12 Works

Data from: Humpback whales feed on hatchery-released juvenile salmon

Ellen M. Chenoweth, Janice M. Straley, Megan V. McPhee, Shannon Atkinson, Steve Reifenstuhl & Ellen Chenoweth
Humpback whales are remarkable for the behavioural plasticity of their feeding tactics and the diversity of their diets. Within the last decade at hatchery release sites in Southeast Alaska, humpback whales have begun exploiting juvenile salmon, a previously undocumented prey. The anthropogenic source of these salmon and their important contribution to local fisheries makes the emergence of humpback whale predation a concern for the Southeast Alaska economy. Here, we describe the frequency of observing humpback...

Data from: Effects of developmental conditions on growth, stress, and telomeres in black-legged kittiwake chicks

Rebecca C. Young, Jorg Welcker, Christopher P. Barger, Scott A. Hatch, Thomas Merkling, Evgenia V. Kitaiskaia, Mark F. Haussmann & Alexander S. Kitaysky
Early-life conditions can drive ageing patterns and life history strategies throughout the lifespan. Certain social, genetic, and nutritional developmental conditions are more likely to produce high-quality offspring: those with good likelihood of recruitment and productivity. Here we call such conditions “favored states” and explore their relationship with physiological variables during development in a long-lived seabird, the black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla). Two favored states were experimentally generated by manipulation of food availability and brood size, while...

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Data from: Physiological, morphological, and ecological tradeoffs influence vertical habitat use of deep-diving toothed-whales in the Bahamas

Trevor W. Joyce, John W. Durban, Diane E. Claridge, Charlotte A. Dunn, Holly Fearnbach, Kim M. Parsons, Russel D. Andrews & Lisa T. Ballance
Dive capacity among toothed whales (suborder: Odontoceti) has been shown to generally increase with body mass in a relationship closely linked to the allometric scaling of metabolic rates. However, two odontocete species tagged in this study, the Blainville’s beaked whale Mesoplodon densirostris and the Cuvier’s beaked whale Ziphius cavirostris, confounded expectations of a simple allometric relationship, with exceptionally long (mean: 46.1 min & 65.4 min) and deep dives (mean: 1129 m & 1179 m), and...

Data from: A new genus of horse from Pleistocene North America

Peter D. Heintzman, Grant D. Zazula, Ross D.E. MacPhee, Eric Scott, James A. Cahill, Brianna K. McHorse, Joshua D. Kapp, Mathias Stiller, Matthew J. Wooller, Ludovic Orlando, John R. Southon, Duane G. Froese, Beth Shapiro & John Southon
The extinct “New World stilt-legged”, or NWSL, equids constitute a perplexing group of Pleistocene horses endemic to North America. Their slender distal limb bones resemble those of Asiatic asses, such as the Persian onager. Previous palaeogenetic studies, however, have suggested a closer relationship to caballine horses than to Asiatic asses. Here, we report complete mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomes from NWSL equids from across their geographic range. Although multiple NWSL equid species have been named,...

Data from: Form–function relationships in a marine foundation species depend on scale: a shoot to global perspective from a distributed ecological experiment

Jennifer L. Ruesink, John J. Stachowicz, Pamela L. Reynolds, Christoffer Boström, Mathieu Cusson, James Douglass, Johan Eklöf, Aschwin H. Engelen, Masakazu Hori, Kevin Hovel, Katrin Iken, Per-Olav Moksnes, Masahiro Nakaoka, Mary I. O'Connor, Jeanine L. Olsen, Erik E. Sotka, Matthew A. Whalen & Emmett J. Duffy
Form-function relationships in plants underlie their ecosystem roles in supporting higher trophic levels through primary production, detrital pathways, and habitat provision. For widespread, phenotypically-variable plants, productivity may differ not only across abiotic conditions, but also from distinct morphological or demographic traits. A single foundation species, eelgrass (Zostera marina), typically dominates north temperate seagrass meadows, which we studied across 14 sites spanning 32-61° N latitude and two ocean basins. Body size varied by nearly two orders...

Data from: Development, validation, and evaluation of an assay for the detection of wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) in environmental DNA

Mark A. Spangler, Falk Huettmann, Ian C. Herriott & J. Andrés López
We developed and describe a qPCR assay for the detection of wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) using environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling. A single primer set was designed to amplify a 115-bp region of the wood frog cytochrome B gene and assessed for target specificity. There was no evidence of amplification in 11 non-target species. We evaluated the utility of the primer set in qPCR assay by conducting geo-referenced eDNA field surveys in Interior Alaska. Results indicate...

Data from: Limited stand expansion by a long-lived conifer at a leading northern range edge, despite available habitat

John Krapek & Brian Buma
1. In an era of rapid climate change, understanding the natural capacity of species’ ranges to track shifting climatic niches is a critical research and conservation need. Because species do not move across the landscape through empty space, but instead have to migrate through existing biotic communities, basic dispersal ecology and biotic interactions are important considerations beyond simple climate niche tracking. 2. Yellow-cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis), a long-lived conifer of the North Pacific coastal temperate rainforest...

Data from: Accommodating temporary emigration in spatial distance sampling models

Jeremy D. Mizel, Joshua H. Schmidt & Mark S. Lindberg
1.Model-based distance sampling is commonly used to understand spatial variation in the density of wildlife species. The standard approach assumes that individuals are distributed uniformly and models spatial variation in density using plot-level effects. Thinned point process (TPP) models for surveys of unmarked populations (spatial distance sampling) better leverage the spatial information underlying individual encounters, and in the presence of within-plot variation in density, may explain a larger proportion of the spatial variation in density....

Data from: Development of a genotype-by-sequencing immunogenetic assay as exemplified by screening for variation in red fox with and without endemic rabies exposure

Michael E. Donaldson, Yessica Rico, Karsten Hueffer, Halie M. Rando, Anna V. Kukekova & Christopher J. Kyle
Pathogens are recognized as major drivers of local adaptation in wildlife systems. By determining which gene variants are favored in local interactions among populations with and without disease, spatially explicit adaptive responses to pathogens can be elucidated. Much of our current understanding of host responses to disease comes from a small number of genes associated with an immune response. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies, such as genotype-by-sequencing (GBS), facilitate expanded explorations of genomic variation among populations....

Data from: Pollination context alters female advantage in gynodioecious Silene vulgaris

James D. Stone & Matthew S. Olson
Gynodioecy, the co-occurrence of females and hermaphrodites, is arguably the most common angiosperm gender polymorphism in many florae. Females’ ability to invade and persist among hermaphrodites depends, in part, on pollinators providing adequate pollination to females. We directly measured diurnal and nocturnal pollinators’ contributions to female and hermaphrodite seed production in artificial populations of gynodioecious Silene vulgaris by experimentally restricting pollinator access. We found that female relative seed production in this system depended strongly on...

Data from: Early-branching euteleost relationships: areas of congruence between concatenation and coalescent model inferences

Matthew A. Campbell, Michael E. Alfaro, Max Belasco & J. Andrés López
Phylogenetic inference based on evidence from DNA sequences has led to significant strides in the development of a stable and robustly supported framework for the vertebrate tree of life. To date, the bulk of those advances have relied on sequence data from a small number of genome regions that have proven unable to produce satisfactory answers to consistently recalcitrant phylogenetic questions. Here, we re-examine phylogenetic relationships among early-branching euteleostean fish lineages classically grouped in the...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • University of Alaska Fairbanks
    12
  • University of California System
    3
  • University of Alaska Southeast
    2
  • Harvard University
    2
  • CIUDAD
    1
  • College of Charleston
    1
  • National Oceanography Centre
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • University of Newcastle Australia
    1
  • Spanish Institute of Oceanography
    1