41 Works

Data from: Parasitic wasp-associated symbiont affects plant-mediated species interactions between herbivores

Antonino Cusumano, Feng Zhu, Anne-Nathalie Volkoff, Patrick Verbaarschot, Janneke Bloem, Heiko Vogel, Marcel Dicke & Erik H. Poelman
Microbial mutualistic symbiosis is increasingly recognised as a hidden driving force in the ecology of plant–insect interactions. Although plant‐associated and herbivore‐associated symbionts clearly affect interactions between plants and herbivores, the effects of symbionts associated with higher trophic levels has been largely overlooked. At the third‐trophic level, parasitic wasps are a common group of insects that can inject symbiotic viruses (polydnaviruses) and venom into their herbivorous hosts to support parasitoid offspring development. Here, we show that...

Data from: Relative importance of competition and plant-soil feedback, their synergy, context dependency and implications for coexistence

Ylva Lekberg, James D. Bever, Rebecca A. Bunn, Ray M. Callaway, Miranda M. Hart, Stephanie N. Kivlin, John Klironomos, Beau G. Larkin, John L. Maron, Kurt O. Reinhart, Michael Remke, Wim H. Van Der Putten & Ragan M. Callaway
Plants interact simultaneously with each other and with soil biota, yet the relative importance of competition versus plant soil feedback (PSF) on plant performance is poorly understood. Using a meta-analysis of 38 published studies and 150 plant species, we show that effects of interspecific competition (either growing plants with a competitor or singly, or comparing inter- vs. intraspecific competition) and PSF (comparing home vs. away soil, live vs. sterile soil, or control vs. fungicide-treated soil)...

Data from: Agricultural pastures challenge the attractiveness of natural saltmarsh for a migratory goose

Adriaan M. Dokter, Wimke Fokkema, Barwolt S. Ebbinge, Han Olff, Henk P. Van Der Jeugd & Bart A. Nolet
1. Broad-scale land conversions and fertilizer use have dramatically altered the available staging area for herbivorous long-distance migrants. Instead of natural land, these birds rely increasingly on pastures for migratory fuelling and stopover, often conflicting with farming practices. To be able to predict and manage birds’ future habitat use, the relative advantages and disadvantages of natural (e.g. saltmarsh, intertidal) versus anthropogenic staging sites for foraging need to be understood. 2. We compared the migratory staging...

Data from: Interactions between seed traits and digestive processes determine the germinability of bird-dispersed seeds

Erik Kleyheeg, Mascha Claessens & Merel B. Soons
Waterbirds disperse a wide range of plant seeds via their guts, promoting biotic connectivity between isolated habitat patches. However, the intensity of digestive forces encountered by seeds, and therefore their potential to survive digestive tract passage, varies within and between waterbird species. Here, we investigate under controlled conditions how the interaction between seed traits and digestive strategies affect the germinability of seeds following waterbird-mediated dispersal. We exposed seeds of 30 wetland plant species to the...

Data from: Plant competition alters the temporal dynamics of plant-soil feedbacks

T. Martijn Bezemer, Jingying Jing, J.M. Tanja Bakx-Schotman, Erik-Jan Bijleveld & J. M. Tanja Bakx-Schotman
1. Most studies on plant-soil feedback (PSF) and plant competition measure the feedback response at one moment only. However, PSFs and competition may both change over time, and how PSF and competition interact over time is unclear. 2. We tested the temporal dynamics of PSF and interspecific competition for the forb Jacobaea vulgaris and the grass Holcus lanatus. We grew both species individually and in interspecific competition in soil that was first conditioned in the...

Data from: Differential effects of climate warming on reproduction and functional responses on insects in the fourth trophic level

Cong Chen, Rieta Gols, Arjen Biere & Jeffrey A. Harvey
1. Understanding effects of Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) on species interactions is essential for predicting community responses to climate change. However, while effects of AGW on resource-consumer interactions at the first- and second trophic level have been well studied, little is known about effects on interactions at higher trophic levels at the terminal end of food chains (e.g. in the third and fourth trophic levels). 2. Here, we examined the effects of temperature variability by...

Data from: An affordable and reliable assessment of aquatic decomposition: tailoring the Tea Bag Index to surface waters

Laura M.S. Seelen, Giovanna Flaim, Joost Keuskamp, Sven Teurlincx, Raquel Arias Font, Duygu Tolunay, Markéta Fránková, Kateřina Šumberová, Maria Temponeras, Mirjana Lenhardt, Eleanor Jennings & Lisette N. De Senerpont Domis
Litter decomposition is a vital part of the global carbon cycle as it determines not only the amount of carbon to be sequestered, but also how fast carbon re-enters the cycle. Freshwater systems play an active role in the carbon cycle as it receives, and decomposes, terrestrial litter material alongside decomposing aquatic plant litter. Decomposition of organic matter in the aquatic environment is directly controlled by water temperature and nutrient availability, which are continuously affected...

Data from: Modulation of plant-mediated interactions between herbivores of different feeding guilds: effects of parasitism and belowground interactions

Teresa Vaello, Sandeep J. Sarde, Mª Ángeles Marcos-García, Jetske G. De Boer & Ana Pineda
Herbivory affects subsequent herbivores, mainly regulated by the phytohormones jasmonic (JA) and salicylic acid (SA). Additionally, organisms such as soil microbes belowground or parasitoids that develop inside their herbivorous hosts aboveground, can change plant responses to herbivory. However, it is not yet well known how organisms of trophic levels other than herbivores, below- and above-ground, alter the interactions between insect species sharing a host plant. Here, we investigated whether the parasitoid Aphidius colemani and different...

Data from: Negative effects of litter richness on root decomposition in the presence of detritivores

Yinong Li, Xi Chen, Ciska GF Veen, Nico Eisenhauer, Yu Liang, Xiaomei Zhou, Naili Zhang, Keping Ma & G. F. Ciska Veen
1. Decomposition is a vital process underlying many ecosystem functions. Although a growing number of studies have tested how litter richness affects the decomposition of aboveground plant organs, knowledge remains limited about the decomposition of root mixtures. Here, we used a field experiment in a subtropical forest to investigate how species richness in root litter mixtures (air-dried fresh fine roots) affects the decomposition of root litter material. 2. Based on the concept of resource complementarity,...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in plant-soil feedbacks alters competitive interactions between two grassland plant species

Wei Xue, Frank Berendse & T. Martijn Bezemer
1. The effects of plants on soil vary greatly between plant species and in mixed plant communities this can lead to spatial variation in plant-soil feedback (PSF) effects. Such spatial effects are thought to influence plant species coexistence, but the empirical evidence for this hypothesis is limited. 2. Here, we investigate how spatial heterogeneity in PSFs influences plant growth and competition. The experiment was carried out with high and low nutrient soils to examine how...

Data from: Plant functional diversity and nutrient availability can improve restoration of floating fens via facilitation, complementarity and selection effects

Jeroen P. Van Zuidam, Casper H.A. Van Leeuwen, Elisabeth S. Bakker, Jos T.A. Verhoeven, Stephanie IJff, Edwin T.H.M. Peeters, Bastiaan G. Van Zuidam, Merel B. Soons, Edwin T. H. M. Peeters, Casper H. A. Van Leeuwen & Jos T. A. Verhoeven
1. Peat-forming wetlands, and particularly floating fens forming the initial stages of these ecosystems, are globally declining due to excavation, dehydration and eutrophication. Restoration of these valuable ecosystems typically involves re-establishment of early-successional open-water stages with oligotrophic conditions that are characteristic for these systems. However, restoration success is notoriously limited and a potential solution may be to initiate succession by re-introduction of target plant species. Knowledge is needed on (a) which plant functional groups should...

Data from: Responses of insect herbivores and their food plants to wind exposure and the importance of predation risk

Cong Chen, Arjen Biere, Rieta Gols, Wouter Halfwerk, Kees Van Oers & Jeffrey A. Harvey
1. Wind is an important abiotic factor that influences an array of biological processes, but it is rarely considered in studies on plant-herbivore interactions. 2. Here, we tested whether wind exposure could directly or indirectly affect the performance of two insect herbivores, Plutella xylostella and Pieris brassicae, feeding on Brassica nigra plants. 3. In a greenhouse study using a factorial design, B. nigra plants were exposed to different wind regimes generated by fans before and...

Data from: Symbiotic polydnavirus and venom reveal parasitoid to its hyperparasitoids

Feng Zhu, Antonino Cusumano, Janneke Bloem, Berhane T. Weldegergis, Alexandre Villela, Nina E. Fatouros, Joop J.A. Van Loon, Marcel Dicke, Jeffrey A. Harvey, Heiko Vogel & Erik H. Poelman
Symbiotic relationships may provide organisms with key innovations that aid in the establishment of new niches. For example, during oviposition, some species of parasitoid wasps, whose larvae develop inside the bodies of other insects, inject polydnaviruses into their hosts. These symbiotic viruses disrupt host immune responses, allowing the parasitoid’s progeny to survive. Here, we show that symbiotic polydnaviruses also have a downside to the parasitoid’s progeny by initiating a multi-trophic chain of interactions that reveals...

Data from: Body stores persist as fitness correlate in a long-distance migrant released from food constraints

Adriaan M. Dokter, Wimke Fokkema, Steven K. Bekker, Willem Bouten, Barwoldt S. Ebbinge, Gerard Müskens, Han Olff, Henk P. Van Der Jeugd, Bart A. Nolet & Barwolt S Ebbinge
Long-distance migratory birds rely on acquisition of body reserves to fuel their migration and reproduction. Breeding success depends on the amount of body reserve acquired prior to migration, which is thought to increase with access to food at the fuelling site. Here we studied how food abundance during fuelling affected time budgets and reproductive success. In a regime of plenty, we expected that (1) limitations on food harvesting would become lifted, allowing birds to frequently...

Data from: Resistance and recovery of methane-oxidizing communities depends on stress regime and history; a microcosm study

Henri Van Kruistum, Paul L. E. Bodelier, Adrian Ho, Marion Meima-Franke & Annelies J. Veraart
Although soil microbes are responsible for important ecosystem functions, and soils are under increasing environmental pressure, little is known about their resistance and resilience to multiple stressors. Here, we test resistance and recovery of soil methane-oxidizing communities to two different, repeated, perturbations: soil drying, ammonium addition and their combination. In replicated soil microcosms we measured methane oxidation before and after perturbations, while monitoring microbial abundance and community composition using quantitative PCR assays for the bacterial...

Data from: A mechanistic assessment of the relationship between gut morphology and endozoochorous seed dispersal by waterfowl

Erik Kleyheeg, Bart A. Nolet, Sandra Otero-Ojea & Merel B. Soons
Many plants and invertebrates rely on internal transport by animals for long-distance dispersal. Their dispersal capacity is greatly influenced by interactions with the animal’s digestive tract. Omnivorous birds adjust their digestive tract morphology to seasonally variable diets. We performed feeding trials in waterfowl to unravel how changing organ size, in combination with seed size, affects dispersal potential. We subjected captive mallards to mimics of summer (animal-based), winter (plant-based) and intermediate diets, and analysed gut passage...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    41

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    41

Affiliations

  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    41
  • Wageningen University & Research
    15
  • Utrecht University
    5
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    3
  • Leiden University
    3
  • University of Amsterdam
    3
  • University of Turku
    3
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    2
  • VU University Amsterdam
    2
  • Lund University
    2