26 Works

Data from: Role of multiple invasion mechanisms and their interaction in regulating the population dynamics of an exotic tree

Raelene M. Crandall & Tiffany M. Knight
Understanding the mechanisms that allow exotic species to have rapid population growth is an important step in the process of controlling existing invasions and preventing future invasions. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain why some exotic species become invasive, the most prominent of which focus on the roles of habitat disturbance, competitors and consumers. The magnitude and direction of each of these mechanisms on population dynamics observed in previous studies is quite variable. It...

Data from: Distance-dependent seedling mortality and long-term spacing dynamics in a neotropical forest community

Stephen J. Murphy, Thorsten Wiegand & Liza S. Comita
Negative distance dependence (NDisD), or reduced recruitment near adult conspecifics, is thought to explain the astounding diversity of tropical forests. While many studies show greater mortality at near vs. far distances from adults, these studies do not seek to track changes in the peak seedling curve over time, thus limiting our ability to link NDisD to coexistence. Using census data collected over 12 years from central Panama in conjunction with spatial mark-connection functions, we show...

Data from: Soil drainage facilitates earthworm invasion and subsequent carbon loss from peatland soil

Xinwei Wu, Rui Cao, Xue Wei, Xinqiang Xi, Peili Shi, Nico Eisenhauer & Shucun Sun
1. Human activities have been a significant driver of environmental changes with tremendous consequences for carbon dynamics. Peatlands are critical ecosystems because they store ~30% of the global soil organic carbon pool and are particularly vulnerable to anthropogenic changes. The Zoige peatland on the eastern Tibet Plateau, as the largest alpine peatland in the world, accounts for 1‰ of global peat soil organic carbon storage. However, this peatland has experienced dramatic climate change including increased...

Data from: Root and shoot glucosinolate allocation patterns follow optimal defence allocation theory

Tomonori Tsunoda, Sebastian Krosse, Nicole Van Dam & Nicole M. Van Dam
1. Optimal defence allocation theory (ODT) is one of the most prominent theoretical frameworks to explain the allocation of defence compounds within plants. It predicts that the most valuable and vulnerable plant organs have the highest levels of chemical defence. The ODT has been well worked out and experimentally tested for shoot defences, but not for root defences. To assess if ODT principles apply similarly to roots and shoots, we examined glucosinolates in aboveground and...

Data from: Temperature and consumer type dependencies of energy flows in natural communities

Birgit Lang, Roswitha B. Ehnes, Ulrich Brose & Björn C. Rall
With the world continuously warming, a mechanistic understanding of how temperature affects interaction strengths, which are fundamental to food-web stability, is needed. As interaction strengths are determined by the flows of energy from resources to consumers, we investigated effects of temperature on animal energetics. We used newly compiled datasets on respiration rates and assimilation efficiencies to assess how temperature affects the energy use (respiration rates) and the efficiency of energy gain (assimilation efficiency) for different...

Data from: Testing the validity of functional response models using molecular gut content analysis for prey choice in soil predators

Bernhard Eitzinger, Björn Rall, Michael Traugott & Stefan Scheu
Analysis of predator - prey interactions is a core concept of animal ecology, explaining structure and dynamics of animal food webs. Measuring the functional response, i.e. the intake rate of a consumer as a function of prey density, is a powerful method to predict the strength of trophic links and assess motives of prey choice, particularly in arthropod communities. However, due to their reductionist set-up, functional responses, which are based on laboratory feeding experiments, may...

Data from: Root biomass and exudates link plant diversity with soil bacterial and fungal biomass

Nico Eisenhauer, Arnaud Lanoue, Tanja Strecker, Stefan Scheu, Katja Steinauer, Madhav P. Thakur & Liesje Mommer
Plant diversity has been shown to determine the composition and functioning of soil biota. Although root-derived organic inputs are discussed as the main drivers of soil communities, experimental evidence is scarce. While there is some evidence that higher root biomass at high plant diversity increases substrate availability for soil biota, several studies have speculated that the quantity and diversity of root inputs into the soil, i.e. though root exudates, drive plant diversity effects on soil...

Data from: Tree mortality across biomes is promoted by drought intensity, lower wood density and higher specific leaf area

Sarah Greenwood, Paloma Ruiz-Benito, Jordi Martínez-Vilalta, Francisco Lloret, Thomas Kitzberger, Craig D. Allen, Rod Fensham, Daniel C. Laughlin, Jens Kattge, Gerhard Bonisch, Nathan J. B. Kraft & Alistair S. Jump
Drought events are increasing globally, and reports of consequent forest mortality are widespread. However, due to a lack of a quantitative global synthesis, it is still not clear whether drought-induced mortality rates differ among global biomes and whether functional traits influence the risk of drought-induced mortality. To address these uncertainties, we performed a global meta-analysis of 58 studies of drought-induced forest mortality. Mortality rates were modelled as a function of drought, temperature, biomes, phylogenetic and...

Data from: Distance sampling with camera traps

Eric J. Howe, Steven T. Buckland, Marie-Lyne Després-Einspenner, Hjalmar S. Kühl & Stephen T. Buckland
Reliable estimates of animal density and abundance are essential for effective wildlife conservation and management. Camera trapping has proven efficient for sampling multiple species, but statistical estimators of density from camera trapping data for species that cannot be individually identified are still in development. We extend point-transect methods for estimating animal density to accommodate data from camera traps, allowing researchers to exploit existing distance sampling theory and software for designing studies and analysing data. We...

Data from: Multi-trophic guilds respond differently to changing elevation in a subtropical forest

Julia Binkenstein, Alexandra-Maria Klein, Thorsten Assmann, Francois Buscot, Alexandra Erfmeier, Keping Ma, Katherina A. Pietsch, Karsten Schmidt, Thomas Scholten, Tesfaye Wubet, Helge Bruelheide, Andreas Schuldt & Michael Staab
Negative relationships between species richness and elevation are common and attributed to changes in single environmental properties associated to elevation, such as temperature and habitat area. However, research has lacked taxonomic breadth and comprehensive elevation studies that consider multiple groups from different trophic levels are rare. We thus analysed 24 groups of plants, arthropods, and microorganisms grouped into six trophic guilds (predators, detritivores, herbivores, plants, bacteria and fungi) along a relatively short elevational gradient (~600...

Data from: Modelling the area of occupancy of habitat types with remote sensing

Jose Manuel Álvarez-Martínez, Borja Jiménez-Alfaro, José Barquín, Bárbara Ondiviela, María Recio, Ana Silió-Calzada & Jose Antonio Juanes
1. A current challenge of biodiversity and conservation is the estimation of the spatial extent of habitat types across broad territories. In the absence of fine-resolution maps, predictive modelling helps in assessing the spatial distribution of vegetation cover. However, such approaches are still uncommon in regional planning and management. Here, we present a framework for mapping the area of occupancy (AOO) of habitat types that allows highly suitable estimates at different scales. 2. We model...

Data from: Warming magnifies predation and reduces prey coexistence in a model litter arthropod system

Madhav P. Thakur, Tom Kunne, John N. Griffin & Nico Eisenhauer
Climate warming can destabilize interactions between competitors as smaller organisms gain advantages in warmer environments. Whether and how warming-induced effects on competitive interactions are modified by predation remains unknown. We hypothesized that predation will offset the competitive advantage of smaller prey species in warmer environments because of their greater vulnerability to predation. To test this, we assembled a litter arthropod community with two Collembola species (Folsomia candida and Proisotoma minuta) of different body sizes across...

Data from: Species traits as drivers of food web structure

Idaline Laigle, Isabelle Aubin, Christoph Digel, Ulrich Brose, Isabelle Boulangeat & Dominique Gravel
The use of functional traits to describe community structure is a promising approach to reveal generalities across organisms and ecosystems. Plant ecologists have demonstrated the importance of traits in explaining community structure, competitive interactions as well as ecosystem functioning. The application of trait-based methods to more complex communities such as food webs is however more challenging owing to the diversity of animal characteristics and of interactions. The objective of this study was to determine how...

Data from: Experimental duration and predator satiation levels systematically affect functional response parameters

Yuanheng Li, Björn C. Rall & Gregor Kalinkat
Empirical feeding studies where density-dependent consumption rates are fitted to functional response models are often used to parameterize the interaction strengths in models of population or food-web dynamics. However, the relationship between functional response parameter estimates from short-term feeding studies and real-world, long-term, trophic interaction strengths remains largely unexamined. In a critical first step to address this void, we tested for systematic effects of experimental duration and predator satiation on the estimate of functional response...

Data from: A non-invasive method for sampling the body odour of mammals

Brigitte M. Weiß, Andrea Marcillo, Marta Manser, Ruben Holland, Claudia Birkemeyer & Anja Widdig
1. Olfaction is a central aspect of mammalian communication, providing information about individual attributes such as identity, sex, group membership or genetic quality. Yet, the chemical underpinnings of olfactory cues remain little understood, one of the reasons being the difficulty in obtaining high quality samples for chemical analysis. 2. In the present study we adjusted and evaluated the use of thermal desorption (TD) tubes, commonly used in plant metabolomic and environmental studies, for non-invasive sampling...

Data from: Manipulating two olfactory cues causes a biological control beetle to shift to non-target plant species

Na Li, Jia-Ning Wei, Meredith C. Schuman, Shuang Li, Rui-Yan Ma & Jin Ge
Olfactory cues can determine the host preferences of herbivorous insects, but their role in host shifting is unclear. Host specificity and the potential for host shifts are important criteria for screening and post-release evaluation of biological control agents for invasive plants. However, the role of olfactory cues in mediating host shifts in biological control agents is not well understood. To investigate the role of olfactory cues in host selection of a reportedly monophagous flea beetle...

Data from: Nitrogen deposition cancels out exotic earthworm effects on plant-feeding nematode communities

Yuanhu Shao, Weixin Zhang, Nico Eisenhauer, Tao Liu, Yanmei Xiong, Chenfei Liang & Shenglei Fu
The activity and spread of exotic earthworms often are spatially correlated with N deposition because both arise from human activities. Exotic earthworms, in turn, can also greatly affect soil abiotic and biotic properties, as well as related ecological processes. Previous studies showed, for example, that earthworms can counteract the detrimental effects of plant-feeding nematodes on plant growth. However, potential interactive effects of N deposition and exotic earthworms on ecosystems are poorly understood. We explored the...

Data from: Neighbourhood effects on plant reproduction: an experimental-analytical framework and its application to the invasive Senecio inaequidens

Susanne Lachmuth, Colette Henrichmann, Juliane Horn, Joern Pagel & Frank M. Schurr
1. Density-dependence is of fundamental importance for population and range dynamics. Density-dependent reproduction of plants arises from competitive and facilitative plant-plant interactions that can be pollination-independent or pollination-mediated. In small and sparse populations, conspecific density-dependence often turns from negative to positive and causes Allee effects. Reproduction may also increase with heterospecific density (community-level Allee effect), but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood and the consequences for community dynamics can be complex. Allee effects have crucial...

Data from: Invasive earthworms erode soil biodiversity: a meta-analysis

Olga Ferlian, Nico Eisenhauer, Martin Aguirrebengoa, Mariama Camara, Irene Ramirez-Rojas, Fabio Santos, Krizler Tanalgo & Madhav P. Thakur
1. Biological invasions pose a serious threat to biodiversity and ecosystem functioning across ecosystems. Invasions by ecosystem engineers, in particular, have been shown to have dramatic effects in recipient ecosystems. For instance, invasion by earthworms, a belowground invertebrate ecosystem engineer, in previously earthworm-free ecosystems dramatically alters the physico-chemical characteristics of the soil. Studies have shown that such alterations in the soil can have far-reaching impacts on soil organisms, which form a major portion of terrestrial...

Data from: Dietary changes in predators and scavengers in a nocturnally illuminated riparian ecosystem

Alessandro Manfrin, David Lehmann, Roy H.A. Van Grunsven, Stefano Larsen, Jari Syväranta, Geraldene Wharton, Christian C. Voigt, Michael T. Monaghan, Franz Hölker & Roy H. A. Van Grunsven
Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are linked by fluxes of carbon and nutrients in riparian areas. Processes that alter these fluxes may therefore change the diet and composition of consumer communities. We used stable carbon isotope (δ13C) analyses to test whether the increased abundance of aquatic prey observed in another study led to a dietary shift in riparian consumers in areas illuminated by artificial light at night (ALAN). We measured the contribution of aquatic-derived carbon to...

Data from: How do leaf trait values change spatially and temporally with light availability in a grassland diversity experiment?

Dörte Bachmann, Christiane Roscher & Nina Buchmann
Complementarity in light use might increase light exploitation and could be an important mechanism explaining the coexistence of multiple species in plant communities of increasing diversity. We measured vertical light profiles and leaf traits related to light acquisition and light use in 40 mixtures of varying species richness (SR, 2, 4, 8 and 16) and functional group richness (FR, 1-4) in a large grassland biodiversity experiment at five different times during the growing season. Light...

Data from: Belowground complementarity effects in a grassland biodiversity experiment are related to deep-rooting species

Natalie J. Oram, Janneke M. Ravenek, Kathryn E. Barry, Alexandra Weigelt, Hongmei Chen, Arthur Gessler, Annette Gockele, Hans De Kroon, Jan Willem Van Der Paauw, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen, Annemiek Smit-Tiekstra, Jasper Van Ruijven & Liesje Mommer
1. Belowground resource partitioning is often proposed as the underlying mechanism for the positive relationship between plant species richness and productivity. For example, if species have different root distributions, a mixture of plant species may be able to use the available resources more completely than the individual species in a monoculture. However, there is little experimental evidence for differentiation in vertical root distributions among species and its contribution to biodiversity effects. 2. We determined species-specific...

Data from: Resource stoichiometry and availability modulate species richness and biomass of tropical litter macro-invertebrates

Malte Jochum, Andrew D. Barnes, Patrick Weigelt, David Ott, Katja Rembold, Achmad Farajallah & Ulrich Brose
1. The high biodiversity and biomass of soil communities is crucial for litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems such as tropical forests. However, the leaf litter that these communities consume is of particularly poor quality as indicated by elemental stoichiometry. The impact of resource quantity, quality, and other habitat parameters on species richness and biomass of consumer communities is often studied in isolation, although much can be learned from simultaneously studying both community characteristics. 2. Using...

Data from: Land-use type and intensity differentially filter traits in above- and belowground arthropod communities

Klaus Birkhofer, Martin M. Gossner, Tim Diekötter, Claudia Drees, Olga Ferlian, Mark Maraun, Stefan Scheu, Wolfgang W. Weisser, Volkmar Wolters, Susanne Wurst, Andrey S. Zaitsev & Henrik G. Smith
1. Along with the global decline of species richness goes a loss of ecological traits. Associated biotic homogenization of animal communities and narrowing of trait diversity threaten ecosystem functioning and human well-being. High management intensity is regarded as an important ecological filter, eliminating species that lack suitable adaptations. Belowground arthropods are assumed to be less sensitive to such effects than aboveground arthropods. 2. Here, we compared the impact of management intensity between (grassland vs. forest)...

Data from: Less favorable climates constrain demographic strategies in plants

Anna M. Csergo, Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Olivier Broennimann, Shaun R. Coutts, Antoine Guisan, Amy L. Angert, Erik Welk, Iain Stott, Brian J. Enquist, Brian McGill, Jens-Christian Svenning, Cyrille Violle & Yvonne M. Buckley
Correlative species distribution models are based on the observed relationship between species’ occurrence and macroclimate or other environmental variables. In climates predicted less favourable populations are expected to decline, and in favourable climates they are expected to persist. However, little comparative empirical support exists for a relationship between predicted climate suitability and population performance. We found that the performance of 93 populations of 34 plant species worldwide – as measured by in situ population growth...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    26

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    26

Affiliations

  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    26
  • Leipzig University
    10
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    6
  • University of Göttingen
    6
  • Friedrich Schiller University Jena
    6
  • University of Freiburg
    3
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    3
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • Aarhus University
    2
  • Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries
    2