16 Works

Data from: Stronger effect of gastropods than rodents on seedling establishment, irrespective of exotic or native plant species origin

Lotte Korell, Claudia Stein, Isabell Hensen, Helge Bruelheide, Katharine N. Suding & Harald Auge
Experimental evidence about how generalist consumers affect exotic plant invasions is equivocal, but most tests have been limited to few plant species, single herbivore guilds, and single locations. Using a seed-addition experiment, we studied effects of gastropods and rodents on recruitment success of 37 exotic and 37 native plant species affiliated to three different functional groups (i.e. grasses, legumes and non-legume herbs). We replicated our seed addition x herbivore exclusion experiment at multiple grassland sites,...

Data from: The influence of balanced and imbalanced resource supply on biodiversity-functioning relationship across ecosystems

Aleksandra M. Lewandowska, Antje Biermann, Elizabeth T. Borer, Miguel A. Cebrian-Piqueras, Steven A. J. Declerck, Luc De Meester, Ellen Van Donk, Lars Gamfeldt, Daniel S. Gruner, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Kevin P. Kirkman, Christopher A. Klausmeier, Michael Kleyer, Johannes M. H. Knops, Pieter Lemmens, Eric M. Lind, Elena Litchman, Jasmin Mantilla-Contreras, Koen Martens, Sandra Meier, Vanessa Minden, Joslin L. Moore, Harry Olde Venterink, Eric W. Seabloom … & Helmut Hillebrand
Numerous studies show that increasing species richness leads to higher ecosystem productivity. This effect is often attributed to more efficient portioning of multiple resources in communities with higher numbers of competing species, indicating the role of resource supply and stoichiometry for biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships. Here, we merged theory on ecological stoichiometry with a framework of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning to understand how resource use transfers into primary production. We applied a structural equation model to define patterns...

Data from: Adaptive and non-adaptive evolution of trait means and genetic trait correlations for herbivory resistance and performance in an invasive plant

Karin Schrieber, Sabrina Wolf, Catherina Wypior, Diana Höhlig, Isabell Hensen & Susanne Lachmuth
The EICA-hypothesis predicts that invading plants adapt to their novel environment by evolving increased performance and reduced resistance in response to the release from natural enemies, and assumes a resource allocation tradeoff among both trait groups as mechanistic basis of this evolutionary change. Using the plant Silene latifolia as a study system, we tested these predictions by investigating whether 1) invasive populations evolved lower resistance and higher performance, 2) this evolutionary change is indeed adaptive,...

Data from: Patterns and correlates of claims for brown bear damage on a continental scale

Carlos Bautista, Javier Naves, Eloy Revilla, Néstor Fernández, Jörg Albrecht, Anne K. Scharf, Robin Rigg, Alexandros A. Karamanlidis, Klemen Jerina, Djuro Huber, Santiago Palazón, Raido Kont, Paolo Ciucci, Claudio Groff, Aleksandar Dutsov, Juan Seijas, Pierre-Ives Quenette, Agnieszka Olszańska, Maryna Shkvyria, Michal Adamec, Janis Ozolins, Marko Jonozovič & Nuria Selva
Wildlife damage to human property threatens human–wildlife coexistence. Conflicts arising from wildlife damage in intensively managed landscapes often undermine conservation efforts, making damage mitigation and compensation of special concern for wildlife conservation. However, the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of damage and claims at large scales are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the patterns of damage caused by brown bears Ursus arctos and its ecological and socio-economic correlates at a continental scale. We compiled information...

Data from: Elevated virulence of an emerging viral genotype as a driver of honeybee loss

Dino P. McMahon, Myrsini E. Natsopoulou, Vincent Doublet, Matthias Fürst, Silvio Weging, Mark J. F. Brown, Andreas Gogol-Döring & Robert J. Paxton
Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) have contributed significantly to the current biodiversity crisis, leading to widespread epidemics and population loss. Owing to genetic variation in pathogen virulence, a complete understanding of species decline requires the accurate identification and characterization of EIDs. We explore this issue in the Western honeybee, where increasing mortality of populations in the Northern Hemisphere has caused major concern. Specifically, we investigate the importance of genetic identity of the main suspect in mortality,...

Data from: Fungal disease incidence along tree diversity gradients depends on latitude in European forests

Diem Nguyen, Bastien Castagneyrol, Helge Bruelheide, Filippo Bussotti, Virginie Guyot, Hervé Jactel, Bogdan Jaroszewicz, Fernando Valladares, Jan Stenlid & Johanna Boberg
European forests host a diversity of tree species that are increasingly threatened by fungal pathogens, which may have cascading consequences for forest ecosystems and their functioning. Previous experimental studies suggest that foliar and root pathogen abundance and disease severity decrease with increasing tree species diversity, but evidences from natural forests are rare. Here, we tested whether foliar fungal disease incidence was negatively affected by tree species diversity in different forest types across Europe. We measured...

Data from: Plant species richness negatively affects root decomposition in grasslands

Hongmei Chen, Liesje Mommer, Jasper Van Ruijven, Hans De Kroon, Christine Fischer, Arthur Gessler, Anke Hildebrandt, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen, Christian Wirth & Alexandra Weigelt
Plant diversity enhances many ecosystem functions, including root biomass production, which drives soil carbon input. Although root decomposition accounts for a large proportion of carbon input for soil, little is known about plant diversity effect on this process. Plant diversity may affect root decomposition in two non-exclusive ways: by providing roots of different substrate quality (e.g. root chemistry) and/or by altering the soil environment (e.g. microclimate). To disentangle these two pathways, we conducted three decomposition...

Data from: Life in leaf litter: novel insights into community dynamics of bacteria and fungi during litter decomposition

Witoon Purahong, Tesfaye Wubet, Guillaume Lentendu, Michael Schloter, Marek J. Pecyna, Danuta Kapturska, Martin Hofrichter, Dirk Krüger & François Buscot
Microorganisms play a crucial role in the biological decomposition of plant litter in terrestrial ecosystems. Due to the permanently changing litter quality during decomposition, studies of both fungi and bacteria at a fine taxonomic resolution are required during the whole process. Here we investigated microbial community succession in decomposing leaf litter of temperate beech forest using pyrotag sequencing of the bacterial 16S and the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rRNA genes. Our results reveal that...

Data from: Root-lesion nematodes suppress cabbage aphid population development by reducing aphid daily reproduction

Wilhelmina H. G. Hol, Ciska E. Raaijmakers, Ilse Mons, Katrin M. Meyer & Nicole M. Van Dam
Empirical studies have shown that belowground feeding herbivores can affect the performance of aboveground herbivores in different ways. Often the critical life-history parameters underlying the observed performance effects remain unexplored. In order to better understand the cause for the observed effects on aboveground herbivores, these ecological mechanisms must be better understood. In this study we combined empirical experiments with a modelling approach to analyse the effect of two root feeding endoparasitic nematodes with different feeding...

Data from: Genetic differentiation and regional adaptation among seed origins used for grassland restoration: lessons from a multispecies transplant experiment

Anna Bucharova, Stefan Michalski, Julia-Maria Hermann, Karola Heveling, Norbert Hölzel, Johannes Kollmann, Walter Durka & Oliver Bossdorf
One of the key questions in ecosystem restoration is the choice of seed material for restoring plant communities. More and more scientists and practitioners are currently advocating the use of regional seed sources, based on the argument that plants are often adapted to local or regional environmental conditions, and thus, regional seed sources should provide the best restoration success. However, there is still substantial debate about this approach, partly because of a lack of solid...

Data from: The simultaneous inducibility of phytochemicals related to plant direct and indirect defences against herbivores is stronger at low elevation

Loïc Pellissier, Xoaquín Moreira, Holger Danner, Martha Serrano, Nicolas Salamin, Nicole M. Van Dam & Sergio Rasmann
Ecological theory indicates that warmer and more stable climates should result in stronger biotic interactions. Therefore, plant species growing at lower elevations and experiencing greater herbivore pressure, should invest in higher levels of defences than those at higher elevations. Nonetheless, there are a number of studies that have found no effect of elevational gradients on plant defensive traits. Several factors might explain the lack of consistency for the altitude-defence relationships; including 1) the reduction of...

Data from: Invasion success in polyploids: the role of inbreeding in the contrasting colonization abilities of diploid versus tetraploid populations of Centaurea stoebe s.l

Christoph Rosche, Isabell Hensen, Patrik Mráz, Walter Durka, Matthias Hartmann & Susanne Lachmuth
As a consequence of founder effects, inbreeding can hamper colonization success: First, in species with self-incompatibility controlled by an S-locus, inbreeding may decrease cross-compatibility, mainly due to the sharing of identical S-alleles between closely related mating partners. Secondly, inbreeding can reduce fitness of inbred relative to outbred offspring (i.e. inbreeding depression). Polyploids often show reduced inbreeding depression compared to diploids, which may contribute to the overrepresentation of polyploids among invasive species. This is the first...

Data from: Does movement behaviour predict population densities? a test with 25 butterfly species

Cheryl B. Schultz, B. Guy Pe'er, Christine Damiani, Leone Brown & Elizabeth E. Crone
Diffusion, which approximates a correlated random walk, has been used by ecologists to describe movement, and forms the basis for many theoretical models. However, it is often criticized as too simple a model to describe animal movement in real populations. We test a key prediction of diffusion models, namely, that animals should be more abundant in land cover classes through which they move more slowly. This relationship between density and diffusion has rarely been tested...

Data from: Herbivory mediates the long-term shifts in the relative importance of microsite and propagule limitation

Anu Eskelinen, Patrick Saccone, Marko J. Spasojevic & Risto Virtanen
Microsite and propagule limitation are predicted to jointly influence plant community assembly and diversity, with shifts in their relative contributions under different ecological conditions. Mammalian herbivory can also exhibit strong impact on community assembly and diversity. However, to date few studies have considered how herbivory might interact with propagule and microsite limitation and how herbivory might alter their relative importance. Even fewer studies have examined how these processes manifest over time to influence community assembly....

Data from: Comparing the responses of bryophytes and short-statured vascular plants to climate shifts and eutrophication

Risto Virtanen, Anu Eskelinen & Susan Harrison
Few experimental studies have tested how abundance and diversity of grassland bryophytes respond to global environmental changes such as climate shifts and eutrophication. Because bryophytes in grasslands are low-statured, and because plant height is a key functional trait governing plant responses to resource gradients, their responses to these factors could resemble those of better-studied small vascular plants. Alternatively, traits unique to bryophytes could lead to qualitatively different responses than those of small vascular plants. In...

Data from: Taxonomic and functional diversity in Mediterranean pastures: Insights on the biodiversity-productivity trade-off

Victor Rolo, David Rivest, Miren Lorente, Jens Kattge & Gerardo Moreno
Agricultural intensification is one of the main causes of biodiversity loss world-wide. The inclusion of semi-natural features in agricultural landscapes is suggested as a means of enhancing farm biodiversity, but this practice may have potential negative effects on yield production. Moreover, little evidence exists for effects of semi-natural features on other components of biodiversity, such as functional diversity. Yet this could provide a more comprehensive understanding of biodiversity–productivity trade-offs. Here, we report the effects of...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    16

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    16

Affiliations

  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    16
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    6
  • Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg
    5
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    2
  • University of Oulu
    2
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • Institute of Biology
    1
  • Vrije Universiteit Brussel
    1