9 Works

Data from: Identification of source-sink dynamics in mountain lions of the Great Basin

Alyson M. Andreasen, Kelley M. Stewart, William S. Longland, Jon P. Beckmann & Matthew L. Forister
Natural and anthropogenic boundaries have been shown to affect population dynamics and population structure for many species with movement patterns at the landscape level. Understanding population boundaries and movement rates in the field for species that are cryptic and occur at low densities is often extremely difficult and logistically prohibitive; however genetic techniques may offer insights that have previously been unattainable. We analyzed thirteen microsatellite loci for 739 mountain lions (Puma concolor) using muscle tissue...

Data from: Differential hippocampal gene expression is associated with climate-related natural variation in memory and the hippocampus in food-caching chickadees

Vladimir V. Pravosudov, , Matthew L. Forister, Lara D. LaDage, Robin Kramer, Faye Schilkey, Alexander M. Van Der Linden & T. C. Roth
There is significant and often heritable variation in cognition and its underlying neural mechanisms, yet specific genetic contributions to such variation are not well characterized. Black-capped chickadees present a good model to investigate the genetic basis of cognition because they exhibit tremendous climate-related variation in memory, hippocampal morphology and neurogenesis rates throughout the North American continent, and these cognitive traits appear to have a heritable basis. We examined the hippocampal transcriptome profiles of laboratory-reared chickadees...

Data from: Specificity, rank preference and the colonization of a non-native host plant by the Melissa blue butterfly

Matthew L. Forister, Cynthia F. Scholl, Josh P. Jahner, Joseph S. Wilson, James A. Fordyce, Zach Gompert, Divya R. Narala, C. Alex Buerkle & Chris C. Nice
Animals often express behavioral preferences for different types of food or other resources, and these preferences can evolve or shift following association with novel food types. Shifts in preference can involve at least two phenomena: a change in rank preference or a change in specificity. The former corresponds to a change in the order in which hosts are preferred, while a shift in specificity can be an increase in the tendency to utilize multiple hosts....

Data from: Sea level, topography, and island diversity: phylogeography of the Puerto Rican Red-eyed Coquí, Eleutherodactylus antillensis

Brittany S. Barker, Javier A. Rodríguez-Robles, Vani S. Aran, Ashley Montoya, Robert B. Waide & Joseph A. Cook
Quaternary climatic oscillations caused changes in sea level that altered the size, number, and degree of isolation of islands, particularly in land-bridge archipelagoes. Elucidating the demographic effects of these oscillations increases our understanding of the role of climate change in shaping evolutionary processes in archipelagoes. The Puerto Rican Bank (Puerto Rico and the Eastern Islands, which comprise Vieques, Culebra, the Virgin Islands, and associated islets) in the eastern Caribbean Sea periodically coalesced during glaciations and...

Data from: Population genetic structure and its implications for adaptive variation in memory and the hippocampus on a continental scale in food-caching black-capped chickadees

Vladimir V. Pravosudov, , Matthew L. Forister, Lara D. LaDage, Theresa M. Burg, Michael J. Braun & Brian S. Davidson
Food-caching birds rely on stored food to survive the winter and spatial memory has been shown to be critical in successful cache recovery. Both spatial memory and the hippocampus, an area of the brain involved in spatial memory, exhibit significant geographic variation linked to climate-based environmental harshness and the potential reliance on food caches for survival. Such geographic variation has been suggested to have a heritable basis associated with differential selection. Here, we ask whether...

Data from: Strong natural selection during plant restoration favors an unexpected suite of plant traits

Sarah M. Kulpa & Elizabeth A. Leger
Restoration is an opportunity to study natural selection: one can measure the distribution of traits in source propagules used to found populations, compare this with the distribution of traits in successful recruits, and determine the strength and direction of selection on potentially adaptive traits. We asked if natural selection influenced seedling establishment during post-fire restoration in the Great Basin, an area where large-scale restoration occurs with a few widely available cultivars planted over a large...

Data from: Reconstructing the evolutionary history of an endangered subspecies across the changing landscape of the Great Central Valley of California.

Marjorie D. Matocq, Patrick A. Kelly, Scott E. Phillips & Jesús E. Maldonado
Identifying historic patterns of population genetic diversity and connectivity is a primary challenge in efforts to re-establish the processes that have generated and maintained genetic variation across natural landscapes. The challenge of reconstructing pattern and process is even greater in highly altered landscapes where population extinctions and dramatic demographic fluctuations in remnant populations may have substantially altered, if not eliminated, historic patterns. Here, we seek to reconstruct historic patterns of diversity and connectivity in an...

Data from: Identifying biases at different spatial and temporal scales of diversification: a case study in the Neotropical parrotlet genus Forpus

Brian Tilston Smith, Camila C. Ribas, Bret M. Whitney, Blanca E. Hernández-Baños & John Klicka
The temporal origins of the extraordinary biodiversity of the Neotropical region are highly debated. Recent empirical work has found support for alternative models on the tempo of speciation in Neotropical species further fuelling the debate. However, relationships within many Neotropical lineages are poorly understood and it is unclear how this uncertainty impacts inferences on the evolution of taxa in the region. We examined the robustness of diversification patterns in the avian genus Forpus by testing...

Data from: Genomic regions with a history of divergent selection affect fitness of hybrids between two butterfly species

Zachariah Gompert, Lauren K. Lucas, Chris Clark Nice, James Andrew Fordyce, Matthew L. Forister & C. Alex Buerkle
Speciation is the process by which reproductively isolated lineages arise, and is one of the fundamental means by which the diversity of life increases. Whereas numerous studies have documented an association between ecological divergence and reproductive isolation, relatively little is known about the role of natural selection in genome divergence during the process of speciation. Here we use genome-wide DNA sequences and Bayesian models to test the hypothesis that loci under divergent selection between two...

Registration Year

  • 2012
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Nevada Reno
    9
  • University of Wyoming
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  • University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    2
  • California State University, Stanislaus
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  • National Center for Genome Resources
    1
  • Smithsonian Institution
    1
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    1
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    1
  • Louisiana State University of Alexandria
    1
  • University of Lethbridge
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