132 Works

Data from: Climate outweighs native vs. non-native range-effects for genetics and common garden performance of a cosmopolitan weed

Christoph Rosche, Isabell Hensen, Adrian Schaar, Uzma Zehra, Marie Jasieniuk, Ragan M. Callaway, Damase P. Khasa, Mohammad M. Al-Gharaibeh, Ylva Lekberg, David U. Nagy, Robert W. Pal, Miki Okada, Karin Schrieber, Kathryn G. Turner, Susanne Lachmuth, Andrey Erst, Tomonori Tsunoda, Min Sheng, Robin Schmidt, Yanling Peng, Wenbo Luo, Yun Jäschke, Zafar A. Reshi & Manzoor A. Shah
Comparing genetic diversity, genetic differentiation and performance between native and non-native populations has advanced our knowledge of contemporary evolution and its ecological consequences. However, such between-range comparisons can be complicated by high among-population variation within native and non-native ranges. For example, native vs. non-native comparisons between small and non-representative subsets of populations for species with very large distributions have the potential to mislead because they may not sufficiently account for within-range adaptation to climatic conditions,...

Data used in: \"Impacts of predator-mediated interactions along a climatic gradient on the population dynamics of an alpine bird\"

Diana Bowler, Mikkel Kvasnes, Hans Pedersen, Brett Sandercock & Erlend Nilsen
Data for: Impacts of predator-mediated interactions along a climatic gradient on the population dynamics of an alpine bird doi: 10.1098/rspb.2020.2653 Diana E. Bowler, Mikkel A. J. Kvasnes, Hans C. Pedersen, Brett K. Sandercock, Erlend B. Nilsen Questions to: diana.e.bowler@gmail.com or erlend.nilsen@nina.no

Data from: Exploratory and confirmatory research in the open science era

Erlend B. Nilsen, Diana Bowler & John Linnell
1. Applied ecological research is increasingly inspired by the Open Science movement. However, new challenges about how we define our science when biodiversity data is being shared and re-used are not solved. Among these challenges is the risk associated with blurring the distinction between research that mainly seeks to explore patterns with no a-priori articulated hypotheses (exploratory research), and research that explicitly tests a-priori formulated hypotheses (confirmatory research). 2. A rapid screening of a random...

Ecological traps and species distribution models: a challenge for prioritizing areas of conservation importance

Nicolas Titeux, Olatz Aizpurua, Franck Hollander, Francesc Sardà-Palomera, Virgilio Hermoso, Jean-Yves Paquet, Xavier Mestdagh, Josef Settele, Lluís Brotons & Hans Van Dyck
Species distribution models analyse how species use different types of habitats. Their spatial predictions are often used to prioritize areas for conservation. Individuals may, however, prefer settling in habitat types of low quality compared to other available habitats. This ecological trap phenomenon is usually studied in a small number of habitat patches and consequences at the landscape level are largely unknown. It is therefore often unclear whether the spatial pattern of habitat use is aligned...

Data from Soil chemistry turned upside down: a meta-analysis of invasive earthworm effects on soil chemical properties

Olga Ferlian, Madhav P. Thakur, Alejandra Castañeda González, Layla M. San Emeterio, Susanne Marr, Barbbara Da Silva Rocha & Nico Eisenhauer
Recent studies have shown that invasive earthworms can dramatically reduce native biodiversity, both above and below the ground. However, we still lack a synthetic understanding of the underlying mechanisms behind these changes, such as whether earthworm effects on soil chemical properties drive such relationships. Here, we investigated the effects of invasive earthworms on soil chemical properties (pH, water content, and the stocks and fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus) by conducting a meta-analysis. Invasive earthworms...

Data from: Parasitoid wasps indirectly suppress seed production by stimulating consumption rates of their seed-feeding hosts

Xinqiang Xi, Nico Eisenhauer & Sun Shucun
1. In parasitoid–herbivore–plant food chains, parasitoids may be simultaneously linked with both herbivore hosts and plants, as occurs when herbivores attacked by parasitoids continue to consume plants although they are destined to die. This peculiar property may cause parasitoids to confer a differential trophic cascading effect on plants than that known for typical predators. 2. We hypothesized that larval koinobiont parasitoids would confer an immediate negative effect on plant seed production by stimulating consumption of...

Data from: Role of multiple invasion mechanisms and their interaction in regulating the population dynamics of an exotic tree

Raelene M. Crandall & Tiffany M. Knight
Understanding the mechanisms that allow exotic species to have rapid population growth is an important step in the process of controlling existing invasions and preventing future invasions. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain why some exotic species become invasive, the most prominent of which focus on the roles of habitat disturbance, competitors and consumers. The magnitude and direction of each of these mechanisms on population dynamics observed in previous studies is quite variable. It...

Data from: Distance-dependent seedling mortality and long-term spacing dynamics in a neotropical forest community

Stephen J. Murphy, Thorsten Wiegand & Liza S. Comita
Negative distance dependence (NDisD), or reduced recruitment near adult conspecifics, is thought to explain the astounding diversity of tropical forests. While many studies show greater mortality at near vs. far distances from adults, these studies do not seek to track changes in the peak seedling curve over time, thus limiting our ability to link NDisD to coexistence. Using census data collected over 12 years from central Panama in conjunction with spatial mark-connection functions, we show...

Data from: Below-ground resource partitioning alone cannot explain the biodiversity–ecosystem function relationship: a field test using multiple tracers

Annette Jesch, Kathryn E. Barry, Janneke M. Ravenek, Dörte Bachmann, Tanja Strecker, Alexandra Weigelt, Nina Buchmann, Hans De Kroon, Arthur Gessler, Liesje Mommer, Christiane Roscher & Michael Scherer-Lorenzen
1. Belowground resource partitioning is among the most prominent hypotheses for driving the positive biodiversity-ecosystem function relationship. However, experimental tests of this hypothesis in biodiversity experiments are scarce, and the available evidence is not consistent. 2. We tested the hypothesis that resource partitioning in space, in time, or in both space and time combined drives the positive effect of diversity on both plant productivity and community resource uptake. At the community level, we predicted that...

Data from: Species richness change across spatial scales

Jonathan M. Chase, Brian J. McGill, Patrick L. Thompson, Laura H. Antão, Amanda E. Bates, Shane A. Blowes, Maria Dornelas, Andrew Gonzalez, Anne E. Magurran, Sarah R. Supp, Marten Winter, Anne D. Bjorkmann, Helge Bruelheide, Jarrett E.K. Byrnes, Juliano Sarmento Cabral, Robin Ehali, Catalina Gomez, Hector M. Guzman, Forest Isbell, Isla H. Myers-Smith, Holly P. Jones, Jessica Hines, Mark Vellend, Conor Waldock & Mary O'Connor
Humans have elevated global extinction rates and thus lowered global-scale species richness. However, there is no a priori reason to expect that losses of global species richness should always, or even often, trickle down to losses of species richness at regional and local scales, even though this relationship is often assumed. Here, we show that scale can modulate our estimates of species richness change through time in the face of anthropogenic pressures, but not in...

Data from: Soil drainage facilitates earthworm invasion and subsequent carbon loss from peatland soil

Xinwei Wu, Rui Cao, Xue Wei, Xinqiang Xi, Peili Shi, Nico Eisenhauer & Shucun Sun
1. Human activities have been a significant driver of environmental changes with tremendous consequences for carbon dynamics. Peatlands are critical ecosystems because they store ~30% of the global soil organic carbon pool and are particularly vulnerable to anthropogenic changes. The Zoige peatland on the eastern Tibet Plateau, as the largest alpine peatland in the world, accounts for 1‰ of global peat soil organic carbon storage. However, this peatland has experienced dramatic climate change including increased...

Data from: High specialization and limited structural change in plant‐herbivore networks along a successional chronosequence in tropical montane forest

Conor M. Redmond, John Auga, Bradley Gewa, Simon T. Segar, Scott E. Miller, Kenneth Molem, George D. Weiblen, Phillip T. Butterill, Gibson Maiyah, Amelia S.C. Hood, Martin Volf, Leonardo R. Jorge, Yves Basset, Vojtech Novotny, Philip T. Butterill & Amelia S. C. Hood
Secondary succession is well‐understood, to the point of being predictable for plant communities, but the successional changes in plant‐herbivore interactions remains poorly explored. This is particularly true for tropical forests, despite the increasing importance of early successional stages in tropical landscapes. Deriving expectations from successional theory, we examine properties of plant‐herbivore interaction networks while accounting for host phylogenetic structure along a succession chronosequence in montane rainforest in Papua New Guinea. We present one of the...

Data from: Cascading spatial and trophic impacts of oak decline on the soil food web

Jara Domínguez-Begines, Gerlinde B. De Deyn, Luis V. Garcia, Nico Eisenhauer & Lorena Gomez-Aparicio
1. Tree defoliation and mortality have considerably increased worldwide during the last decades due to global change drivers such as increasing drought or invasive pests and pathogens. However, the effects of this tree decline on soil food webs are poorly understood. 2. In this study we evaluated the impacts of Quercus suber decline on soil food webs of Mediterranean mixed forests invaded by the exotic oomycete pathogen Phytophthora cinnamomi, using soil nematodes as bioindicator taxa....

Data from: Stronger effect of gastropods than rodents on seedling establishment, irrespective of exotic or native plant species origin

Lotte Korell, Claudia Stein, Isabell Hensen, Helge Bruelheide, Katharine N. Suding & Harald Auge
Experimental evidence about how generalist consumers affect exotic plant invasions is equivocal, but most tests have been limited to few plant species, single herbivore guilds, and single locations. Using a seed-addition experiment, we studied effects of gastropods and rodents on recruitment success of 37 exotic and 37 native plant species affiliated to three different functional groups (i.e. grasses, legumes and non-legume herbs). We replicated our seed addition x herbivore exclusion experiment at multiple grassland sites,...

Invasive earthworm and native plant traits

Lise Thouvenot, Olga Ferlian, Rémy Beugnon, Tom Künne, Alfred Lochner, Madhav P. Thakur, Manfred Türke & Nico Eisenhauer

Data from: Tree species rather than type of mycorrhizal association drives inorganic and organic nitrogen acquisition in tree-tree interactions

Judy Simon, Robert Reuter, Olga Ferlian, Mika Tarkka, Nico Eisenhauer & Karin Pritsch
A field study was conducted to evaluate the effects of associated mycorrhization type on tree-tree interactions using the framework of the MyDiv tree diversity experiment established at the Bad Lauchstädt Experimental Research Station of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) (Saxony-Anhalt, Germany). Inorganic and organic net N uptake capacity was quantified in fine roots of AM (i.e. Acer pseudoplatanus L., Fraxinus excelsior L., and Prunus avium L.) as well as EM associated tree species...

Vulnerability of grassland seed banks to resource-enhancing global changes

Anu Eskelinen, Elise Elwood, Susan Harrison, Eva Beyen & Jennifer Gremer
Soil seed banks represent reservoirs of diversity in the soil that may increase resilience of communities to global changes. Two global change factors that can dramatically alter the composition and diversity of aboveground communities are nutrient enrichment and increased rainfall. In a full-factorial nutrient and rainfall addition experiment in an annual Californian grassland, we asked whether shifts in aboveground composition and diversity were reflected in belowground seed banks. Nutrient and rainfall additions increased exotic and...

Changes in salt marsh detritivore identity influences on ecosystem multifunctionality

Jes Hines
Ecosystems world-wide experience changes in species composition in response to natural and anthropogenic changes in environmental conditions. Research to date has greatly improved our understanding of how species affect focal ecosystem functions. However, because measurements of multiple ecosystem functions have not been consistently justified for any given trophic group, it is unclear whether interpretations of research syntheses adequately reflect the contributions of consumers to ecosystems. Using model communities assembled in experimental microcosms, we examined the...

In the eye of the beholder: Is color classification consistent amongst human observers?

Kim Valenta, Sally Bornbusch, Yan-Daniel Jacques & Omer Nevo
Colorful displays have evolved in multiple plant and animal species as signals to mutualists, antagonists, competitors, mates, and other potential receivers. Studies of color have long relied on subjective classifications of color by human observers. However, humans have a limited ability to perceive color compared to other animals, and human biological, cultural, and environmental variables can influence color perception. Here, we test the consistency of human color classification using fruit color as a model system....

Data for: Environmental and anthropogenic constraints on animal space use drive extinction risk worldwide

Myriam R. Hirt, Andrew D. Barnes, Alessandro Gentile, Laura J. Pollock, Benjamin Rosenbaum, Wilfried Thuiller, Marlee A. Tucker & Ulrich Brose
Animals require a certain amount of habitat to persist and thrive, and habitat loss is one of the most critical drivers of global biodiversity decline. While habitat requirements have been predicted by relationships between species traits and home range size, little is known about constraints imposed by environmental conditions and human impacts on a global scale. Our meta-analysis of 395 vertebrate species shows that global climate gradients in temperature and precipitation exert indirect effects via...

Effects of large herbivores on fire regimes and wildfire mitigation

Julia Rouet-Leduc, Guy Pe'er, Francisco Moreira, Aletta Bonn, Wouter Helmer, S. Alain Aidan Shahsavan Zadeh, Alexander Zizka & Fons Van Der Plas
1. Abandonment of agricultural land is widespread in many parts of the world, leading to shrub and tree encroachment. The increase of flammable plant biomass, i.e. fuel load, increases the risk and intensity of wildfires. Fuel reduction by herbivores is a promising management strategy to avoid fuel build-up and mitigate wildfires. However, their effectiveness in mitigating wildfire damage may depend on a range of factors, including herbivore type, population density and feeding patterns. 2. Here...

Environmental heterogeneity predicts global species richness patterns better than area

Kristy Udy, Matthias Fritsch, Katrin Meyer, Ingo Grass, Sebastian Hanß, Florian Hartig, Thomas Kneib, Hoger Kreft, Collins Kukuna, Guy Pe'er, Hannah Reininghaus, Britta Tietjen, Clara-Sophie Van Waveren, Kerstin Wiegand & Teja Tscharntke
Aim: It is widely accepted that biodiversity can be determined by niche-relate processes and by pure area effects from local to global scales. Their relative importance, however, is still disputed, and empirical tests are still surprisingly scarce at the global scale. We compare the explanatory power of area and environmental heterogeneity as a proxy for niche-related processes as drivers of native mammal species richnessworldwide and with biogeographical regions. Location: Global Time Period: Data was collated...

Data from: Temporal scale-dependence of plant-pollinator networks

Benjamin Schwarz, Diego Vázquez, Paul CaraDonna, Tiffany Knight, Gita Benadi, Carsten Dormann, Benoit Gauzens, Elena Motivans, Julian Resasco, Nico Blüthgen, Laura Burkle, Qiang Fang, Christopher Kaiser-Bunbury, Ruben Alarcón, Justin Bain, Natacha Chacoff, Shuang-Quan Huang, Gretchen LeBuhn, Molly MacLeod, Theodora Petanidou, Claus Rasmussen, Michael Simanonok, Amibeth Thompson, Daniel Cariveau, Michael Roswell … & Jochen Fründ
The study of mutualistic interaction networks has led to valuable insights into ecological and evolutionary processes. However, our understanding of network structure may depend upon the temporal scale at which we sample and analyze network data. To date, we lack a comprehensive assessment of the temporal scale-dependence of network structure across a wide range of temporal scales and geographic locations. If network structure is temporally scale-dependent, networks constructed over different temporal scales may provide very...

Plant history and soil history jointly influence the selection environment for plant species in a long-term grassland biodiversity experiment

Peter Dietrich, Nico Eisenhauer, Peter Otto & Christiane Roscher
Long-term biodiversity experiments have shown increasing strengths of biodiversity effects on plant productivity over time. However, little is known about rapid evolutionary processes in response to plant community diversity, which could contribute to explaining the strengthening positive relationship. To address this issue, we performed a transplant experiment with offspring of seeds collected from four grass species in a 14-year old biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment). We used two- and six-species communities and removed the vegetation of...

Data from: Chemical novelty facilitates herbivore resistance and biological invasions in some introduced plant species

Brian Sedio, John Devaney, Jamie Pullen, Geoffrey Parker, S. Joseph Wright & John Parker
Ecological release from herbivory due to chemical novelty is commonly predicted to facilitate biological invasions by plants, but has not been tested on a community scale. We used metabolomics based on mass spectrometry molecular networks to assess the novelty of foliar secondary chemistry of 15 invasive plant species compared to 46 native species at a site in eastern North America. Locally, invasive species were more chemically distinctive than natives. Among the 15 invasive species, the...

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