153 Works

Data from: The influence of balanced and imbalanced resource supply on biodiversity-functioning relationship across ecosystems

Aleksandra M. Lewandowska, Antje Biermann, Elizabeth T. Borer, Miguel A. Cebrian-Piqueras, Steven A. J. Declerck, Luc De Meester, Ellen Van Donk, Lars Gamfeldt, Daniel S. Gruner, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Kevin P. Kirkman, Christopher A. Klausmeier, Michael Kleyer, Johannes M. H. Knops, Pieter Lemmens, Eric M. Lind, Elena Litchman, Jasmin Mantilla-Contreras, Koen Martens, Sandra Meier, Vanessa Minden, Joslin L. Moore, Harry Olde Venterink, Eric W. Seabloom … & Helmut Hillebrand
Numerous studies show that increasing species richness leads to higher ecosystem productivity. This effect is often attributed to more efficient portioning of multiple resources in communities with higher numbers of competing species, indicating the role of resource supply and stoichiometry for biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships. Here, we merged theory on ecological stoichiometry with a framework of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning to understand how resource use transfers into primary production. We applied a structural equation model to define patterns...

Data from: Elevated virulence of an emerging viral genotype as a driver of honeybee loss

Dino P. McMahon, Myrsini E. Natsopoulou, Vincent Doublet, Matthias Fürst, Silvio Weging, Mark J. F. Brown, Andreas Gogol-Döring & Robert J. Paxton
Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) have contributed significantly to the current biodiversity crisis, leading to widespread epidemics and population loss. Owing to genetic variation in pathogen virulence, a complete understanding of species decline requires the accurate identification and characterization of EIDs. We explore this issue in the Western honeybee, where increasing mortality of populations in the Northern Hemisphere has caused major concern. Specifically, we investigate the importance of genetic identity of the main suspect in mortality,...

Data from: Fitting functional responses: direct parameter estimation by simulating differential equations

Benjamin Rosenbaum & Björn Christian Rall
1. The feeding functional response is one of the most widespread mathematical frameworks in Ecology, Marine Biology, Freshwater Biology, Microbiology and related scientific fields describing the resource-dependent uptake of a consumer. Since the exact knowledge of its parameters is crucial to predict, for example, the efficiency of biocontrol agents, population dynamics, food web structure and subsequently biodiversity, a trustworthy parameter estimation method is highly important for scientists using this framework. Classical approaches for estimating functional...

Data from: Testing the validity of functional response models using molecular gut content analysis for prey choice in soil predators

Bernhard Eitzinger, Björn Rall, Michael Traugott & Stefan Scheu
Analysis of predator - prey interactions is a core concept of animal ecology, explaining structure and dynamics of animal food webs. Measuring the functional response, i.e. the intake rate of a consumer as a function of prey density, is a powerful method to predict the strength of trophic links and assess motives of prey choice, particularly in arthropod communities. However, due to their reductionist set-up, functional responses, which are based on laboratory feeding experiments, may...

Data from: Adaptive and non-adaptive evolution of trait means and genetic trait correlations for herbivory resistance and performance in an invasive plant

Karin Schrieber, Sabrina Wolf, Catherina Wypior, Diana Höhlig, Isabell Hensen & Susanne Lachmuth
The EICA-hypothesis predicts that invading plants adapt to their novel environment by evolving increased performance and reduced resistance in response to the release from natural enemies, and assumes a resource allocation tradeoff among both trait groups as mechanistic basis of this evolutionary change. Using the plant Silene latifolia as a study system, we tested these predictions by investigating whether 1) invasive populations evolved lower resistance and higher performance, 2) this evolutionary change is indeed adaptive,...

Data from: Inter- and intraspecific variation in leaf economics traits in wheat and maize

Adam R. Martin, Christine E. Hale, Bruno E. L. Cerabolini, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen, Joseph Craine, William A. Gough, Jens Kattge & Cairan K. F. Tirona
Leaf economics spectrum (LES) trait variation underpins multiple agroecological processes and many prominent crop yield models. While there are numerous independent studies assessing trait variation in crops, to date there have been no comprehensive assessments of intraspecific trait variation (ITV) in LES traits for wheat and maize: the world’s most widespread crops. Using trait databases and peer-reviewed literature, we compiled over 700 records of specific leaf area (SLA), maximum photosynthetic rates (Amax), and leaf nitrogen...

Data from: Temperature effects on prey and basal resources exceed that of predators in an experimental community

Madhav P. Thakur, John N. Griffin, Tom Künne, Susanne Dunker, Andrea Fanesi & Nico Eisenhauer
Climate warming alters the structure of ecological communities by modifying species interactions at different trophic levels. Yet, the consequences of warming-led modifications in biotic interactions at higher trophic levels on lower trophic groups are lesser known. Here, we test the effects of multiple predator species on prey population size and traits, and subsequent effects on basal resources along an experimental temperature gradient (12-15C, 17-20C, and 22-25C). We experimentally assembled food web modules with two congeneric...

Data from: Temperature and consumer type dependencies of energy flows in natural communities

Birgit Lang, Roswitha B. Ehnes, Ulrich Brose & Björn C. Rall
With the world continuously warming, a mechanistic understanding of how temperature affects interaction strengths, which are fundamental to food-web stability, is needed. As interaction strengths are determined by the flows of energy from resources to consumers, we investigated effects of temperature on animal energetics. We used newly compiled datasets on respiration rates and assimilation efficiencies to assess how temperature affects the energy use (respiration rates) and the efficiency of energy gain (assimilation efficiency) for different...

Data from: Patterns and correlates of claims for brown bear damage on a continental scale

Carlos Bautista, Javier Naves, Eloy Revilla, Néstor Fernández, Jörg Albrecht, Anne K. Scharf, Robin Rigg, Alexandros A. Karamanlidis, Klemen Jerina, Djuro Huber, Santiago Palazón, Raido Kont, Paolo Ciucci, Claudio Groff, Aleksandar Dutsov, Juan Seijas, Pierre-Ives Quenette, Agnieszka Olszańska, Maryna Shkvyria, Michal Adamec, Janis Ozolins, Marko Jonozovič & Nuria Selva
Wildlife damage to human property threatens human–wildlife coexistence. Conflicts arising from wildlife damage in intensively managed landscapes often undermine conservation efforts, making damage mitigation and compensation of special concern for wildlife conservation. However, the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of damage and claims at large scales are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the patterns of damage caused by brown bears Ursus arctos and its ecological and socio-economic correlates at a continental scale. We compiled information...

Data from: Individual behaviour mediates effects of warming on movement across a fragmented landscape

Andrew D. Barnes, Ina-Kathrin Spey, Lena Rohde, Ulrich Brose & Anthony I. Dell
Global warming and habitat fragmentation impose dramatic and potentially interactive impacts on ecosystems. Warming induces shifts in species' distributions as they track temperature changes, but this can be hindered in fragmented landscapes. Corridors connecting habitat patches might ameliorate the combined effects of fragmentation and global warming. Using novel automated tracking methods, the movement of woodlice (Oniscus asellus) ranging in body size from 15·3 to 108·6 mg was quantified across a temperature range from 15 to...

Data from: PalmTraits 1.0, a species-level functional trait database for palms worldwide

W. Daniel Kissling, Henrik Balslev, William J. Baker, John Dransfield, Bastian Göldel, Jun Ying Lim, Renske E. Onstein & Jens-Christian Svenning
Plant traits are critical to plant form and function —including growth, survival and reproduction— and therefore shape fundamental aspects of population and ecosystem dynamics as well as ecosystem services. Here, we present a global species-level compilation of key functional traits for palms (Arecaceae), a plant family with keystone importance in tropical and subtropical ecosystems. We derived measurements of essential functional traits for all (>2500) palm species from key sources such as monographs, books, other scientific...

Data from: Contrasting impacts of precipitation on Mediterranean birds and butterflies

Sergi Herrando, Nicolas Titeux, Lluís Brotons, Marc Anton, Andreu Ubach, Dani Villero, Enrique García-Barros, Miguel L. Munguira, Carlos Godinho & Constantí Stefanescu
The climatic preferences of the species determine to a large extent their response to climate change. Temperature preferences have been shown to play a key role in driving trends in animal populations. However, the relative importance of temperature and precipitation preferences is still poorly understood, particularly in systems where ecological processes are strongly constrained by the amount and timing of rainfall. In this study, we estimated the role played by temperature and precipitation preferences in...

Data from: Cascading effects of climate variability on the breeding success of an edge population of an apex predator

Laura Gangoso, Duarte Viana, Adriaan Dokter, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Jordi Figuerola, Sergio Barbosa & Willem Bouten
1. Large-scale environmental forces can influence biodiversity at different levels of biological organization. Climate, in particular, is often associated to species distributions and diversity gradients. However, its mechanistic link to population dynamics is still poorly understood. 2. Here, we unraveled the full mechanistic path by which a climatic driver, the Atlantic trade winds, determines the viability of a bird population. 3. We monitored the breeding population of Eleonora’s falcons in the Canary Islands for over...

Data from: The megaherbivore gap after the non-avian dinosaur extinctions modified trait evolution and diversification of tropical palms

Renske E. Onstein, W. Daniel Kissling & H. Peter Linder
The Cretaceous–Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs (66 Ma) led to a 25 million year gap of megaherbivores (>1000 kg) before the evolution of megaherbivorous mammals in the Late Eocene (40 Ma). The botanical consequences of this ‘Paleocene megaherbivore gap’ (PMHG) remain poorly explored. We hypothesize that the absence of megaherbivores should result in changes in the diversification and trait evolution of associated plant lineages. We used phylogenetic time- and trait-dependent diversification models with...

Data from: Chemical novelty facilitates herbivore resistance and biological invasions in some introduced plant species

Brian Sedio, John Devaney, Jamie Pullen, Geoffrey Parker, S. Joseph Wright & John Parker
Ecological release from herbivory due to chemical novelty is commonly predicted to facilitate biological invasions by plants, but has not been tested on a community scale. We used metabolomics based on mass spectrometry molecular networks to assess the novelty of foliar secondary chemistry of 15 invasive plant species compared to 46 native species at a site in eastern North America. Locally, invasive species were more chemically distinctive than natives. Among the 15 invasive species, the...

Environmental heterogeneity predicts global species richness patterns better than area

Kristy Udy, Matthias Fritsch, Katrin Meyer, Ingo Grass, Sebastian Hanß, Florian Hartig, Thomas Kneib, Hoger Kreft, Collins Kukuna, Guy Pe'er, Hannah Reininghaus, Britta Tietjen, Clara-Sophie Van Waveren, Kerstin Wiegand & Teja Tscharntke
Aim: It is widely accepted that biodiversity can be determined by niche-relate processes and by pure area effects from local to global scales. Their relative importance, however, is still disputed, and empirical tests are still surprisingly scarce at the global scale. We compare the explanatory power of area and environmental heterogeneity as a proxy for niche-related processes as drivers of native mammal species richnessworldwide and with biogeographical regions. Location: Global Time Period: Data was collated...

Diversification in evolutionary arenas – assessment and synthesis

Nicolai M. Nürk, H. Peter Linder, Renske E. Onstein, Matthew J. Larcombe, Colin E. Hughes, Laura Piñeiro Fernández, Philipp M. Schlüter, Luis Valente, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Vanessa Cutts, Michael J. Donoghue, Erika J. Edwards, Richard Field, Suzette G.A. Flantua, Steven I. Higgins, Anke Jentsch, Sigrid Liede-Schumann & Michael D. Pirie
Understanding how and why rates of evolutionary diversification vary is a central issue in evolutionary biology, ecology and biogeography. The concept of adaptive radiation has attracted much interest, but is metaphorical and verbal in nature, making it difficult to quantitatively compare different evolutionary lineages or geographic regions. In addition, the causes of evolutionary stasis are relatively neglected. Here we review the central concepts in the evolutionary diversification literature and bring these together by proposing a...

Palm fruit colours are linked to the broad-scale distribution and diversification of primate colour vision systems

Renske Onstein, Daphne Vink, Jorin Veen, Christopher Barratt, Suzette Flantua, Serge Wich & Daniel Kissling
A long-standing hypothesis in ecology and evolution is that trichromatic colour vision (the ability to distinguish red from green) in frugivorous primates has evolved as an adaptation to detect conspicuous (reddish) fruits. This could provide a competitive advantage over dichromatic frugivores which cannot distinguish reddish colours from a background of green foliage. Here, we test whether the origin, distribution and diversity of trichromatic primates is positively associated with the availability of conspicuous palm fruits, i.e....

Data from: Temporal scale-dependence of plant-pollinator networks

Benjamin Schwarz, Diego Vázquez, Paul CaraDonna, Tiffany Knight, Gita Benadi, Carsten Dormann, Benoit Gauzens, Elena Motivans, Julian Resasco, Nico Blüthgen, Laura Burkle, Qiang Fang, Christopher Kaiser-Bunbury, Ruben Alarcón, Justin Bain, Natacha Chacoff, Shuang-Quan Huang, Gretchen LeBuhn, Molly MacLeod, Theodora Petanidou, Claus Rasmussen, Michael Simanonok, Amibeth Thompson, Daniel Cariveau, Michael Roswell … & Jochen Fründ
The study of mutualistic interaction networks has led to valuable insights into ecological and evolutionary processes. However, our understanding of network structure may depend upon the temporal scale at which we sample and analyze network data. To date, we lack a comprehensive assessment of the temporal scale-dependence of network structure across a wide range of temporal scales and geographic locations. If network structure is temporally scale-dependent, networks constructed over different temporal scales may provide very...

Grasslands of temperate Europe in a changing world – Editorial to the 16th EDGG Special Feature in Tuexenia

Steffen Boch, Thomas Becker, Balázs Deák, Jürgen Dengler & Valentin H. Klaus
Mitglieder der Eurasian Dry Grassland Group (EDGG) und deren Vorgängerorganisationen geben seit 16 Jahren Grasland-Sonderausgaben (Special Features) in Tuexenia heraus. Das diesjährige Special Feature mit dem Titel Grasländer des gemäßigten Europas in einer sich verändernden Welt umfasst sieben Artikel, die verschiedene Aspekte der Graslandforschung beleuchten und dabei unterschiedliche Organismengruppen einbeziehen: LLUMIQUINGA et al. untersuchten Langzeiteffekte von Einsaat, Mahd und Kohlenstoffzusatz (Reduktion der Nährstoffverfügbarkeit durch Verschiebung des C/N-Verhältnis) auf den Renaturierungserfolg von pannonischem Sandgrasland auf ehemaligen...

Floristic changes of xerothermic grasslands in Central Germany: A resurvey study based on quasi-permanent plots

Tim Meier, Isabell Hensen & Monika Partzsch
Biodiversity has declined in the dry and semi-dry grasslands of Central Germany over the past three decades, mainly as a result of ‘Global Change’, including changes to traditional land use prac-tices. Such processes have promoted the spread of grass species such as Bromus erectus, which has become increasingly dominant within xerothermic grasslands. The aim of the study was to investi-gate changes in the vegetation of such grasslands over the last two decades by comparing previous...

Semi-open landscapes of former military training areas are key habitats for threatened birds

Heike Culmsee, Boris Evers, Tobias Leikauf & Karsten Wesche
Military training areas (MTAs) show high numbers of rare and threatened species and diverse habitat patterns due to low nitrogen input and heterogeneous disturbance dynamics caused by mili-tary training activities that produce fine-scale landscape mosaics. Since the 1990s, major parts of MTAs in Europe have been decommissioned. In Germany, most of them were transferred to the national natural heritage now facing the challenge of developing comprehensive conservation man-agement strategies. In order to elucidate their current...

Vegetation changes in urban grasslands over 25 years in the city of Zurich, Switzerland

Julia Kummli, Stefan Widmer, Markus Wilhelm, Jürgen Dengler & Regula Billeter
Many studies have demonstrated significant alterations in the species composition of grasslands in Central Europe over the past decades due to multiple drivers of anthropogenic environmental change. Most such studies deal with dry, acidic, wet or alpine grassland types, while little is known about changes in mesic grasslands, particularly in urban areas. To investigate the effects of anthropogenic environmental change on such grasslands, we resurveyed a selection of plots in the city of Zurich (Switzerland)...

Data from: Autofertility and self-compatibility moderately benefit island colonization of plants

Mialy Razanajatovo, Mark Van Kleunen, Holger Kreft, Wayne Dawson, Franz Essl, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, Marten Winter & Patrick Weigelt
Aim: The current geographical distribution of species largely reflects colonization success after natural long‐distance dispersal or introduction by humans. Plants with selfing ability should have an advantage when establishing on islands where mates and pollinators are limited (Baker's law). However, high percentages of dioecious and self‐incompatible species have been reported for some islands, possibly resulting from post‐colonization evolution. Given that such evolution is less likely to apply to alien species recently introduced to islands by...

Data from: Root and shoot glucosinolate allocation patterns follow optimal defence allocation theory

Tomonori Tsunoda, Sebastian Krosse, Nicole Van Dam & Nicole M. Van Dam
1. Optimal defence allocation theory (ODT) is one of the most prominent theoretical frameworks to explain the allocation of defence compounds within plants. It predicts that the most valuable and vulnerable plant organs have the highest levels of chemical defence. The ODT has been well worked out and experimentally tested for shoot defences, but not for root defences. To assess if ODT principles apply similarly to roots and shoots, we examined glucosinolates in aboveground and...

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