance due to its ability to cause myiasis, colonize human remains, and displace native Diptera. However, little is known about their upper thermal tolerance, which could be used to better predict their invasion potential. We investigated the upper thermal tolerance of C. rufifacies exposed to different temperatures (20...

QTL × environment interactions underlie adaptive divergence in switchgrass across a large latitudinal gradient

David Lowry, John Lovell, Li Zhang, Jason Bonnette, Philip Fay, Robert Mitchell, John Lloyd-Reilley, Arvid Boe, Yanqi Wu, Francis Rouquette, Richard Wynia, Xiaoyu Weng, Kathrine Behrman, Adam Healey, Kerrie Barry, Anna Lipzen, Diane Bauer, Aditi Sharma, Jerry Jenkins, Jeremy Schmutz, Felix B. Fritschi & Thomas E. Juenger
Local adaptation is the process by which natural selection drives adaptive phenotypic divergence across environmental gradients. Theory suggests that local adaptation results from genetic trade-offs at individual genetic loci, where adaptation to one set of environmental conditions results in a cost to fitness in alternative environments. However, the degree to which there are costs associated with local adaptation is poorly understood because most of these experiments rely on two-site reciprocal transplant experiments. Here, we quantify...

Data from: Can ancestry and morphology be used as surrogates for species niche relationships?

Friedrich Keppeler & Kirk Winemiller
Species interactions are difficult to quantify, and, consequently, many studies have used species traits and phylogeny as proxies under an assumption of niche conservatism (i.e., closely related and morphologically similar species should have similar niches). However, few studies have investigated whether niches actually are conserved within and across diverse communities. Here, we tested the degree to which phylogenetic relatedness and morphological similarity predict diets and stable isotopic ratios (δ15N and δ13C), two common descriptors of...

Data from: Testing models of reciprocal relations between social influence and integration in STEM across the college years

Paul Hernandez, V. Bede Agocha, Lauren Carney, Mica Estrada, Sharon Lee, David Loomis, Michelle Williams & Crystal Park
The present study tests predictions from the Tripartite Integration Model of Social Influences (TIMSI) concerning processes linking social interactions to social integration into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) communities and careers. Students from historically overrepresented groups in STEM were followed from their senior year of high school through their senior year in college. Based on TIMSI, we hypothesized that interactions with social influence agents (operationalized as mentor network diversity, faculty mentor support, and research...

Major inconsistencies of inferred population genetic structure estimated in a large set of domestic horse breeds using microsatellites

Stephan Funk, Jose Luis Vega-Pla, Cristina Luis, Gus Cothran & Rytis Juras
STRUCTURE remains the most applied tool aimed at recovering the true, but unknown, population structure from observed microsatellite data or other genetic markers. About 30% of STRUCTURE-based studies could not be reproduced (Gilbert et al., 2012). Here we use a large set of data from 2323 horses from 93 domestic breeds plus the Przewalski horse, typed at 15 microsatellite markers, to evaluate how program settings, in particular the so far insufficiently evaluated number of replicates,...

Emergent social cohesion for coping with community disruptions in disasters

Chao Fan, Yucheng Jiang & Ali Mostafavi
Social cohesion is an important determinant of community well-being, especially in times of distress such as disasters. This study investigates the phenomena of emergent social cohesion, which is characterized by abrupt, temporary, and extensive social ties with the goal of sharing and receiving information regarding a particular event influencing a community. In the context of disasters, emergent social cohesion, enabled by social media usage, could play a significant role in improving the ability of communities...

Data From: TERRA-REF, An open reference data set from high resolution genomics, phenomics, and imaging sensors

David LeBauer, Burnette Maxwell, Jeffrey Demieville, Noah Fahlgren, Andrew French, Roman Garnett, Zhenbin Hu, Kimberly Huynh, Rob Kooper, Zongyang Li, Maitiniyazi Maimaitijiang, Jerome Mao, Todd Mockler, Geoffrey Morris, Maria Newcomb, Michael Ottman, Philip Ozersky, Sidike Paheding, Duke Pauli, Robert Pless, Wei Qin, Kristina Riemer, Gareth Rohde, William Rooney, Vasit Sagan … & Charles Zender
The ARPA-E funded TERRA-REF project is generating open-access reference datasets for the study of plant sensing, genomics, and phenomics. Sensor data were generated by a field scanner sensing platform that captures color, thermal, hyperspectral, and active flourescence imagery as well as three dimensional structure and associated environmental measurements. This dataset is provided alongside data collected using traditional field methods in order to support calibration and validation of algorithms used to extract plot level phenotypes from...

Maps of northern peatland extent, depth, carbon storage and nitrogen storage

Gustaf Hugelius, Julie Loisel, Sarah Chadburn, Robert B. Jackson, Miriam Jones, Glen MacDonald, Maija Marushchak, David Olefeldt, Maara Packalen, Matthias B. Siewert, Claire Treat, Merritt Turestsky, Carolina Voigt & Zicheng Yu
This dataset is grids of peatland extent, peat depth, peatland organic carbon storage, peatland total nitrogen storage and approximate extent of ombrotrophic/minerotrophic peatlands. The grids are geotiff files in 10 km pixel resolution projected in the World Azimuthal Equidistant projection. Note that the peat depth grid shows potential peat depth everywhere,also where there is no peatland cover. For files on peatland organic carbon, total nitrogen extent and extent of ombrotrophic/minerotrophic peatlands, there are separate files...

SARS-CoV-2 transmission and control in a hospital setting: an individual-based modelling study

Qimin Huang, Anirban Mondal, Xiaobing Jiang, Mary Ann Horn, Fei Fan, Peng Fu, Xuan Wang, Hongyang Zhao, Martial Ndeffo Mbah & David Gurarie
Background: Development of strategies for mitigating the severity of COVID-19 is now a top public health priority. We sought to assess strategies for mitigating the COVID-19 outbreak in a hospital setting via the use of non-pharmaceutical interventions. Methods: We developed an individual-based model for COVID-19 transmission in a hospital setting. We calibrated the model using data of a COVID-19 outbreak in a hospital unit in Wuhan. The calibrated model was used to simulate different intervention...

Under the radar: genetic assessment of Rio Grande Shiner (Notropis jemezanus) and Speckled Chub (Macrhybopsis aestivalis), two Rio Grande basin endemic cyprinids that have experienced recent range contractions

Megan Osborne, David Portnoy, Andrew Fields, Kevin Conway, Megan Bean & Christopher Hoagstrom
The Rio Grande drainage of the southwestern United States and Mexico has undergone intense anthropogenic alteration by water diversions, extraction and associated habitat changes. These alterations have disproportionately impacted the pelagic broadcast spawning guild of minnows (pelagophils). Several Rio Grande endemic pelagophils, including the co-occurring Rio Grande Shiner (Notropis jemezanus) and Speckled Chub (Macrhybopsis aestivalis), have experienced dramatic recent range-wide declines yet have slipped under the radar of conservation efforts. The status of N. jemezanus...

Microsatellite genotypes

Lauren Chan, Charlie Painter, Michael Hill, Toby Hibbitts, Daniel Leavitt, Wade Ryberg, Danielle Walkup & Lee Fitzgerald
Phylogeographic divergence and population genetic diversity within species reflect the impacts of habitat connectivity, demographics, and landscape level processes in both the recent and distant past. Characterizing patterns of differentiation across the geographic range of a species provides insight on the roles of organismal and environmental traits, on evolutionary divergence, and future population persistence. This is particularly true of habitat specialists where habitat availability and resource dependence may result in pronounced genetic structure as well...

Dityrosine formation via reactive oxygen consumption yields increasingly recalcitrant humic-like fluorescent organic matter in the ocean

Ryan Paerl, Iliana Claudio, Michael Shields, Thomas Bianchi & Christopher Osburn
Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a massive elemental pool on Earth and is thought to consist of a chemically complex mixture of molecules. Part of marine DOM is fluorescent (FDOM) and includes humic-like compounds. The chemical composition of, and biochemical pathways that yield, autochthonous humic-like FDOM in the ocean is largely unknown. Inspired by medical and biochemical research detailing the formation of colored and fluorescent dityrosine via peroxidase mediated reactions, we used fluorometry and...

Data from: Accurate genomic predictions for chronic wasting disease in U.S. white-tailed deer

Christopher M. Seabury, David L. Oldeschulte, Eric K. Bhattarai, Dhruti Legare, Pamela J. Ferro, Richard P. Metz, Charles D. Johnson, Mitchell A. Lockwood & Tracy A. Nichols
The geographic expansion of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in U.S. white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) has been largely unabated by best management practices, diagnostic surveillance, and depopulation of positive herds. Using a custom Affymetrix Axiom® single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, we demonstrate that both differential susceptibility to CWD, and natural variation in disease progression, are moderately to highly heritable ( among farmed U.S. white-tailed deer, and that loci other than PRNP are involved. Genome-wide association analyses...

Detoxification-related gene expression accompanies anhydrobiosis in the foliar nematode (Aphelenchoides fragariae)

Zhen Fu, Paula Agudelo & Christina Wells
The foliar nematode (Aphelenchoides fragariae) is a quarantined pest that infects a broad range of herbaceous and woody plants. Previous work has demonstrated its remarkable ability to survive rapid and extreme desiccation, although the specific mechanisms underlying its anhydrobiotic response have not been characterized. We used RNA sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly to compare patterns of gene expression between hydrated and 24-hr desiccated nematodes. Two thousand eighty-three and 953 genes were significantly up- and...

The Distanced Church: Reflections on Doing Church Online - mobile version

Mobile version. This eBook experiment creates an accessible international dialogue between church leaders, theologians, and media scholars. The Distanced Church is a collection of 30 essays exploring the challenges and opportunities created by the current global COVID-19 pandemic for religious groups, and churches having to move from offline to online gatherings. This collection was put together in just 3 week to enable it to be distributed to religious organizations and researchers seeking to navigate and...

TEACHING WITH PRIMARY SOURCES: REPORT FROM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY FOR ITHAKA S+R

Joel D. Kitchens, Kevin M. O'Sullivan & Tina Budzise-Weaver

Whole genome analysis reveals aneuploidies in early pregnancy loss in the horse

Shilton Charlotte A., Anne Kahler, Brian W. Davis, James R. Crabtree, James Crowhurst, Andrew J. McGladdery, Claire Wathes, Terje Raudsepp & Amanda M. de Mestre

Sensitive SERS Characterization and Analysis of Chlorpyrifos and Aldicarb Residues in Animal Feed using Gold Nanoparticles

Kyung-Min Lee, Danielle Yarbrough, Mena Kozman, Timothy Herrman, Jinhyuk Park, Rui Wang & Dmitry Kurouski

CAREER: 4.5D Printing of Nickel Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

Alaa Elwany

Phylogenomic analysis sheds light on the evolutionary pathways towards acoustic communication in Orthoptera

Hojun Song, Olivier Béthoux, Seunggwan Shin, Alexander Donath, Harald Letsch, Shanlin Liu, Duane D. McKenna, Guanliang Meng, Bernhard Misof, Lars Podsiadlowski, Xin Zhou, Benjamin Wipfler & Sabrina Simon
Acoustic communication is enabled by the evolution of specialised hearing and sound producing organs. In this study, we performed a large-scale macroevolutionary study to understand how both hearing and sound production evolved and affected diversification in the insect order Orthoptera, which includes many familiar singing insects, such as crickets, katydids, and grasshoppers. Using phylogenomic data, we firmly establish phylogenetic relationships among the major lineages and divergence time estimates within Orthoptera, as well as the lineage-specific...

Data from: Floral bagging differentially affects handling behaviors and single-visit pollen deposition by honey bees and native bees

Jacob Cecala, Pierre Lau & Joan Leong
Measurements of pollinator performance are crucial to pollination studies, enabling researchers to quantify the relative value of different pollinator species to plant reproduction. One of the most widely employed measures of pollinator performance is single-visit pollen deposition, the number of conspecific pollen grains deposited to a stigma after one pollinator visit. To ensure a pollen-free stigma, experimenters must first bag flowers before exposing them to a pollinator. Bagging flowers, however, may unintentionally manipulate floral characteristics...

Data from: Bee phenology is predicted by climatic variation and functional traits

Michael Stemkovski, Will Pearse, Sean Griffin, Gabriella Pardee, Jason Gibbs, Terry Griswold, John Neff, Ryan Oram, Molly RightMyer, Cory Sheffield, Karen Wright, Brian Inouye, David Inouye & Rebecca Irwin
Climate change is shifting the environmental cues that determine the phenology of interacting species. Plant-pollinator systems may be susceptible to temporal mismatch if bees and flowering plants differ in their phenological responses to warming temperatures. While the cues that trigger flowering are well-understood, little is known about what determines bee phenology. Using Generalized Additive Models, we analyzed time-series data representing 67 bee species collected over nine years in the Colorado Rocky Mountains to perform the...

Data from: Risky roots and careful herbivores: Sustained herbivory by a root-feeding herbivore attenuates indirect plant defences

John Grunseich, Morgan Thompson, Allison Hay, Zachary Gorman, Michael Kolomiets, Micky Eubanks & Anjel Helms
Abstract Aboveground plant tissues produce characteristic blends of volatile compounds in response to insect herbivory. These herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) function in plant defence and mediate foraging decisions by herbivores and their natural enemies. The ecological roles of HIPVs as foraging cues for different trophic levels highlight an important conflict for herbivores that need to locate suitable host plants while avoiding competition and predation. Plant roots also emit HIPVs following herbivory, but our understanding of...

Data from: Genotype and male sterility phenotype data for An. coluzzii x An. quadriannulatus backcross

Kevin Deitz, Willem Takken & Michel Slotman
The Anopheles gambiae complex is comprised of eight morphologically indistinguishable species and has emerged as a model system for the study of speciation genetics due to the rapid radiation of its member species over the past two million years. Male hybrids between most An. gambiae complex species pairs are sterile, and some genotype combinations in hybrid males cause inviability. We investigated the genetic basis of hybrid male inviability and sterility between An. coluzzii and An....

Registration Year

  • 2020
    52

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    41
  • Text
    10
  • Output Management Plan
    1

Affiliations

  • Texas A&M University
    52
  • Wageningen University & Research
    3
  • Cornell University
    3
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • Case Western Reserve University
    2
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    1
  • Texas A&M University System
    1
  • Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research
    1
  • Stanford University
    1