9 Works

Data for: Spatial and temporal genetic variation in an exploited reef fish: The effects of exploitation on cohort genetic structure

Zahra Taboun, Ryan Walter, Jennifer Ovenden & Daniel Heath
Many coral reef fishes are fished, often resulting in detrimental genetic effects; however, reef fishes often show unpredictable patterns of genetic variation, which potentially mask the effects of fishing. Our goals were to characterize spatial and temporal genetic variation and determine the effects of fishing on an exploited reef fish, Plectropomus leopardus, Lacepède (the common coral trout). To determine population structure, we genotyped 417 Great Barrier Reef coral trout from four populations sampled in two...

Data from: Predator abundance drives the association between exploratory personality and foraging habitat risk in a wild marine meso-predator.

Félicie Dhellemmes, Matthew Smukall, Tristan Guttridge, Jens Krause & Nigel Hussey
1. In recent years, the incorporation of lower levels of organization to the understanding of population ecology, has led to an increase in interest for animal personality and individual foraging specialization. Despite these topics investigating comparable phenomena, i.e. individual consistency in behavior and in food resource use respectively, they have rarely been investigated together. 2. Food resource use is thought to be at the interface between personality and life-history. More explorative individuals in a population,...

Biometric conversion factors as a unifying platform for comparative assessment of invasive freshwater bivalves

Neil Coughlan, Eoghan Cunningham, Ross Cuthbert, Patrick Joyce, Pedro Anastacio, Filipe Banha, Nicolás Bonel, Stephanie Bradbeer, Elizabeta Briski, Vincent Butitta, Zuzana Čadková, Jaimie Dick, Karel Douda, Lawrence Eagling, Noé Ferreira-Rodríguez, Leandro Hünicken, Mattias Johansson, Louise Kregting, Anna Labecka, Deliang Li, Florencia Liquin, Jonathan Marescaux, Todd Morris, Patrycja Nowakowska, Małgorzata Ożgo … & Francisco Sylvester
1. Invasive bivalves continue to spread and negatively impact freshwater ecosystems worldwide. As different metrics for body size and biomass are frequently used within the literature to standardise bivalve related ecological impacts (e.g. respiration and filtration rates), the lack of broadly applicable conversion equations currently hinders reliable comparison across bivalve populations. To facilitate improved comparative assessment amongst studies originating from disparate geographic locations, we report body size and biomass conversion equations for six invasive freshwater...

Coping with the worst of both worlds: phenotypic adjustments for cold acclimatization benefit northward migration and arrival in the cold in an Arctic breeding songbird

Audrey Le Pogam, Ryan S. O'Connor, Oliver P. Love, Magali Petit, Lyette Régimbald & François Vézina
Cold acclimatization (phenotypic adjustments to cope with cold conditions) is an imperative requirement for birds living at high latitudes during the cold depths of winter. Despite the significant remodelling of key phenotypic traits and energetic costs associated with elevating cold endurance, winter cold acclimatization can also provide further carryover benefits to subsequent stages in species wintering, migrating and breeding in cold environments (e.g., the Arctic). We tested this beneficial carryover hypothesis using outdoor captive Arctic-breeding...

Polar bears are inefficient predators of seabird eggs

Patrick Jagielski
Climate-mediated sea-ice loss is disrupting the foraging ecology of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) across much of their range. As a result, there have been increased reports of polar bears foraging on seabird eggs across parts of their range. Given that polar bears have evolved to hunt seals on ice, they may not be efficient predators of seabird eggs. We investigated bears’ foraging performance on common eider (Somateria mollissima) eggs on Mitivik Island, Nunavut, Canada to...

Population differences in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) DNA methylation: genetic drift and environmental factors

Clare Venney, Ben Sutherland, Terry D. Beacham & Daniel Heath
Local adaptation and phenotypic differences among populations have been reported in many species, though most studies focus on either neutral or adaptive genetic differentiation. With the discovery of DNA methylation, questions have arisen about its contribution to individual variation in and among natural populations. Previous studies have identified differences in methylation among populations of organisms, although most to date have been in plants and model animal species. Here we obtained eyed eggs from eight populations...

Muscle fiber size, myonuclear domain, and fat mass phenotypes in pre-migratory snow buntings

François Vézina, Ryan O'Connor, Audrey Le Pogam, Aliyah De Jesus, Oliver Love & Ana Jimenez
In long-distance migrants, preparation for migration is typically associated with increases in fat and body mass, and with an enlargement of pectoralis muscle mass that likely improves flight performance. Although changes in muscle mass or size have been well described in migratory birds, potential changes in muscle ultrastructure during this transition still deserves scrutiny. Using outdoor captive snow buntings (Plectrophenax nivalis n = 15) measured during their transition into a spring migratory phenotype as a...

A deep dive into fat: Investigating blubber lipidomics fingerprint of killer whales and humpback whales in northern Norway

Pierre Bories, Audun Rikardsen, Pim Leonards, Aaron Fisk, Sabrina Tartu, Emma Vogel, Jenny Bytingsvik & Pierre Blevin
In cetaceans, blubber is the primary and largest lipid body reservoir. Our current understanding about lipid stores and uses in cetaceans is still limited and most studies only focused on a single narrow snapshot of the lipidome. We documented an extended lipidomics fingerprint in two cetacean species present in northern Norway during wintertime. We were able to detect 817 molecular lipid species in blubber of killer whales (Orcinus orca) and humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae). The...

Passive acoustic records of Lake Sturgeon calling activity in Detroit River

Dennis Higgs & Riley Beach
Lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) are endangered in the Laurentian Great Lakes with increasing binational efforts to establish spawning grounds to aid restoration. While SCUBA surveys can document spawning activity, these are labour-intensive and may disrupt spawning. We used passive acoustic monitoring to quantify spawning sounds of lake sturgeon as a first step to developing remote sensing of sturgeon spawning grounds. Acipenser sp. are known to make a variety of sounds including, “thunders” (aka drums), which...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • University of Windsor
    9
  • Université du Québec à Rimouski
    2
  • Bernardino Rivadavia Natural Sciences Museum
    1
  • University of North Georgia
    1
  • Water Research Institute
    1
  • VU University Amsterdam
    1
  • Queen's University Belfast
    1
  • National University of Salta
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    1