31 Works

Data from: Effects of plant diversity on the concentration of secondary plant metabolites and the density of arthropods on focal plants in the field

Olga Kostenko, Patrick P. J. Mulder, Matthijs Courbois & T. Martijn Bezemer
1. The diversity of the surrounding plant community can directly affect the abundance of insects on a focal plant as well as the size and quality of that focal plant. However, to what extent the effects of plant diversity on the arthropod community on a focal plant are mediated by host plant quality or by the diversity of the surrounding plants remains unresolved. 2. In the field, we sampled arthropod communities on focal Jacobaea vulgaris...

Data from: The potential of hyperspectral patterns of winter wheat to detect changes in soil microbial community composition

W. H. Gera Hol, Sabrina Carvalho & Wim H. Van Der Putten
Reliable information on soil status and crop health is crucial for detecting and mitigating disasters like pollution or minimizing impact from soil-borne diseases. While infestation with an aggressive soil pathogen can be detected via reflected light spectra, it is unknown to what extent hyperspectral reflectance could be used to detect overall changes in soil biodiversity. We tested the hypotheses that spectra can be used to 1) separate plants growing with microbial communities from different farms;...

Data from: Genetic variation in variability: phenotypic variability of fledging weight and its evolution in a songbird population

Han A. Mulder, Philip Gienapp & Marcel E. Visser
Variation in traits is essential for natural selection to operate and genetic and environmental effects can contribute to this phenotypic variation. From domesticated populations, we know that families can differ in their level of within-family variance, which leads to the intriguing situation that within-family variance can be heritable. For offspring traits, such as birth weight, this implies that within-family variance in traits can vary among families and can thus be shaped by natural selection. Empirical...

Data from: Modification of plant-induced responses by an insect ecosystem engineer influences the colonization behaviour of subsequent shelter-users

Akane Uesugi, Kimberly Morrell, Erik H. Poelman, Ciska E. Raaijmakers & André Kessler
Herbivores that modify plant morphology, such as gall forming insects, can disproportionately impact arthropod community on their host plants by providing novel habitats and shelters from biotic and abiotic stresses. These ecosystem engineers could also modify plant chemical properties, but how such changes in plant quality affect the behaviour of subsequent colonizers has rarely been investigated. We explored how an initial infestation of the tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima) by an ecosystem engineer, the rosette gall-midge...

Data from: After-life effects: living and dead invertebrates differentially affect plants and their associated above- and belowground multitrophic communities

Martine Kos, Jingying Jing, Ivor Keesmaat, Steven A.J. Declerck, Roel Wagenaar, T. Martijn Bezemer & Steven A. J. Declerck
Above-belowground (AG-BG) studies typically focus on plant-mediated effects inflicted by living organisms. However, animal cadavers may also play an important role in AG-BG interactions. Here, we explore whether living and dead foliar-feeding and soil-dwelling invertebrates differentially affect plants and their associated AG and BG multitrophic communities. In a mesocosm study we separated effects of living and dead locusts (AG herbivores) and earthworms (BG detritivores) on experimental multitrophic communities consisting of eight plant species, an AG...

Data from: Aboveground mammal and invertebrate exclusions cause consistent changes in soil food webs of two subalpine grassland types, but mechanisms are system-specific

Martijn L. Vandegehuchte, Wim H. Van Der Putten, Henk Duyts, Martin Schütz & Anita C. Risch
Ungulates, smaller mammals, and invertebrates can each affect soil biota through their influence on vegetation and soil characteristics. However, direct and indirect effects of the aboveground biota on soil food webs remain to be unraveled. We assessed effects of progressively excluding aboveground large-, medium- and small-sized mammals as well as invertebrates on soil nematode diversity and feeding type abundances in two subalpine grassland types: short- and tall-grass vegetation. We explored pathways that link exclusions of...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    31

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    31

Affiliations

  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    31
  • Wageningen University & Research
    14
  • Radboud University Nijmegen
    3
  • University of Turku
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • University of Amsterdam
    2
  • KU Leuven
    2