19 Works

Data from: Soil biotic quality lacks spatial structure and is positively associated with fertility in a northern grassland

Pierre-Luc Chagnon, Charlotte Brown, Gisela C. Stotz & James F. Cahill
When placing roots in the soil, plants integrate information about soil nutrients, plant neighbours and beneficial/detrimental soil organisms. While the fine-scale spatial heterogeneity in soil nutrients and plant neighbours have been described previously, virtually nothing is known about the spatial structure in soil biotic quality (measured here as a soil Biota-Induced plant Growth Response, or BIGR), or its correlation with nutrients or neighbours. Such correlations could imply trade-offs in root placement decisions. Theory would predict...

Data from: Woody climbers show greater population genetic differentiation than trees: insights into the link between ecological traits and diversification

Ernesto Gianoli, Cristian Torres-Diaz, Eduardo Ruiz, Cristian Salgado-Luarte, Marco A. Molina-Montenegro, Alfredo Saldaña & Rodrigo S. Ríos
The climbing habit is a key innovation in plants: climbing taxa have higher species richness than non-climbing sister groups. We evaluated the hypothesis that climbing plant species show greater among-population genetic differentiation than non-climber species. We compared the among-population genetic distance in woody climbers (8 species, 30 populations) and trees (7 species, 29 populations) coexisting in 9 communities in a temperate rainforest. We also compared within-population genetic diversity in co-occurring woody climbers and trees in...

Not a melting pot: plant species aggregate in their non-native range

Gisela C. Stotz, James F. Cahill, Jonathan A. Bennett, Cameron N. Carlyle, Edward W. Bork, Diana Askarizadeh, Sandor Bartha, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Bazartseren Boldgiv, Leslie Brown, Marcelo Cabido, Giandiego Campetella, Stefano Chelli, Ofer Cohen, Sandra Díaz, Lucas Enrico, David Ensing, Batdelger Erdenetsetseg, Alessandra Fidelis, Heath W. Garris, Hugh A.L. Henry, Anke Jentsch, Mohammad Hassan Jouri, Kadri Koorem, Peter Manning … & Lauchlan H. Fraser
Aim: Plant species continue to be moved outside of their native range by human activities. Here, we aim at determining whether, once introduced, plants assimilate into native communities, or whether they aggregate, thus forming mosaics of native- and alien-rich communities. Alien species may aggregate in their non-native range due to shared habitat preferences, such as their tendency to establish in high-biomass, species-poor areas. Location: 22 herbaceous grasslands in 14 countries, mainly in the temperate zone....

Species interactions across trophic levels mediate rainfall effects on dryland vegetation dynamics

Douglas Kelt, Julio Gutiérrez & Peter Meserve
Arid ecosystems are strongly limited by water availability, and precipitation plays a major role in the dynamics of all species in arid regions, as well as the ecosystem processes that occur there. However, understanding how biotic interactions mediate long-term responses of dryland ecosystems to rainfall remains very fragmented. We report on a unique large-scale field experiment spanning 25 years and three trophic levels (plants, small mammal herbivores, predators) in a dryland ecosystem in the northern...

Data from: Genetic variation of loci potentially under selection confounds species-genetic diversity correlations in a fragmented habitat

Angeline Bertin, Nicolas Gouin, Alex Baumel, Ernesto Gianoli, Juan Serratosa, Rodomiro Osorio & Stéphanie Manel
Positive species-genetic diversity correlations (SGDCs) are often thought to result from the parallel influence of neutral processes on genetic and species diversity. Yet, confounding effects of non-neutral mechanisms have not been explored. Here, we investigate the impact of non-neutral genetic diversity on SGDCs in high Andean wetlands. We compare correlations between plant species diversity (SD) and genetic diversity (GD) calculated with and without loci potentially under selection (outlier loci). The study system includes 2188 specimens...

Phenotypic plasticity may mediate habitat filtering in a forest edge community

Ernesto Gianoli & Víctor Escobedo
A key process determining community assembly is habitat filtering, which reduces the range of trait values and thus leads to trait convergence. Habitat filtering is often assumed to involve a reduction in species richness, but such trait convergence could also result from phenotypic plasticity. By allowing more species in the community to show the “right” phenotype and pass the filter, phenotypic plasticity could maintain species richness despite trait convergence. If phenotypic plasticity plays this role,...

Phenotypic plasticity and the leaf economics spectrum: plasticity is positively associated with specific leaf area

Gisela C. Stotz, Gisela Stotz, Cristian Salgado-Luarte, Víctor Escobedo, Fernando Valladares & Ernesto Gianoli
Phenotypic plasticity is a key mechanism by which plants respond to changing or heterogeneous conditions. Efforts to predict phenotypic plasticity across plant species have mainly focused on environmental variability or abiotic conditions, i.e., site characteristics. However, the considerable variation in phenotypic plasticity within sites calls for alternative approaches. Different functional groups are thought to differ in their plasticity levels. Further, traits such as leaf specific area (SLA), leaf area (LA) and maximum photosynthetic rate (Amax)...

Data from: Environmental heterogeneity leads to higher plasticity in dry-edge populations of a semiarid Chilean shrub: insights into climate change responses

Ana Lázaro-Nogal, Silvia Matesanz, Alice Godoy, Fernanda Pérez-Trautman, Ernesto Gianoli & Fernando Valladares
1.Interannual variability in climatic conditions should be taken into account in climate change studies in semiarid ecosystems. It may determine differentiation in phenotypic plasticity among populations, with populations experiencing higher environmental heterogeneity showing higher levels of plasticity. 2.The ability of populations to evolve key functional traits and plasticity may determine the survival of plant populations under the drier and more variable climate expected for semiarid ecosystems. 3.Working with populations of the semiarid Chilean shrub Senna...

Data from: Fruit size determines the role of three scatter-hoarding rodents as dispersers or seed predators of a fleshy-fruited Atacama Desert shrub

Andrea Loayza, Claudia Luna, Francisco Squeo, Claudia A. Luna, Andrea P. Loayza & Francisco A. Squeo
Scatter-hoarding rodents can act as both predators and dispersers for many large-seeded plants because they cache seeds for future use, but occasionally forget them in sites with high survival and establishment probabilities. The most important fruit or seed trait influencing rodent foraging behavior is seed size; rodents prefer large seeds because they have higher nutritional content, but this preference can be counterbalanced by the higher costs of handling larger seeds. We designed a cafeteria experiment...

Data from: Are pulp consumers effective seed dispersers? Tests with a large-seeded tropical relict tree

Mara Peña-Egaña, Andrea P. Loayza & Francisco A. Squeo
Several plant species in the Neotropics bear large, fleshy fruits that suggest adaptation to endozoochorous seed dispersal by large vertebrates. Many of these plants, however, occur in areas where large vertebrates are no longer present, consequently, their seeds are dispersed by pulp consumers; small vertebrates that only ingest the pulp reward because they are uncapable of swallowing the fruits whole. Few studies have examined the role of these pulp consumers on the regeneration of large-fruited/seeded...

Data from: What controls variation in carbon use efficiency among Amazonian tropical forests?

Christopher E. Doughty, Gregory R. Goldsmith, Nicolas Raab, Cecile A. J. Girardin, Filio Farfan-Amezquita, Walter Huaraca Huasco, Javier E. Silva-Espejo, Alejandro Araujo-Murakami, Antonio C. L. Da Costa, Wanderley Rocha, David Galbraith, Patrick Meir, Dan B. Metcalfe, Yadvinder Malhi & Walter Huaraca-Huasco
Why do some forests produce biomass more efficiently than others? Variations in Carbon Use Efficiency (CUE: total Net Primary Production (NPP)/ Gross Primary Production (GPP)) may be due to changes in wood residence time (Biomass/NPPwood), temperature, or soil nutrient status. We tested these hypotheses in 14, one ha plots across Amazonian and Andean forests where we measured most key components of net primary production (NPP: wood, fine roots, and leaves) and autotrophic respiration (Ra; wood,...

Leaf resistance traits influence endophytic fungi colonization and community composition in a South American temperate rainforest

Marcia González-Teuber, Guevara-Araya María José, Vilo Claudia, Salgado-Luarte Cristian & Gianoli Ernesto
Despite the ubiquitous presence of fungal endophytes in woody plants, mechanisms underlying variation in foliar fungal endophyte communities are poorly understood. Given that endophytes in woody plants are predominantly horizontally transmitted, fungal endophyte colonization of foliar tissues is likely to be influenced by plant resistance traits. Here, we evaluated the association between leaf resistance traits and colonization and community composition of horizontally transmitted endophytes (HTE) in ten dominant trees species in a temperate rainforest in...

Data from: Energy expenditure and body size are targets of natural selection across a wide geographic range, in a terrestrial invertebrate

José Luis Bartheld, Juan Diego Gaitán-Espitia, Paulina Artacho, Cristian Salgado-Luarte, Ernesto Gianoli & Roberto F. Nespolo
One of the central questions in evolutionary ecology is how different functional capacities impact fitness, and how it varies across populations. For instance, do phenotypic attributes influence fitness similarly across geographic gradients? Which traits (physiological, morphological, life history) are most likely to be targets of natural selection? Do particular combinations of traits maximize fitness? In a semi-natural experiment, we analyzed introduced populations of an invasive species, the garden snail (Cornu aspersum) in Chile, which show...

Data from: Interspecific geographic range size–body size relationship and the diversification dynamics of Neotropical Furnariid birds

Oscar Inostroza-Michael, Cristián E. Hernández, Enrique Rodríguez-Serrano, Jorge Avaria-Llautureo & Marcelo M. Rivadeneira
Among the earliest macroecological patterns documented, is the range and body size relationship, characterized by a minimum geographic range size imposed by the species' body size. This boundary for the geographic range size increases linearly with body size and has been proposed to have implications in lineages evolution and conservation. Nevertheless, the macroevolutionary processes involved in the origin of this boundary and its consequences on lineage diversification has been poorly explored. We evaluate the macroevolutionary...

Surface indicators are correlated with soil multifunctionality in global drylands

David Eldridge, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, José Luis Quero, Victoria Ochoa, Beatriz Gonzalo, Pablo García-Palacios, Cristina Escolar, Miguel Garcia-Gomez, Laura Beinticinco, Matthew Bowker, Donaldo Bran, Ignacio Castro, Alex Cea, Mchich Derak, Carlos Ivan Espinosa, Adriana Fronertino, Juan Gaitán, Gabriel Gatica, Susana Gómez-González, Wahida Ghiloufi, Julio Gutierrez, Elizabeth Gusmán-M., Rosa Hernandez, Frederic Hughes, Walter Muiño … & Fernando Maestre
1. Multiple ecosystem functions need to be considered simultaneously to manage and protect the many ecosystem services that are essential to people and their environments. Despite this, cost effective, tangible, relatively simple, and globally-relevant methodologies to monitor in situ soil multifunctionality, i.e. the provision of multiple ecosystem functions by soils, have not been tested at the global scale. 2. We combined correlation analysis and structural equation modelling to explore whether we could find easily measured,...

Predators and dispersers: Context-dependent outcomes of the interactions between rodents and a megafaunal fruit plant

Andrea Loayza, Claudia Luna & Maria Calviño-Cancela
Many plant species bear fruits that suggest adaptation to seed dispersal by extinct megafauna. Present-day seed dispersal of these megafaunal plants is carried out by rodents, which can act as predators or dispersers; whether this interaction is primarily positive or negative can depend on the context. Here, we parameterized a stochastic model using data from the field and experimental arenas to estimate the effect of rodents on the recruitment of Myrcianthes coquimbensis -an Atacama Desert...

Relative effects of climate and litter traits on decomposition change with time, climate and trait variability

Rafaella Canessa, Liesbeth Van Den Brink, Alfredo Saldana, Rodrigo Rios, Stephan Hattenschwiler, Carsten Mueller, Isabel Prater, Katja Tielboerger & Maaike Bader
Climate and litter quality drive litter decomposition, but there is currently little consensus on their relative importance, likely because studies differ in the duration, the climatic gradients, and variability in litter-trait values. Understanding these drivers is important because they determine the direct and indirect (via vegetation composition) effects of climate change on decomposition and thereby on carbon and nutrient cycling. We studied how microclimate (soil moisture and temperature) and litter traits interactively affect litter mass...

Interactive effects of shading and disturbance on plant invasion in an arid shrubland: assembly processes and CSR-strategies

Víctor Escobedo, Rodrigo Rios & Ernesto Gianoli
Disturbance by small mammals and shrub canopies are ecological factors typical of arid ecosystems that may influence plant invasion through environmental and community changes. Whereas disturbance beneath shrub canopies may promote invasion by removing dominant species, disturbance in open areas may hinder plant invasion by increasing environmental harshness. However, we are unaware of studies explicitly addressing the interactive effects of disturbance by mammals and shading by shrubs on community assembly processes to understand plant invasion....

Trait functional diversity explains mixture effects on litter decomposition at the arid end of a climate gradient

Rafaella Canessa, Liesbeth Van Den Brink, Monica Berdugo, Stephan Hattenschwiler, Rodrigo Rios, Alfredo Saldana, Katja Tielboerger & Maaike Bader
Litter decomposition is controlled by climate, litter quality and decomposer communities. Because the decomposition of specific litter types is also influenced by the properties of adjacent types, mixing litter types may result in non-additive effects on overall decomposition rates. The strength of these effects seems to depend on the litter functional diversity. However, it is unclear which functional traits or combination of traits explain litter mixture effects and if these depend on the range of...

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