153 Works

Data from: Temporal scale-dependence of plant-pollinator networks

Benjamin Schwarz, Diego Vázquez, Paul CaraDonna, Tiffany Knight, Gita Benadi, Carsten Dormann, Benoit Gauzens, Elena Motivans, Julian Resasco, Nico Blüthgen, Laura Burkle, Qiang Fang, Christopher Kaiser-Bunbury, Ruben Alarcón, Justin Bain, Natacha Chacoff, Shuang-Quan Huang, Gretchen LeBuhn, Molly MacLeod, Theodora Petanidou, Claus Rasmussen, Michael Simanonok, Amibeth Thompson, Daniel Cariveau, Michael Roswell … & Jochen Fründ
The study of mutualistic interaction networks has led to valuable insights into ecological and evolutionary processes. However, our understanding of network structure may depend upon the temporal scale at which we sample and analyze network data. To date, we lack a comprehensive assessment of the temporal scale-dependence of network structure across a wide range of temporal scales and geographic locations. If network structure is temporally scale-dependent, networks constructed over different temporal scales may provide very...

Data from: Cascading effects of climate variability on the breeding success of an edge population of an apex predator

Laura Gangoso, Duarte Viana, Adriaan Dokter, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Jordi Figuerola, Sergio Barbosa & Willem Bouten
1. Large-scale environmental forces can influence biodiversity at different levels of biological organization. Climate, in particular, is often associated to species distributions and diversity gradients. However, its mechanistic link to population dynamics is still poorly understood. 2. Here, we unraveled the full mechanistic path by which a climatic driver, the Atlantic trade winds, determines the viability of a bird population. 3. We monitored the breeding population of Eleonora’s falcons in the Canary Islands for over...

Agriculture causes homogenization of plant-feeding nematode communities at the regional scale

Antonio Archidona-Yuste, Thorsten Wiegand, Nico Eisenhauer, Carolina Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, Juan E. Palomares-Rius & Pablo Castillo
1. An emerging research line in conservation ecology addresses how environmental change drivers may cause the biotic homogenization of ecological communities by shifts in species diversity and community composition. While the drivers have been explored in unmanaged ecosystems and managed agricultural systems, this issue has received limited attention in regards to a key soil bioindicator organisms, soil nematodes. 2. In this study, we evaluated the effect of land-use change and intensification on the diversity of...

Traditional land use, management and biodiversity of European semi-natural grasslands – Editorial to the 15th EDGG Special Feature

Steffen Boch, Thomas Becker, Balázs Deák, Jürgen Dengler & Viktoria Wagner
Seit 15 Jahren geben Mitglieder der Eurasian Dry Grassland Group (EDGG) und deren Vorgänger-organisationen Grasland-Sonderausgaben (Special Features) in Tuexeniaheraus. Das diesjährige Special Feature mit dem Titel Traditionelle Landnutzung, Management und Biodiversität von halb-natürlichem Grasland in Europa umfasst acht Artikel, die viele Aspekte der Graslandforschung beleuchten und verschiedene Organismengruppen miteinbeziehen: JANIŠOVÁ et al. (2020a) untersuch-ten den Einfluss verschiedener traditioneller Landnutzungsformen auf den Artenreichtum des extensi-ven Graslands im Apuseni-Gebirge in Westrumänien. LABADESSA et al.(2020) verglichen die Arten-zusammensetzung...

Determination of habitat requirements of the glacial relict Nuphar pumila as basis for successful (re-)introductions

Sabrina Keller, Manuel Babbi, Stefan Widmer, Jamyra Gehler, Sonja Hausmann, Christian Berg, Flavia Landucci, Patrick Schwager, Kateřina Šumberová & Jürgen Dengler
Nuphar pumilais a glacial relict, which is nowadays rare throughout Europe and red-listed in most European regions. In Switzerland only three autochthonous populations and one population of the hybrid with N. lutea (N. ×spenneriana) have survived to date, one of them in the canton of Zurich. To protect this species regionally, the canton of Zurich has commissioned the ex situ propagation of speci-mens, which then had been introduced to 37 water bodies in protected areas,...

Canopy structure change throughout a growing season in Trait-Based Experiment in 2014

Claudia Guimarães-Steinicke & Christian Wirth

Data from: Vanishing refuge? Testing the forest refuge hypothesis in coastal East Africa using genome-wide sequence data for seven amphibians

Christopher D. Barratt, Beryl A. Bwong, Robert Jehle, H. Christoph Liedtke, Peter Nagel, Renske E. Onstein, Daniel M. Portik, Jeffrey W. Streicher & Simon P. Loader
High-throughput sequencing data have greatly improved our ability to understand the processes that contribute to current biodiversity patterns. The “vanishing refuge” diversification model is speculated for the coastal forests of eastern Africa, whereby some taxa have persisted and diversified between forest refugia, while others have switched to becoming generalists also present in non-forest habitats. Complex arrangements of geographical barriers (hydrology and topography) and ecological gradients between forest and non-forest habitats may have further influenced the...

Data from: Root biomass and exudates link plant diversity with soil bacterial and fungal biomass

Nico Eisenhauer, Arnaud Lanoue, Tanja Strecker, Stefan Scheu, Katja Steinauer, Madhav P. Thakur & Liesje Mommer
Plant diversity has been shown to determine the composition and functioning of soil biota. Although root-derived organic inputs are discussed as the main drivers of soil communities, experimental evidence is scarce. While there is some evidence that higher root biomass at high plant diversity increases substrate availability for soil biota, several studies have speculated that the quantity and diversity of root inputs into the soil, i.e. though root exudates, drive plant diversity effects on soil...

Data from: Life in leaf litter: novel insights into community dynamics of bacteria and fungi during litter decomposition

Witoon Purahong, Tesfaye Wubet, Guillaume Lentendu, Michael Schloter, Marek J. Pecyna, Danuta Kapturska, Martin Hofrichter, Dirk Krüger & François Buscot
Microorganisms play a crucial role in the biological decomposition of plant litter in terrestrial ecosystems. Due to the permanently changing litter quality during decomposition, studies of both fungi and bacteria at a fine taxonomic resolution are required during the whole process. Here we investigated microbial community succession in decomposing leaf litter of temperate beech forest using pyrotag sequencing of the bacterial 16S and the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rRNA genes. Our results reveal that...

Data from: Plant species richness negatively affects root decomposition in grasslands

Hongmei Chen, Liesje Mommer, Jasper Van Ruijven, Hans De Kroon, Christine Fischer, Arthur Gessler, Anke Hildebrandt, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen, Christian Wirth & Alexandra Weigelt
Plant diversity enhances many ecosystem functions, including root biomass production, which drives soil carbon input. Although root decomposition accounts for a large proportion of carbon input for soil, little is known about plant diversity effect on this process. Plant diversity may affect root decomposition in two non-exclusive ways: by providing roots of different substrate quality (e.g. root chemistry) and/or by altering the soil environment (e.g. microclimate). To disentangle these two pathways, we conducted three decomposition...

Data from: Tree mortality across biomes is promoted by drought intensity, lower wood density and higher specific leaf area

Sarah Greenwood, Paloma Ruiz-Benito, Jordi Martínez-Vilalta, Francisco Lloret, Thomas Kitzberger, Craig D. Allen, Rod Fensham, Daniel C. Laughlin, Jens Kattge, Gerhard Bonisch, Nathan J. B. Kraft & Alistair S. Jump
Drought events are increasing globally, and reports of consequent forest mortality are widespread. However, due to a lack of a quantitative global synthesis, it is still not clear whether drought-induced mortality rates differ among global biomes and whether functional traits influence the risk of drought-induced mortality. To address these uncertainties, we performed a global meta-analysis of 58 studies of drought-induced forest mortality. Mortality rates were modelled as a function of drought, temperature, biomes, phylogenetic and...

Data from: Locally and systemically induced glucosinolates follow optimal defence allocation theory upon root herbivory

Tomonori Tsunoda, Katharina Grosser & Nicole M. Van Dam
1. Herbivore-induced defences in plants are considered a strategy to manage multiple interactions while saving resources. The optimal defence theory (ODT) is one of the most prominent theoretical frameworks to explain the defence allocation patterns within plants. It was recently shown that the ODT generally applies to constitutive glucosinolate (GSL) allocation in shoot and root organs. Previous studies showed that both root and shoot herbivore feeding may alter defence allocation over plant organs. For shoots,...

Data from: Fungal disease incidence along tree diversity gradients depends on latitude in European forests

Diem Nguyen, Bastien Castagneyrol, Helge Bruelheide, Filippo Bussotti, Virginie Guyot, Hervé Jactel, Bogdan Jaroszewicz, Fernando Valladares, Jan Stenlid & Johanna Boberg
European forests host a diversity of tree species that are increasingly threatened by fungal pathogens, which may have cascading consequences for forest ecosystems and their functioning. Previous experimental studies suggest that foliar and root pathogen abundance and disease severity decrease with increasing tree species diversity, but evidences from natural forests are rare. Here, we tested whether foliar fungal disease incidence was negatively affected by tree species diversity in different forest types across Europe. We measured...

Associated evolution of fruit size, fruit color and spines in Neotropical palms

Lucas Ferreira Do Nascimento, , Renske E. Onstein, W. Daniel Kissling & Mathias M. Pires
Understanding how ecological interactions have shaped the evolutionary dynamics of species traits remains a challenge in evolutionary ecology. Combining trait evolution models and phylogenies, we analyzed the evolution of characters associated with seed dispersal (fruit size and color) and herbivory (spines) in Neotropical palms to infer the role of these opposing animal-plant interactions in driving evolutionary patterns. We found that the evolution of fruit color and fruit size were associated in Neotropical palms, supporting the...

Data from: A closer examination of the 'abundant center' hypothesis for reef fishes

Itai Granot, Hagar Yancovitch Shalom, Shane Blowes, Alan Friedlander, Camille Mellin, Carlos Ferreira, Arias-González Ernesto, Michel Kulbicki, Sergio Floeter, Pascal Chabanet, Valeriano Parravicini & Jonathan Belmaker
Aim: The ‘abundant center’ hypothesis states that species are more abundant at the center of their range. However, several recent large-scale studies have failed to find evidence for such a pattern. Here we use extensive global data of reef fishes to test the strength of the 'abundant center' pattern, and to examine variation in the patterns across species using life history and ecological traits. Location: Marine habitat at a global extent: from Indo-Pacific to Atlantic...

Data from: ‘In and out of’ the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and the Himalayas: centers of origin and diversification compared across five clades of Eurasian montane and alpine passerine birds

Martin Päckert, Adrien Favre, Jan Schnitzler, Jochen Martens, Yue-Hua Sun, Dieter Thomas Tietze, Frank Hailer, Ingo Michalak & Patrick Strutzenberger
Encompassing some of the major hotspots of biodiversity on Earth, large mountain systems have long held the attention of evolutionary biologists. The region of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) is considered a biogeographic source for multiple colonization events into adjacent areas including the northern Palearctic. The faunal exchange between the QTP and adjacent regions could thus represent a one-way street (‘out of’ the QTP). However, immigration into the QTP region has so far received only little...

Source pools and disharmony of the world’s island floras

Christian König, Patrick Weigelt, Amanda Taylor, Anke Stein, Wayne Dawson, Franz Essl, Jan Pergl, Petr Pysek, Mark Van Kleunen, Marten Winter, Cyrille Chatelain, Jan Wieringa, Pavel Krestov & Holger Kreft
Island disharmony refers to the biased representation of higher taxa on islands compared to their mainland source regions and represents a central concept in island biology. Here, we develop a generalizable framework for approximating these source regions and conduct the first global assessment of island disharmony and its underlying drivers. We compiled vascular plant species lists for 178 oceanic islands and 735 mainland regions. Using mainland data only, we modelled species turnover as a function...

Fitness and fur colouration - testing the camouflage and thermoregulation hypotheses in an Arctic mammal

Cecilia Di Bernardi, Anne-Mathilde Thierry, Nina E. Eide, Diana E. Bowler, Lars Rød-Eriksen, Stefan Blumentrath, Lukas Tietgen, Brett Sandercock, Øystein Flagstad & Arild Landa
1. Selection for crypsis has been recognised as an important ecological driver of animal coloration, whereas the relative importance of thermoregulation is more contentious with mixed empirical support. A potential thermal advantage of darker individuals has been observed in a wide range of animal species. Arctic animals that exhibit colour polymorphisms and undergo seasonal colour moults are interesting study subjects for testing the two alternative hypotheses: demographic performance of different colour morphs might be differentially...

Plant cover and plant-pollinator interactions in Central European grasslands (Poland/Czech Republic)

Demetra Rakosy, Elena Motivans, Valentin Ştefan, Arkadiusz Nowak, Sebastian Świerszcz, Reinart Feldmann, Elisabeth Kühn, Costanza Geppert, Neeraja Venkataraman, Anna Sobieraj-Betlińska, Anita Grossmann, Wiktoria Rojek, Katarzyna Pochrząst, Magdalena Cielniak, Anika Kirstin Gathof, Kevin Baumann & Tiffany Marie Knight
Complex socio-economic, political and demographic factors have driven the increased conversion of Europe’s semi-natural grasslands to intensive pastures. This trend is particularly strong in some of the most biodiverse regions of the continent, such as Central and Eastern Europe. Intensive grazing is known to decrease species diversity and alter the composition of plant and insect communities. Comparatively little is known, however, about how intensive grazing influences plant functional traits related to pollination and the structure...

Biotic filtering by species’ interactions constrains food-web variability across spatial and abiotic gradients

Barbara Bauer, Emilio Berti, Remo Ryser, Benoit Gauzens, Myriam Hirt, Benjamin Rosenbaum, Christoph Digel, David Ott, Stefan Scheu & Ulrich Brose
Despite intensive research on species dissimilarity patterns across communities (i.e. beta-diversity), we still know little about their implications for variation in food-web structures. Our analyses of 50 lake and 48 forest soil communities show that, while species dissimilarity depends on environmental and spatial gradients, these effects are only weakly propagated to the networks. Moreover, our results show that species and food-web dissimilarities are consistently correlated, but that much of the variation in food-web structure across...

Marginal imprint of human land use upon fire history in a mire-dominated boreal landscape of the Veps Highland, North-West Russia

Igor Drobyshev, Nina Ryzhkova, Mats Niklasson, Alexei Zhukov, Irma Mullonen, Guilherme Pinto & Alexander Kryshen'
Spatially explicit reconstructions of fire activity in European boreal forests are rare, limiting our understanding of factors driving vegetation dynamics in this part of the boreal domain. We have developed a spatially explicit dendrochronological reconstruction of a fire regime in a mire-dominated landscape of the Veps Nature Park (North-West Russia) over the 1580-2000 CE period. We dated 74 fire years using 164 fire-scarred living and dead Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees collected on 31...

Pacific Introduced Flora (PacIFLora)

Michael Wohlwend, Dylan Craven, Patrick Weigelt, Hanno Seebens, Marten Winter, Holger Kreft, Wayne Dawson, Franz Essl, Mark Van Kleunen, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, James Space, Philip Thomas & Tiffany Knight
The Pacific region has the highest density of naturalized plant species worldwide, which makes it an important area for research on the ecology, evolution and biogeography of biological invasions. While different data sources on naturalized plant species exist for the Pacific, there is no taxonomically and spatially harmonized database available for different subsets of species and islands. A comprehensive, accessible database containing the distribution of naturalized vascular plant species in the Pacific will enable new...

Data from: Multi-trophic guilds respond differently to changing elevation in a subtropical forest

Julia Binkenstein, Alexandra-Maria Klein, Thorsten Assmann, Francois Buscot, Alexandra Erfmeier, Keping Ma, Katherina A. Pietsch, Karsten Schmidt, Thomas Scholten, Tesfaye Wubet, Helge Bruelheide, Andreas Schuldt & Michael Staab
Negative relationships between species richness and elevation are common and attributed to changes in single environmental properties associated to elevation, such as temperature and habitat area. However, research has lacked taxonomic breadth and comprehensive elevation studies that consider multiple groups from different trophic levels are rare. We thus analysed 24 groups of plants, arthropods, and microorganisms grouped into six trophic guilds (predators, detritivores, herbivores, plants, bacteria and fungi) along a relatively short elevational gradient (~600...

Data from: Warming magnifies predation and reduces prey coexistence in a model litter arthropod system

Madhav P. Thakur, Tom Kunne, John N. Griffin & Nico Eisenhauer
Climate warming can destabilize interactions between competitors as smaller organisms gain advantages in warmer environments. Whether and how warming-induced effects on competitive interactions are modified by predation remains unknown. We hypothesized that predation will offset the competitive advantage of smaller prey species in warmer environments because of their greater vulnerability to predation. To test this, we assembled a litter arthropod community with two Collembola species (Folsomia candida and Proisotoma minuta) of different body sizes across...

Data from: Cascading effects of belowground predators on plant communities are density-dependent

Madhav Prakash Thakur, Martina Herrmann, Katja Steinauer, Saskia Rennoch, Simone Cesarz & Nico Eisenhauer
Soil food webs comprise a multitude of trophic interactions that can affect the composition and productivity of plant communities. Belowground predators feeding on microbial grazers like Collembola could decelerate nutrient mineralization by reducing microbial turnover in the soil, which in turn could negatively influence plant growth. However, empirical evidences for the ecological significance of belowground predators on nutrient cycling and plant communities are scarce. Here, we manipulated predator density (Hypoaspis aculeifer: predatory mite) with equal...

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