27 Works

Data from: Biodiversity change is uncoupled from species richness trends: consequences for conservation and monitoring

Helmut Hillebrand, Bernd Blasius, Elizabeth T. Borer, Jonathan M. Chase, John Downing, Britas Klemens Eriksson, Christopher T. Filstrup, W. Stanley Harpole, Dorothee Hodapp, Stefano Larsen, Aleksandra M. Lewandowska, Eric W. Seabloom, Dedmer B. Van De Waal, Alexey B. Ryabov & John A. Downing
1. Global concern about human impact on biological diversity has triggered an intense research agenda on drivers and consequences of biodiversity change in parallel with international policy seeking to conserve biodiversity and associated ecosystem functions. Quantifying the trends in biodiversity is far from trivial, however, as recently documented by meta-analyses which report little if any net change of local species richness through time. 2. Here, we summarize several limitations of species richness as a metric...

Data from: Individuality in northern lapwing migration and its link to timing of breeding

Götz Eichhorn, Willem Bil & James W. Fox
We tracked eight adult northern lapwings, Vanellus vanellus, (six females and two males) from a Dutch breeding colony by light-level geolocation year-round, three of them for multiple years. We show that birds breeding virtually next to each other may choose widely separated wintering grounds, stretching from nearby the colony west towards the UK and Ireland, and southwest through France into Iberia and Morocco. However, individual lapwings appeared relatively faithful to a chosen wintering area, and...

Data from: Intergenerational environmental effects: functional signals in offspring transcriptomes and metabolomes after parental jasmonic acid treatment in apomictic dandelion

Koen J. F. Verhoeven, Eline H. Verbon, Thomas P. Van Gurp, Carla Oplaat, Julie Ferreira De Carvalho, Alison M. Morse, Mark Stahl, Mirka Macel & Lauren M. McIntyre
Parental environments can influence offspring traits. However, the magnitude of the impact of parental environments on offspring molecular phenotypes is poorly understood. Here, we test the direct effects and intergenerational effects of jasmonic acid (JA) treatment, which is involved in herbivory-induced defense signaling, on transcriptomes and metabolomes in apomictic common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale). In a full factorial crossed design with parental and offspring JA and control treatments, we performed leaf RNA-seq gene expression analysis, LC-MS...

Data from: Impact of native and non-native aquatic plants on methane emission and phytoplankton growth

Bart M. C. Grutters, Ralf C. H. Aben, Sarian Kosten, Elisabeth S. Bakker, Bart Grutters & Elisabeth Bakker
Freshwater plants affect the ecosystem functioning of shallow aquatic ecosystems. However, because native plants are threatened by environmental change such as eutrophication, global warming and biological invasions, continued ecosystem functioning may be at risk. In this study, we explored how the growth of native and non-native plant species in eutrophic, warm conditions impacts two plant ecosystem functions: regulation of phytoplankton growth and methane emission. We expected that plants would inhibit phytoplankton growth, while for methane...

Data from: Living apart together—bacterial volatiles influence methanotrophic growth and activity

Annelies Veraart, Paolina Garbeva, Femke Van Beersum, Adrian Ho, Cornelis A. Hordijk, Marion Meima-Franke, A. J. Zweers & Paul Bodelier
Volatile organic compounds play an important role in microbial interactions. However, little is known about how volatile-mediated interactions modulate biogeochemical processes. In this study, we show the effect of volatile-mediated interaction on growth and functioning of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria, grown in co-culture with five different heterotrophs. Both growth and methane oxidation of Methylobacter luteus were stimulated by interaction with specific heterotrophs. In Methylocystis parvus, we observed significant growth promotion, while methane oxidation was inhibited. Volatolomics...

Data from: Periphyton density is similar on native and non-native plant species

Bart M. C. Grutters, Elisabeth Maria Gross, Ellen Van Donk & Elisabeth S. Bakker
Non-native plants increasingly dominate the vegetation in aquatic ecosystems and thrive in eutrophic conditions. In eutrophic conditions, submerged plants risk being overgrown by epiphytic algae; however, if non-native plants are less susceptible to periphyton than natives, this would contribute to their dominance. Non-native plants may differ from natives in their susceptibility to periphyton growth due to differences in nutrient release, allelopathy and architecture. Yet, there is mixed evidence for whether plants interact with periphyton growth...

Data from: Fungal interactions reduce carbon use efficiency

Daniel S. Maynard, Thomas W. Crowther & Mark A. Bradford
The efficiency by which fungi decompose organic matter contributes to the amount of carbon that is retained in biomass vs. lost to the atmosphere as respiration. This carbon use efficiency (CUE) is affected by various abiotic conditions, including temperature and nutrient availability. Theoretically, the physiological costs of interspecific interactions should likewise alter CUE, yet the magnitude of these costs is untested. Here we conduct a microcosm experiment to quantify how interactions among wood-decay basidiomycete fungi...

Data from: Relatedness with plant species in native community influences ecological consequences of range expansions

Kadri Koorem, Olga Kostenko, L. Basten Snoek, Carolin Weser, Kelly S. Ramirez, Rutger A. Wilschut & Wim H. Van Der Putten
Global warming is enabling many plant species to expand their range to higher latitudes and altitudes, where they may suffer less from natural aboveground and belowground enemies. Reduced control by natural enemies can enable climate warming-induced range expanders to get an advantage in competition with natives and become disproportionally abundant in their new range. However, so far studies have examined individual growth of range expanders, which have common congeneric plant species in their new range....

Data from: Parallel diversifications of Cremastosperma and Mosannona (Annonaceae), tropical rainforest trees tracking Neogene upheaval of South America

Michael D. Pirie, Paul J.M. Maas, Rutger A. Wilschut, Heleen Melchers-Sharrott & Lars W. Chatrou
Much of the immense present day biological diversity of Neotropical rainforests originated from the Miocene onwards, a period of geological and ecological upheaval in South America. We assess the impact of the Andean orogeny, drainage of lake Pebas, and closure of the Panama Isthmus on two clades of tropical trees (Cremastosperma, c. 31 spp.; and Mosannona, c. 14 spp.; both Annonaceae). Phylogenetic inference revealed similar patterns of geographically restricted clades and molecular dating showed diversifications...

Data from: Soil microbial species loss affects plant biomass and survival of an introduced bacterial strain, but not inducible plant defences

Viola Kurm, Wim H. Van Der Putten, Ana Pineda & W.H. Gera Hol
- Background and Aims: Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains can influence plant-insect interactions. However, little is known about the effect of changes in the soil bacterial community in general and especially the loss of rare soil microbes on these interactions. Here, the influence of rare soil microbe-reduction on induced systemic resistance (ISR) in a wild ecotype of Arabidopsis thaliana against the aphid Myzus persicae was investigated. - Methods: To create a gradient of microbial abundances,...

Data from: Plant community evenness responds to spatial plant-soil feedback heterogeneity primarily through the diversity of soil conditioning

E. R. Jasper Wubs & Martijn T. Bezemer
1.Plant-soil feedback (PSF) has been identified as a key driver of local plant diversity and evenness in competitive communities. However, while it has been shown that spatial PSF heterogeneity can alter plant performance and competitive interactions, there is no proof of principle that spatial PSF heterogeneity enhances community diversity. 2.Using a grassland model system we separated two aspects of spatial heterogeneity: the number of species conditioning the soil and spatial distribution of the PSFs. 3.Our...

Data from: Methods in field chronobiology

Davide Michelangelo Dominoni, Susanne Åkesson, Raymond Klaassen, Kamiel Spoelstra & Martin Bulla
Chronobiological research has seen a continuous development of novel approaches and techniques to measure rhythmicity at different levels of biological organization from locomotor activity (e.g. migratory restlessness) to physiology (e.g. temperature and hormone rhythms, and relatively recently also in genes, proteins and metabolites). However, the methodological advancements in this field have been mostly and sometimes exclusively used only in indoor laboratory settings. In parallel, there has been an unprecedented and rapid improvement in our ability...

Data from: Balancing food and density-dependence in the spatial distribution of an interference-prone forager

Adriaan Dokter, E. Emiel Van Loon, Cornelis Rappoldt, Kees Oosterbeek, Martin J. Baptist, Willem Bouten, Bruno J. Ens & Adriaan M. Dokter
Foraging distributions are thought to be density-dependent, because animals not only select for a high availability and quality of resources, but also avoid conspecific interference. Since these processes are confounded, their relative importance in shaping foraging distributions remains poorly understood. Here we aimed to rank the contribution of density-dependent and density-independent effects on the spatio-temporal foraging patterns of eurasian oystercatchers. In our intertidal study area, tides caused continuous variation in oystercatcher density, providing an opportunity...

Data from: Soil pathogen-aphid interactions under differences in soil organic matter and mineral fertilizer

Stijn Van Gils, Giovanni Tamburini, Lorenzo Marini, Arjen Biere, Maaike Van Agtmaal, Olaf Tyc, Martine Kos, David Kleijn & Wim H. Van Der Putten
There is increasing evidence showing that microbes can influence plant-insect interactions. In addition, various studies have shown that aboveground pathogens can alter the interactions between plants and insects. However, little is known about the role of soil-borne pathogens in plant-insect interactions. It is also not known how environmental conditions, that steer the performance of soil-borne pathogens, might influence these microbe-plant-insect interactions. Here, we studied effects of the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani on aphids (Sitobion avenae)...

Data from: Photoperiod at the larval stage sets the timing of entire annual program in an herbivorous insect

Lucia Salis, Erik Van Den Hoorn, Domien G. M. Beersma, Roelof A. Hut & Marcel E. Visser
To maximize their fitness, organisms need to synchronize their phenology with the seasonal variation in environmental conditions. Most phenological traits are affected by environmental abiotic cues such as photoperiod, temperature and rainfall. When individuals with complex life-cycles fail to match one of the stages with the favourable environment, these negative conditions experienced may lead to carry-over effects and, thus, influence fitness in subsequent stages. In the winter moth, an herbivorous insect with an annual life-cycle,...

Data from: Maternal egg hormones in the mating context: the effect of pair personality

Suvi Ruuskanen, Ton G. G. Groothuis, Alexander T. Baugh, Sonja V. Schaper, Bonnie DeVries, Kees Van Oers & Bonnie De Vries
Animal personality traits emerge developmentally from the interaction of genetic and early environmental factors. Maternal hormones, such as androgens (testosterone, T and androstenedione, A4), transferred to embryos and egg yolks may simultaneously organize multiple behavioural and physiological traits. Whereas previous studies demonstrated an association between the mother's personality and yolk androgen levels, the independent effects of the male partner's personality and pair combination are unknown. We test this association using an ecological model species for...

Data from: Internet blogs, polar bears, and climate-change denial by proxy

Jeffrey A. Harvey, Daphne Van Den Berg, Jacintha Ellers, Remko Kampen, Thomas W. Crowther, Peter Roessingh, Bart Verheggen, Rascha J. M. Nuijten, Eric Post, Stephan Lewandowsky, Ian Stirling, Meena Balgopal, Steven C. Amstrup & Michael E. Mann
Increasing surface temperatures, Arctic sea-ice loss, and other evidence of anthropogenic global warming (AGW) are acknowledged by every major scientific organization in the world. However, there is a wide gap between this broad scientific consensus and public opinion. Internet blogs have strongly contributed to this consensus gap by fomenting misunderstandings of AGW causes and consequences. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) have become a “poster species” for AGW, making them a target of those denying AGW evidence....

Data from: A test of the hierarchical model of litter decomposition

Mark A. Bradford, G. F. Veen, Anne Bonis, Ella M. Bradford, Aimee T. Classen, J. Hans C. Cornelissen, Thomas W. Crowther, Jonathan R. De Long, Gregoire T. Freschet, Paul Kardol, Marta Manrubia-Freixa, Daniel S. Maynard, Gregory S. Newman, Richard S. P. Van Logtestijn, Maria Viketoft, David A. Wardle, William R. Wieder, Stephen A. Wood & Wim H. Van Der Putten
Our basic understanding of plant litter decomposition informs the assumptions underlying widely applied soil biogeochemical models, including those embedded in Earth system models. Confidence in projected carbon cycle-climate feedbacks therefore depends on accurate knowledge about the controls regulating the rate at which plant biomass is decomposed into products such as CO2. Here, we test underlying assumptions of the dominant conceptual model of litter decomposition. The model posits that a primary control on the rate of...

Data from: Functional and evolutionary consequences of cranial fenestration in birds

Sander W.S. Gussekloo, Michael A. Berthaume, Daniel R Pulaski, Irene Westbroek, Jan H. Waarsing, Robin Heinen, Ian R. Grosse, Elizabeth R. Dumont & Sander W. S. Gussekloo
Ostrich-like birds (Palaeognathae) show very little taxonomic diversity while their sister taxon (Neognathae) contains roughly 10000 species. The main anatomical differences between the two taxa are in the crania. Palaeognaths lack an element in the bill called the lateral bar that is present in both ancestral theropods and modern neognaths, have thin zones in the bones of the bill, and robust bony elements on the ventral surface of their crania. Here we use a combination...

Data from: Simulated moult reduces flight performance but overlap with breeding does not affect breeding success in a long-distance migrant

Barbara M. Tomotani, Florian T. Muijres, Julia Koelman, Stefania Casagrande & Marcel E. Visser
1. Long-distance migrants are time-constrained as they need to incorporate many annual cycle stages within a year. Migratory passerines moult in the short interval between breeding and migration. To widen this interval, moult may start while still breeding, but this results in flying with moulting wings when food provisioning. 2. We experimentally simulated wing gaps in breeding male pied flycatchers by plucking 2 primary feathers from both wings. We quantified the nest visitations of both...

Data from: Response of bats to light with different spectra: light-shy and agile bat presence is affected by white and green, but not red light

Kamiel Spoelstra, Roy H. A. Van Grunsven, Jip J. C. Ramakers, Kim B. Ferguson, Thomas Raap, Maurice Donners, Elmar M. Veenendaal & Marcel E. Visser
Artificial light at night has shown a remarkable increase over the past decades. Effects are reported for many species groups, and include changes in presence, behaviour, physiology and life-history traits. Among these, bats are strongly affected, and how bat species react to light is likely to vary with light colour. Different spectra may therefore be applied to reduce negative impacts. We used a unique set-up of eight field sites to study the response of bats...

Data from: Growth strategy, phylogeny and stoichiometry determine the allelopathic potential of native and non-native plants

Bart M.C. Grutters, Benedetta Saccomanno, Elisabeth M. Gross, Dedmar B. Van De Waal, Ellen Van Donk, Elizabeth S. Bakker, Bart M. C. Grutters, Dedmer B. Van De Waal & Elisabeth S. Bakker
Secondary compounds can contribute to the success of non-native plant species if they reduce damage by native herbivores or inhibit the growth of native plant competitors. However, there is opposing evidence on whether the secondary compounds of non-native plant species are stronger than those of natives. This may be explained by other factors, besides plant origin, that affect the potential of plant secondary compounds. We tested how plant origin, phylogeny, growth strategy and stoichiometry affected...

Data from: Temporal carry-over effects in sequential plant–soil feedbacks

Jasper R. Wubs, T. Martijn Bezemer & E. R. Jasper Wubs
Plant-soil feedbacks (PSF) strongly influence plant performance. However, to what extent these PSF effects are persistent in the soil and how they are altered by species that subsequently condition the soil is unclear. Here we test how conspecific and heterospecific soil-conditioning effects interact across different soil-conditioning phases. We conducted a fully factorial glasshouse experiment where six plant species conditioned soils in two consecutive phases and measured the performance of Jacobaea vulgaris. The species that conditioned...

Data from: Warming advances top-down control and reduces producer biomass in a freshwater plankton community

Mandy Velthuis, Lisette N. De Senerpont Domis, Thijs Frenken, Susanne Stephan, Garabet Kazanjian, Ralf Aben, Sabine Hilt, Sarian Kosten, Ellen Van Donk & Dedmer B. Van De Waal
Global warming has been shown to affect ecosystems worldwide. Warming may, for instance, disrupt plant herbivore synchrony and bird phenology in terrestrial systems, reduce primary production in oceans, and promote toxic cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater lakes. Responses of communities will not only depend on direct species-specific temperature effects, but also on indirect effects related to bottom-up and top-down processes. Here, we investigated the impact of warming on freshwater phytoplankton community dynamics, and assessed the relative...

Data from: A stoichiometric perspective of the effect of herbivore dung on ecosystem functioning

Judith Sitters & Harry Olde Venterink
Ungulate herbivores play a prominent role in maintaining the tree–grass balance in African savannas. Their top-down role through selective feeding on either trees or grasses is well studied, but their bottom-up role through deposition of nutrients in dung and urine has been overlooked. Here, we propose a novel concept of savanna ecosystem functioning in which the balance between trees and grasses is maintained through stoichiometric differences in dung of herbivores that feed on them. We...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    27

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    27

Affiliations

  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    27
  • Wageningen University & Research
    11
  • University of Groningen
    4
  • VU University Amsterdam
    3
  • Leiden University
    3
  • Utrecht University
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • Radboud University Nijmegen
    2
  • Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries
    2
  • Yale University
    2